Op-eds on Online Privacy

OpEd: Online Privacy Protection: Signs are Hopeful for Federal Action

Glenn D. Magpantay, Executive Director, National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)

When it comes to keeping sensitive information private, no one should be more alert to Congress’ latest actions than the LGBTQ community.

Less than several months into this year, Senate and House leaders have already convened multiple congressional committee hearings on to how best to protect our online data. This covers our search records, browser history, advertising tracking, social media information and much more. The goal is to help us understand who accesses, stores and especially sells our vast amount of deeply personal information.

Internet privacy has become a truly bipartisan rallying cry across the U.S. Capitol. Lawmakers from both parties appear genuinely interested in finding common ground on a solution.

“No matter who you are, you deserve privacy,” Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) correctly noted. He added that consumers don’t care “whether their information is being mined by a tech giant or a small business. They just want to be protected.”

At the other side of the aisle, Republican leader Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) this year fleshed out a federal privacy solution with proposals including a uniform national standard revolving around transparency and accountability. Importantly, she called out the inherent technological and legal difficulties of “a patchwork of state laws” – a particularly timely critique given that some legislatures appear interested in trying to regulate privacy within their boundaries.

The parameters outlined by Sen. Blumenthal and Rep. McMorris Rodgers are a good foundation for legislation. A uniform federal online privacy standard is the clearest and best way to help consumers understand their rights. This standard should apply to every company collecting our online data.

Any data collection, and especially sale of personal data, must first involve our full disclosure and approval. This disclosure must be clear and legible so that anyone using a service understands what happens to their data before signing up.

Above all, Congress should put an end to anonymous and undisclosed tracking and information sharing just because we once visited a website or used an app that never disclosed its ad tracker policies. That important issue gained special notice recently when a Wall Street Journal investigation found that Facebook collects “intensely personal information from many popular smartphone apps” even if the user has no connection to the company.

Privacy rights are a major issue for the LGBTQ community. Our members often pursue personal lives and lifestyles in secret because of fear that disclosure will spark condemnation, loss of friends and family relationships, and even job loss.

Indeed, incidents of violence are all too real for the LGBTQ community. The Human Rights Campaign has written extensively about violence and workplace discrimination against our members. 2016 was the deadliest year on record for the LGBTQ community – and that didn’t even count the victims from the Pulse tragedy.

Recently, The New York Times published the results of an investigation into mobile app privacy with this headline: “Your Apps Know Where You Were Last Night, and They’re Not Keeping It Secret.”

Authored by the award-winning Richard Harris, the article described how “at least 75 companies receive anonymous, precise location data from apps whose users enable location services….”  Many of those businesses, according to The Times, claim to track as many as 200 million mobile devices.

The NY Times, The Wall Street Journal and other independent investigations during the past year show the gaping holes in current law on online privacy. For the LGBTQ community, this issue’s importance cannot be overstated.

Federal action on a national privacy standard based on disclosure and transparency is crucial. Congress cannot wait! It must act now!

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The danger of failing to reclaim our online privacy
By Glenn Magpantay

Corporate scandals involving tech companies’ abuse of our private online data have dominated the headlines.  The implications for marginalized Americans, especially LGBTQ and racial-minority communities, are huge.

Despite progress for LGBTQ people in America, there are still many areas in the U.S. where we can be denied housing or fired from a job solely due to who we are. Physical violence and threats are still a common occurrence against LGBTQ and brown people. Every week last year on average, there was an anti-LGBTQ murder; hate crimes against South Asians spiked.

Faced with these and other obstacles, pressured to act “straighter” and “whiter,” it is depressing but understandable that many in the LGBTQ and Asian Pacific Islander communities, in attempts to stay safe, choose to live dual lives—online and offline, with trusted friends and in public. But the proliferation of websites, ad trackers, search engines, and other online companies mining, selling and profiling our personal information is a direct threat to how marginalized folks choose to lead their lives.

That’s why it is urgent for Congress to pass a comprehensive law giving all Internet users greater right to control our own private information, use it to our own benefit and remain protected from discriminatory behavior across the web.

Even a cursory look at recent scandals shows this problem’s magnitude. This week, dating site Match.com acknowledged that it had reactivated “a limited number” of closed accounts. That begs an obvious question: If accounts were closed, why did Match still have these users’ personal information, apparently years after closure?

Facebook sanctioned discrimination and allowed violations of fair housing laws by allowing advertisers to screen out “undesirables” form seeing ads.

This month, 23 consumer and privacy groups documented that Google’s YouTube website has been gathering data on kids as young as 12 in apparent violation of Federal law. In a Federal complaint, the groups allege that “illegal collection has been going on for many years and involves tens of millions of U.S. children.”

