Intern Corner: The NQAPIA Experience

By Steven

This summer went by so fast. It feels as if I only introduced myself to Ben, my supervisor, a week ago. However, ten weeks have passed, and what has happened in between has strengthened my understanding of the non-profit world, DC’s AAPI community, and the issues that affect the people we serve. From starting my first day of work with a White House reception that Barack Obama attended to marching fifty blocks through New York to advocate for Trayvon Martin and his family last weekend, I felt like each moment in this internship positioned me at a historic milestone.

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Asian American Immigration Insider Call Features Ben de Guzman

Join us on the weekly Asian American Immigration Insider Call tomorrow!

As you may know, a group of national organizations have come together to create a coordinated Asian American immigration campaign through the National Council of Asian Pacific Americans to share information, coordinate events and amplify our community’s issues in the media. The weekly Asian American Immigration Insider call is organized by these eight organizations.

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Uncovering Our Stories: Alex Ong

In May 1998, incidents of mass violence occurred throughout Indonesia. In my city, Surabaya, the rioters targeted Chinese owned stores and homes, in particular, many Chinese Indonesian women, who were raped and killed. My parents feared that our family would be next and planned to flee to the United States where they thought they could … Read more Uncovering Our Stories: Alex Ong

Intern Corner: Justice for Trayvon Martin & The OCA National Convention

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Justice for  Trayvon Martin by Steven

When the Trayvon Martin murder happened, it struck me as yet another crime against people of color that some refuse to acknowledge as racism. However, it was the verdict that exempted George Zimmerman from murder that felt like a slap in the face.  When these hate crimes happen, it reminds me of the bias that individuals still hold, though I would always respond with the hope that justice will somehow address oppression. But when our “justice” system fails to declare these actions as crimes, I am reminded that our institutions actually protect racism.

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NQAPIA STATEMENT ON COMFIRMATION OF TOM PEREZ FOR SECRETARY OF LABOR

The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) extends a warm welcome to Assistant Attorney General Tom Perez as the next secretary of labor. Tom Perez has long been a friend and ally to the AAPI and LGBT communities, and his confirmation on July 18 provides assurance that our concerns will be heard.

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NQAPIA joins national AAPI and LGBT groups in support of Trayvon Martin

NQAPIA has joined the National Council of Asian Pacific Americans (NCAPA) and the the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) with the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force (the Task Force) in expressing dismay over the George Zimmerman verdict and to show support for Trayvon Martin and his family.

In this time of dismay, we hope our communities can find support from one another and experience healing as we continue to combat a sociopolitical system that facilitates discrimination.

Below are both letters NQAPIA has cosigned with leaders from both AAPI and LGBT national organizations.

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Intern Corner: ENDA & Immigration Reform

United We Dream: Flash Mob at the Capitol by Elizabeth

This Wednesday, I had the opportunity to participate in United We Dream’s action at the Capitol for immigration reform. After a mock citizenship ceremony on the Senate lawn, over 500 DREAMers and immigrants’ rights activists gathered slowly in the Capitol Visitors’ Center. Led by little DREAMers in elementary and middle school, we recited the Pledge of Allegiance and sang the national anthem together. It was the first time the Pledge has brought tears to my eyes; probably the first time I’ve ever really heard it said with meaning and purpose accompanied by action. The energy was incredible, and as the Star Spangled Banner ended, the group began to chant, “Sí, se puede!” as police escorted us out.

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