Perhaps worst of all, back in March, we learned about the massive Facebook/Cambridge Analytica scandal. 71 million Americans had personal information sent to an outside firm for the benefit of the Trump for President campaign.

Loss of control over our personal information is deeply concerning. For communities who have typically turned to the Internet as a safe-haven, the implications of these ongoing privacy scandals are especially serious. Many websites hold out the promise of being a place for likeminded people to connect. This is especially important for people whom much of society would prefer to keep at the edges.  But the repeated breaches of this promise and commoditization and distribution of our online information represents a huge breach of trust by companies that profit off these websites.

There is no substitute for Congressional action. State laws are helpful but not sufficient. Indeed, Match.com is based in Texas, which is one of 32 states with an online privacy law that supposedly requires companies to destroy personal information.

While Congress is not known for fast action, the current focus on technology issues and the related net neutrality issue could provide a unique opportunity for progress.  While net neutrality has traditionally focused on broadband providers, we now understand that internet protections can only be effective if they apply everywhere online and don’t omit the big tech platforms like Facebook and Google and services like Match.com that so powerfully impact our lives.  Neutrality rules are only meaningful if they ensure that everyone can participate fully, equally, and safely online.

It often takes a crisis to spur Congress to act, and that’s what we have right now.  The internet has become central to our politics, our culture, and our economy, but marginalized communities are once again at risk of being shut out.  Peharps the combined gravity of the neutrality and privacy issues can reinforce and propel each other forward.

Our digital selves are never truly “anonymized,” and they are not cold, meaningless points of data —online we bare our colors, creeds, and hearts. We deserve the right to reclaim our online selves. Only Congressional action can make that happen—and it must happen now.

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The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) is a federation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander organizations. 

 

Queer Asian Post-Queens Pride Party

Description:
GAPIMNY—Empowering Queer & Trans Asian Pacific Islanders and National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance invite you to our annual Queer Asian Post-Queens Pride Party!

Before the weekend ends, join us for dinner and drinks.
(It’s real food and yes beer, wine, and signature cocktails!)

$20 suggested – proceeds benefit GAPIMNY, NQAPIA, and the Nat’l Conference Scholarship Fund

Location:
Glenn, Chris, and Malcolm’s Home
3405 80th Street, Apt. 22
(corner of 34th Ave and 80th St.)
Jackson Heights, Queens

Open to all. RSVP to glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org

Directions:
Take the # 7 to 82nd St. stop in Queens. Walk down to 80th St. and then north 3 blocks to 34th Ave. Apt. building on the right.
OR
Take the E/F / G/R / V to Jackson Heights/Roosevelt Ave./74th St. stop in Queens. You will be on Roosevelt and 74th St. Cross Roosevelt Ave. (#7 subway tracks above) and walk north 3 blocks to 34th Ave. Make right and walk to 80th St. Apt. building on the right.

Contact: glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org or 917-439-3158

Join us in community after the Queens Pride Parade on June 2!

Click the link for more details about the event:

Reuniting Families Act Fact Sheet

Reuniting Families Act

The current family-based immigration system has not been updated in 20 years—keeping spouses, children, and their parents separated for years and often decades. The Reuniting Families Act would reduce family immigration visa backlogs and promote humane and timely reunification of immigrant families.

There are over 4.4 million people in the family immigration backlog waiting unconscionable periods of time to reunite with their family members. The bill reunites family members to strengthen our communities and our economy. Specifically, the bill’s provisions propose the following changes, additions, or deletions:

  • Recaptures Immigrant Visas Lost to Bureaucratic Delay—The bill recaptures unused employment-based and family-sponsored visas from fiscal years 1992-2015. For future years, unused visa numbers will automatically “roll over” to the next fiscal year.
  • Reclassifies Spouses & Minor Children of Green Card Holders as “Immediate Relatives”—so that spouses and children under 21 of lawful permanent residents who are waiting can immediately reunite with their families.  Currently, they are subject to annual numerical limits.
  • Eliminates Per-Country Limits—This addresses the decades-long backlogs from certain countries such as the Mexico, the Philippines, China, and India.
  • Provides Greater Enforcement Relief for Families—Allows more flexibility in addressing numerous hardships, including family separation, and gives immigration adjudicators and judges more discretion to handle special cases.
  • Eliminates Having to go to the Back of the Line—A family- or employment-based visa applicant can retain their earliest priority date regardless of the category of subsequent petitions.
  • Accommodates Special Immigrant Groups—provides relief for orphans and widows seeking a visa after the death of a sponsoring relative; exempts children of Filipino World War II who fought of the U.S. from family visa limits; and allows for equal treatment of all stepchildren.
  • Includes LGBTQ Immigration Protections—permits LGBTQ citizens and legal permanent residents in binational same-sex relationships to sponsor their permanent partner for immigration to the U.S.; helps individuals whose permanent partner is from a country that does not recognize same-sex marriage; ensure that same- sex refugee partners are resettled together; and that asylum grantees can have their non- married partners “follow to join” them in the U.S.

Take Action
Urge Congress to support the Reuniting Families Act.

 

Dream Act Fact Sheet

Of the approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, more than a million are undocumented young people who were brought to the United States as minors and have spent most of their lives living in the United States.

The Dream Act will protect young undocumented immigrants, who are vulnerable to deportation, many of whom are Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients.

The DACA program has allowed 800,000 young people to live, work, and study in the United States without fear of deportation, after being brought here as children.  169,000 APIs are eligible for DACA. 267,000 undocumented immigrants are LGBT.

However, President Trump has vowed to end DACA, many LGBT API youth could be deported to countries that criminalize homosexuality.  Several lawsuits have temporarily delayed, but cannot permanently block Trump’s cancellation of DACA. Congress still needs to act to save DACA and find a permanent solution for the Dreamers.

Undocumented LGBTQ people experience compounded discrimination due to their sexual orientation, gender identity, and immigration status. Approximately 75,000 Dreamers are LGBTQ, and 36,000 of them have gotten relief through DACA.

In a third of countries around the world, it is a crime to be LGBTQ. Thousands of people every year are arrested, harassed and even murdered because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Sending LGBTQ Dreamers back to these countries would gravely threaten their health and safety.

The Dream Act would provide Dreamers the opportunity to apply for permanent legal status and eventually become eligible for U.S. citizenship. It allows current, former, and future undocumented high-school graduates and GED recipients a three-step pathway to U.S. citizenship through college, work, or the armed services.

 

Take Action
Urge Congress to support the Dream Act. 

LGBT Equality Act Fact Sheet

The LGBT Equality Act

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) Americans lack basic legal protections in states across the country. The patchwork nature of current laws leaves millions of people subject to uncertainty and potential discrimination that impacts their safety, their families, and their day-to-day lives, especially in states like TX, FL, PA, GA, LA, etc.

In 30 states, LGBTQ people are at risk of being fired, refused housing or denied services simply because of who we are.

Our nation’s civil rights laws protect people on the basis of race, color, national origin, and in most cases, sex, disability, and religion. But federal law does not provide consistent non-discrimination protections based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Nearly two-thirds of LGBTQ Americans report having experienced discrimination in their personal lives.

The Equality Act would provide consistent and explicit non-discrimination protections for LGBTQ people across key areas of life, including employment, housing, credit, education, public spaces and services, federally funded programs, and jury service.

The Equality Act would amend existing civil rights laws to explicitly include sexual orientation and gender identity as protected characteristics. It also amends the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to prohibit discrimination in public spaces and services and federally funded programs on the basis of sex. Additionally, the Equality Act would update the public spaces and services covered in current law to include retail stores, services such as banks and legal services, and transportation services. These important updates would strengthen existing protections for everyone.

Every person should be judged on their merits, not their sexual orientation or gender identity. Everyone deserves a fair chance to earn a living, provide for their family and live free from the fear of harassment or discrimination.

Take Action

Urge Congress to support the LGBT Equality Act

 

LGBTQ Rights

Queer Asian & Proud
Fight for LGBT Equality
Defend Immigrants’ Rights

Asian Americans, Southeast Asians, South Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs) are the nation’s fast growing minority group and the largest segment of new immigrants coming to the United States.  More and more are coming out as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ). NQAPIA advocates for LGBTQ APIs at the intersection of immigrants’ rights, racial justice, and queerness.

The new Congress is an opportunity to advance federal legislation that protects all of our communities, especially those who are LGBTQ, Asian, immigrants, and young people.  Join NQAPIA to support the:

  • LGBT Equality Act to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender-identity in employment, housing, credit, education, public spaces and services, federally funded programs, and jury service. See our fact sheet on the LGBT Equality Act.
  • Dream Act so immigrant youth can continue to live, work, and study in the United States without fear of deportation, after being brought here as children.  169,000 APIs are eligible for DACA. 267,000 undocumented immigrants are LGBT. President Trump wants to end DACA, and many LGBT API youth could be deported to countries that criminalize homosexuality.  See our fact sheet on the Dream Act.
  • Reuniting Families Act to update and preserve the current family-based immigration system to keep families together and reduce family immigration visa backlogs.  It protects same-sex couples when one partner is from a country that does not recognize same-sex marriage, is an asylum grantee, or both are refugees and aim to be resettled together. See the Reuniting Families Act.

Urge Congress to support the LGBT Equality Act; the Dream Act, and the Reuniting Families Act to protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander communities!

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Faith Acceptance

So many LGBT Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders follow strong spiritual traditions.  Yes some traditions have overlooked LGBT people or have been outright hostile.

NQAPIA’s faith acceptance campaign includes a resource library and workshops for Christians, Buddhists, Muslims, Hindus, and Sikhs that are culturally competent for APIs.

Islam Resources

National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) compiled a set of resources, arranged by media, regarding faith affirming resources for queer, Muslim Asian Americans:

 

ARTICLES

Human Rights Campaign Faith Resources https://assets2.hrc.org/files/assets/resources/RFP_LGBTQ_Muslim_Resources.pdf https://assets2.hrc.org/files/assets/resources/HRC-MUSLIM_GUIDE.pdf https://www.hrc.org/resources/stances-of-faiths-on-lgbt-issues-islam

“I’m Muslim and I Might Not be Straight: A Resource for LGBTQ+ Muslim Youth.”

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kuPfloIByySx_WH7iSLw9RCJxsfecjlG/view

 

Muhsin Hendricks – Islamic Texts: A Source for Acceptance of Queer Individuals into Mainstream Muslim Society

https://www.equalrightstrust.org/ertdocumentbank/muhsin.pdf

 

Olfa Youssef – The Qur’an and Homosexuality

http://aminetais.com/the-quran-and-homosexuality/

Totally Radical Muslims Zine

http://www.totallyradicalmuslims.org/
a group of oakland based muslims started a zine in 2012 to confront, share, name and re-imagine experiences of islamophobia.  we created three volumes together, which are freely shared this this website. TRM has since ended, and we hope the zines inspire other projects far and wide. the zines lifted up the perspectives of often untold muslims – the radicals, queers, fabulous and fierce folks – through adding narratives of navigating the spectrum of practice, belief, ideology, sect, gender and islamophobia.

 

Human Rights Campaign: Coming Home to Islam & Self (Brochure)
https://www.hrc.org/resources/coming-home-to-islam-and-to-self

Is There Room in Islam for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Muslims? By Dr. Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle / Adapted for MPV by Tynan Power

http://www.mpvusa.org/sexuality-diversity

PFLAG: Faith Resources for Muslims

https://pflag.org/resource/faith-resources-muslims

 

BOOKS

Afdhere Jama
Queer Jihad: LGBT Muslims on Coming Out, Activism, and the Faith. Oracle Releasing: 2014. https://www.amazon.com/Queer-Jihad-Muslims-Coming-Activism/dp/0983716161/

Samra Habib
Islam and Homosexuality
(2 Volumes Set)

https://www.amazon.com/Islam-Homosexuality-2-Volumes-Set/dp/0313379009

We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir. New York: Viking. 2019
https://www.amazon.com/We-Have-Always-Been-Here/dp/0735235007

Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle
Homosexuality in Islam: Critical Reflection on Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims.
London: Oneworld Publications. 2010.

https://www.amazon.com/Homosexuality-Islam-Critical-Reflection-Transgender/dp/1851687017

Living Out Islam: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims

https://www.amazon.com/Living-Out-Islam-Lesbian-Transgender/dp/1479894672/

 

Stephen O. Murray and Will Roscoe
Islamic Homosexualities: Culture, History, and Literature

https://www.amazon.com/Islamic-Homosexualities-Culture-History-Literature/dp/0814774687/

 

BLOGS

Allah Made Me Queer

http://allahmademequeer.tumblr.com/
Faith, identity, acceptance. We are queer because that is how Allah planned it. It is not a choice, and our identities are not up for discussion.

 

The Bisexual Bangladeshi http://thebisexualbangladeshi.blogspot.com/
Coming out in inverted commas because I’m unsure as to how I feel about the term. No one should feel obligated to declare their sexuality – it is a very personal thing. However, we live in a world where people are assumed heterosexual until they assert otherwise, and as such coming out is often a practical thing you have to do. How can we expect to obtain our rights, without first asserting that we exist?

 

The Huriyah Blog

http://huriyahmag.blogspot.com/

Huriyah was a queer Muslim magazine between the years 2000 and 2010. We are now publishing content from several LGBT Muslims on issues dealing with sexuality, faith, and culture.

 

I am not Haraam

http://iamnotharaam.tumblr.com/

Welcome to the home of the “I am not Haraam” project – a blog created for LGBTQIA+ Muslims by LGBTQIA+ Muslims.

 

Haraam is an Arabic word used in Islam to mean “forbidden”. This project has been started as a way for LGBTQIA+ Muslims to stand up and proclaim that we will not allow our existence as LGBTQIA+ Muslims to be erased any longer. We are not kafirs, we are not deviant, our existence is not a sin. This is our space to say: WE ARE NOT HARAAM.

 

Muslims Against Homophobia and LGBT Faith (LA)

https://www.facebook.com/pg/MuslimsAgainstLGBTHate/

We are Muslims who believe in dignity and respect for all humans and pledge to stop and stand up to oppressions of all forms including hate against LGBTIQA and Queer human beings. We believe in treating people the way we would like to be treated.

 

Queer Muslims

http://queermuslims.tumblr.com/

A tumblr by and for queer muslims.

“Not queer like gay, queer like escaping definition,”- Brandon Wint

This tumblr seeks to celebrate and complicate what it means to hold multiple identities through posts with different viewpoints on what it means to hold multiple identities through posts with different viewpoints.

 

Queer Muslim Project

http://queermuslimproject.tumblr.com/

Samra Habib, a queer Muslim photographer, has been travelling through North America and Europe to take the portraits of LBGT Muslims willing to share their life stories and desire for connection.

Queer Ummah

http://queerummah.tumblr.com/

Queer Ummah is a small project started by Taylor Amari Little that aims to allow people to hear stories and experiences of LGBTQ+ Muslims. Why is this important? Often, LGBTQ+ Muslims aren’t given any safe spaces or representation, and are excluded from the rest of the Muslim community. Many LGBTQ+ people who come from religious families suffer from internal conflict and struggle with their own faith and feel that they must have one or the other: Be a Muslim or be queer. Contrary to popular belief, the two are not mutually exclusive. LGBTQ+ Muslims exist. And some of them are ready for you to listen.

 

Trans Muslims

http://trans-muslims.tumblr.com/

Transgender Muslims exist. We live, breathe, eat and pray just like anybody else in the ummah. This isn’t a space to debate or justify our existence to bigots – it’s so that people like us can connect with and support each other.

MOVIES

A Jihad for Love

https://www.amazon.com/Jihad-Love/dp/B001P9G3B0/

In a time when Islam is under tremendous attack from within and without, A JIHAD FOR LOVE is a daring documentary filmed in twelve countries and nine languages. Muslim gay filmmaker Parvez Sharma has gone where the silence is loudest, filming with great risk in nations where government permission to make this film was not an option.

A JIHAD FOR LOVE is the world’s first feature documentary to explore the complex global intersections between Islam and homosexuality. Parvez enters the many worlds of Islam by illuminating multiple stories as diverse as Islam itself. The film travels a wide geographic arc presenting us lives from India, Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, Egypt, South Africa and France. Always filming in secret and as a Muslim, Parvez makes the film from within the faith, depicting Islam with the same respect that the film’s characters show for it.

 

ORGANIZATIONS

Compassion Centered Islam

https://compassion-centred-islam.net https://www.facebook.com/Compassion-centred-Islam-446900425837366/

Compassion-centred-Islam.net or better known as the CCI Network was established in September 2018.  It is an initiative by Imam Muhsin Hendricks, the world’s first openly queer Imam who comes with more than two decades of knowledge and experience in queer Muslim activism. The network consists of subsidiary organizations connected to the work of Imam Muhsin Hendricks,  such as Al-Ghurbaah Foundation and the Masjidul Ghurbaah project.

We provide a safe & inclusive online space for our members.

The Network provides its members with access to critical information and training that can empower them. Here they find a supportive online community with which they can connect and through which they can feel a sense of belonging. The Network is the hub and voice of queer Muslims and other marginalized groups. This online community offers a space for networking, collaboration and relationship building across borders.

Haven: The Inclusive Muslim Union of Philadelphia

https://www.facebook.com/pg/havenimup/

An accessible and inclusive space for Muslims to connect socially, spiritually, and culturally.

 

Iftikhar Community of Texas

https://www.facebook.com/IftikharCommunity/

Iftikhar means PRIDE in Arabic, and as Queer Muslims, we take pride in our identities! Our space is open for anyone who grew up in a Muslim background or identifies as Muslim and who identifies with the LBGTQIA community. The space is respectful and confidential and accepting towards everyone regardless of where they might be in the coming out process. We are trans inclusive, bi-friendly, atheist friendly and questioning friendly.

 

KhushDC

https://khushdc.blogspot.com/

KhushDC is a social, support and political group that provides a safe and supportive environment, promotes awareness and acceptance, and fosters positive cultural and sexual identity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning (LGBTQ) and additional gender or sexual minority South Asians in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. We represent a broad array of nationalities including those of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

 

LGBT Muslims & Their Allies

https://www.facebook.com/LGBTMuslimsAndAllies/?ref=br_rs

 

Masjid al-Rabia (Chicago)

https://masjidalrabia.org/

All Muslims deserve an environment in which we can practice our faith without fear of exclusion or violence. We don’t believe it is asking too much to be uncompromisingly ourselves – as women, as queer and trans people, as “marginalized Muslims” – and still have a faith community we can come home to.

Masjid al-Rabia is an Islamic community center in Chicago providing inclusive, affirming Muslim community while fostering in an Islam that leaves no one behind.

 

The MECCA Institute (D.C.)

https://meccainstitute.org/

https://meccainstitute.org/lgbt/being-gay-and-muslim

MECCA Institute is a theological school and think tank that focuses on Progressive Islam. What is Progressive Islam? It is the kind that was practiced by Prophet Muhammad in which women, LGBT persons, and people of other faiths are welcome in the mosque. This type of Islam is always cool, always timely, and never at odds with anyone.

As such, we are an LGBT-affirming organization in which our LGBT family is part of our community in every way.

 

Muslims Against Homophobia and LGBT Hate https://www.facebook.com/MuslimsAgainstLGBTHate/?ref=br_rs

Muslim Alliance for Sexual and Gender Diversity (D.C.)

http://www.muslimalliance.org/

The Muslim Alliance for Sexual and Gender Diversity (MASGD) works to support, empower and connect LGBTQ Muslims. We seek to challenge root causes of oppression, including misogyny and xenophobia. We aim to increase the acceptance of gender and sexual diversity within Muslim communities, and to promote a progressive understanding of Islam that is centered on inclusion, justice, and equality.

MASGD hosts a retreat for LGBTQ Muslims and their partners each year.

Muslims for Progressive Values (Atlanta/L.A.)

http://www.mpvusa.org/

Since 2007 MPV establishes and nurtures vibrant progressive Muslim communities worldwide. We envision a future where Muslims all over the world champion for dignity, justice, compassion and love for all humanity and the world.

 

Muslim Youth Leadership Council

https://advocatesforyouth.org/about/our-programs/muslim-youth-leadership-council-mylc/

“I’m Muslim and I Might Not be Straight: A Resource for LGBTQ+ Muslim Youth.”

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kuPfloIByySx_WH7iSLw9RCJxsfecjlG/view

The Muslim Youth Leadership Council (MyLC) is a group of Muslim-identifying people ages 17-24 from across the country, working locally and nationally as activists, organizers, writers, leaders and more to promote LGBTQ rights, immigrant rights, and sexual and reproductive health and rights for Muslims. MyLC focuses on four main areas of work: countering Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hate, strengthening sexual health and reproductive rights for young Muslims, promoting LGBTQ rights and supporting queer Muslims, and working towards racial justice and countering anti-Blackness in our communities. Attached is a pamphlet produced by the Muslim Youth Leadership Council titled “I’m Muslim and I Might Not be Straight: A Resource for LGBTQ+ Muslim Youth.”

NOOR: LGBTQI Muslims of Seattle

http://noorseattle.tumblr.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pg/seattleqt

An all-inclusive LGBTQI (and Questioning) confidential meeting space for individuals in the greater Seattle area that have ever identified as Muslim* We aim to build a supportive and conscious community through solidarity. We view solidarity as unity amongst folx with the common interest of removing the isolation our identities often cause.

OUTMuslim

https://www.facebook.com/pg/OutMuslim/ https://twitter.com/OutMuslim

OUTMuslim is an online community that aims to increase the visibility of queer-identifying Muslims through various digital media. The intent is for people from all walks of life to bear witness to the world of LGBTQIA Muslims, in the hopes of creating room for more widespread acceptance. OUTMuslim stands behind the idea that sacred spaces should be safe spaces, and embraces people of all faiths and identities.

 

Queer Crescent Healing

https://www.facebook.com/QueerCrescent/

https://www.instagram.com/queercrescent/

Building safety, healing arts and justice with queer and trans Muslims of color

 

Queer Muslims of Boston

https://qmob.wordpress.com/ https://www.facebook.com/QMOBoston

Queer Muslims of Boston (QMOB) builds community for Queer and Trans Muslims in the Greater Boston area. We are inclusive of all individuals who identify as Muslim and LGBTIA, Queer, or Questioning. We are committed to increasing the visibility of Queer Muslims as a group, while respecting the need for privacy of individual members.

 

Queer Muslim Project

https://www.instagram.com/thequeermuslimproject/

 

SALGA-NYC

http://www.salganyc.org/

SALGA-NYC serves to promote awareness, acceptance, empowerment, and safe inclusive spaces for people of all sexual and gender identities, who trace their heritage to South Asia or who identify as South Asian.

 

Texas Queer Muslims

https://www.facebook.com/groups/689112654490730/

 

VIDEOS

EXTREME(LY) QUEER MUSLIMS

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLeRTgpWPTBRNcRw3Zi8G3iHuZN0FTkJU2

LGBT Muslim Videos on YouTube

http://tinyurl.com/LGBTMuslimVideos

 

PBS’ FIRST PERSON: QUEER & MUSLIM IN AMERICA

https://www.pbs.org/video/queer-muslim-in-america-rgyuo8/

 

We Resist: A Queer Muslim Perspective | El-Farouk Khaki | TEDxUTSC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXydVaieYdo

 

Hinduism Resources

Listed below is a compilation of resources arranged by media regarding faith affirming resources for LGBTQ Hindu Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders:

ARTICLES

Bhattar, R. and Victoria, N. (2007). Rainbow Rice: A Dialogue between two Asian American Gay Men in Higher Education and Student Affairs.  The Vermont Connection. Vol. 28.

Burlington, VT. http://www.uvm.edu/~vtconn/v28/Bhattar_Victoria.pdf

Cremier, L. (2014). Silences on Hindu lesbian subjectivity.

https://contingenthorizons.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/ch11-31-46-cremier.pdf.

Kannan, S.W. (2011). Living in the shadows: Lesbians in India. Retrieved from: https://www.e-ir.info/2011/08/18/living-in-the-shadows-lesbians-in-india/

Shekar, M. & Venkatachalam, H. (2016). Tradition: Same-sex marriage and Hinduism. In Hinduism Today: https://www.hinduismtoday.com/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=5650

Swadhin, A. (2011). Diwali: A time to be merry and gay.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/amita-swadhin/diwali-a-time-to-be-merry_b_1031781.html.

Hindu American Foundation: Hinduism and Homosexuality https://www.hafsite.org/media/pr/haf-policy-brief-hinduism-and-homosexuality

 

BOOKS

Devdutt Pattanaik

I Am Divine. So Are You: How Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and Hinduism Affirm the Dignity of Queer Identities and Sexualities. Element. 2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077N6V411/r.

Shikhandi: And Other Tales They Don’t Tell You. New Delhi: Zubaan Books. 2015. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/9383074841/

Gayatri Gopinath

Impossible Desires: Queer Diaspora’s and South Asian Public Cultures. Durham: Duke University Press. 2005.

https://www.amazon.com/Impossible-Desires-Diasporas-Cultures-Modernities-ebook-dp-B00EH BSN8E/dp/B00EHBSN8E

Rakesh Ratti

Lotus Of Another Color: An Unfolding of the South Asian Gay and Lesbian Experience. New York: Alyson Books. 1993.

https://www.amazon.com/Lotus-Another-Color-Unfolding-Experience/dp/1555831710

Ruth Vanita

Queering India: Same-Sex Love and Eroticism in Indian Culture and Society. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 2013.

Maira, Sunaina

Desis in the House: Indian American Youth Culture in New York City. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. 2002.

https://www.amazon.com/Desis-House-American-Culture-History/dp/1566399270

 

MOVIES

Harjant Gill (2007). Milind Soman Made Me Gay.

https://www.amazon.com/Milind-Soman-Made-Me-Gay/dp/B00B97E19Y

Milind Soman Made Me Gay is a conceptual documentary about desire and notions of home and belonging. The film employs a unique mix of visual elements along with voice over narration to juxtapose memories of the filmmaker’s past against stories of three gay South Asian men living in the diaspora. Overshadowing these nostalgic explorations of life “back home,” are harsh realities of homophobia and racism in America and an ongoing struggle to find a place of belonging.

 

ORGANIZATIONS

Hindu American Foundation

https://www.facebook.com/HinduAmerican/

The HAF is a non profit organization headquartered in Washinton, D.C. The HAF has advocated for a mutual respect and understanding of Hindu Americans by promoting accurate portrayals of Hinduism in education and advocating for the rights of Hindu Americans in policy. The HAF has an article written about the importance of addressing the inclusivity of LGBTQ+ identifying individuals from a Hindu perspective and context.

KhushDC

https://khushdc.blogspot.com/

KhushDC is a social, support and political group that provides a safe and supportive environment, promotes awareness and acceptance, and fosters positive cultural and sexual identity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning (LGBTQ) and additional gender or sexual minority South Asians in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

We represent a broad array of nationalities including those of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

Galva

https://www.galva108.org/

The Gay & Lesbian Vaishnava Association is an international organization dedicated to providing resources and support to LGBTQ+ Vaishnavas and Hindus and allies. Part of their mission is to spread the teachings of Lord Chaitanya to promote inclusivity and inform audiences of the experiences of those who identify as part of the third sex.

Sadhana

https://www.sadhana.org/

Our LGBTQI Committee has been brainstorming how Sadhana can be a resource and support to LGBTQI Hindus in the United States. We have begun building a database of Hindu mythic stories, sacred scriptures, traditional practices, and academic texts that portray same sex desire as natural and joyful, and that foreground the lives of tritiya prakriti individuals. We are also working on expanding our service to LGBTQI communities by creating a database of

queer-friendly Hindu temples and spaces, priests eager to perform same-sex marriages, and queer community centers for people of South Asian and Indo-Caribbean descent.

SALGA-NYC

http://www.salganyc.org/

SALGA-NYC serves to promote awareness, acceptance, empowerment, and safe inclusive spaces for people of all sexual and gender identities, who trace their heritage to South Asia or who identify as South Asian.

Satrang

http://satrang.org/

Satrang serves the South Asian LGBT*Q community by promoting awareness, acceptance, and empowerment through social, educational, and advocacy-related events. We envision an inclusive and visible community in which South Asian LGBTQ-identified people feel whole and heard.

Trikone

http://www.trikone.org/

Trikone is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) people of South Asian descent, who trace their ethnicities to one of the following places: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Tibet. Founded in 1986 in the San Francisco Bay Area, Trikone is the oldest group of its kind in the world.

Sikhism Resources

Listed below is a compilation of resources arranged by media regarding faith affirming resources for LGBTQ Sikhs:

ARTICLES:

Gill, H. (2017, May 02). To Babes, with love: An illustrator explores the intersection between queer and Sikh pride.

https://scroll.in/magazine/835015/to-babes-with-love-an-illustrator-explores-the-intersection-bet ween-queer-and-sikh-pride

Singh, M. (2015, Aug 22). How I learned to have pride in both my Sikh and gay identity.

https://qz.com/484963/how-i-learned-to-have-pride-in-both-my-sikh-and-gay-identity/

Singh, S. (2011, Nov 10). We Are One: LGBT Rights and Guru Nanak’s Legacy of Inclusion.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/lgbt-sikhs-and-guru-nanak_b_1086193

Smith, D. (2019, Jan 29). Nonbinary, Sikh, and fierce as hell: Interviewing Prabhdeep Kehal. https://www.wussymag.com/all/2019/1/28/nonbinary-sikh-and-fierce-as-hell-interviewing-prabh deep-kehal

BOOKS

Devdutt Pattanaik

I Am Divine. So Are You: How Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and Hinduism Affirm the Dignity of Queer Identities and Sexualities. Element. 2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077N6V411/r.

MOVIES

Harjant Gill (2007). Milind Soman Made Me Gay.

https://www.amazon.com/Milind-Soman-Made-Me-Gay/dp/B00B97E19Y

Milind Soman Made Me Gay is a conceptual documentary about desire and notions of home and belonging. The film employs a unique mix of visual elements along with voice over narration to juxtapose memories of the filmmaker’s past against stories of three gay South Asian men living in the diaspora. Overshadowing these nostalgic explorations of life “back home,” are harsh realities of homophobia and racism in America and an ongoing struggle to find a place of belonging.Harjant Gill (2007). Milind Soman Made Me Gay.

ORGANIZATIONS

Sarbat

http://www.sarbat.net/

Sarbat is a social and support group for LGBT Sikhs. We offer a platform for like-minded Sikhs from all walks of life and aim to promote the LGBT Sikh cause in a fair and courteous manner. We also strongly believe that there is no room for discrimination within our communities for being who we are – We would also like LGBT issues to be discussed openly within our communities without the taboo or any awkwardness attached to it. Moving forward we want local volunteers to commence Sarbat groups around the World.

Sarbat is a social and support group for LGBT Sikhs. We offer a platform for like-minded Sikhs from all walks of life and aim to promote the LGBT Sikh cause in a fair and courteous manner. We also strongly believe that there is no room for discrimination within our communities for being who we are – We would also like LGBT issues to be discussed openly within our communities without the taboo or any awkwardness attached to it. Moving forward we want local volunteers to commence Sarbat groups around the World.

SALGA-NYC

http://www.salganyc.org/

SALGA-NYC serves to promote awareness, acceptance, empowerment, and safe inclusive spaces for people of all sexual and gender identities, who trace their heritage to South Asia or who identify as South Asian.

VIDEOS

Justice for LGBT Sikhs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MuYm65qqv0s