DACA/DAPA

The original DACA program from 2012 is still accepting applications. Although the expanded DACA and DAPA programs are currently delayed by legal challenges, we expect these programs to will prevail through the courts.

What is DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS (DACA) & DEFERRED ACTION FOR PARENTAL ACCOUNTABILITY (DAPA)?

DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS (DACA)

planningAdministered by USCIS, DACA provides temporary relief from deportation for certain people brought to the United States as minors. It allows individuals who qualify to stay in the U.S. and obtain a work permit. DACA is granted on a case-by-case basis and does not provide a path to lawful permanent residence or U.S. citizenship. The DACA program was expanded by the November 20th announcement but the revisions are not yet in place. Check www.uscis.gov for updates.

Eights guidelines to qualify for the DACA program:

  1. Under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012. The expanded DACA program will eliminate the age ceiling.
  2. At least 15 years of age at the time of application or in removal proceedings.
  3. Entered the United States before the age of 16.
  4. Continuously resided in the United States (U.S.) since June 15, 2007 to the present time. The expanded DACA will change this date to January 1, 2010.
  5. Physically present in the U.S. on June 15, 2012 and at the time of applying for DACA.
  6. Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012.
  7. Either currently in school, graduated from high school, completed a GED or equivalent, or a veteran honorably discharged.
  8. Not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

In coming months, work visas will be extended from two to three years. Current DACA recipients should check with USCIS about how these changes will impact them. DACA recipients must reapply every two years. Recipients should start the process between 120-150 days before expiration.

Find videos about DACA in Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean and Thai as well as receive legal advice in these languages at Asian American’s Advancing Justice and guides in Bengali, Urdu, and Hindi at South Asian Americans Leading Together.

Apply for DACA

To apply for DACA or renew DACA, visit www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals.

If you need legal assistance in applying for DACA, explore NQAPIA’s legal resources.

Many LGBT young people, who were undocumented, have benefited from the DACA program and have gained legal status and work authorization.

DEFERRED ACTION FOR PARENTAL ACCOUNTABILITY (DAPA)

Info TableThe Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA), administered by USCIS, provides temporary relief from deportation and work authorization to undocumented parents of U.S. citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs). DAPA lasts for three years and is not yet accepting applicantions.

Qualification for the DAPA program:

  1. Have a U.S. citizen or LPR son or daughter (by blood or adoption) as of November 20, 2014
  2. Continuously resided in the United States since before January 1, 2010
  3. Physically present in the United States on November 20, 2014, and at the time of applying
  4. Have no lawful immigration status on November 20, 2014
  5. No criminal convictions (including a felony, significant misdemeanor, or three or more misdemeanors), no gang involvement or terrorism, not a recent unlawful entrants, and others
  6. Pass a background check that includes a criminal and immigration background check

Check www.uscis.gov to confirm start dates and the application process.

Now, parents of LGBT people can benefit and gain legal status.

How do I prepare?

  1. Save money (at least $465 for the application fee).
  2. Get proof of identity such as a government-issued passport, birth certificate or ID card.
  3. Gather proof of relationship to U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (LPR) son or daughter.
  4. Gather proof of how long you have been in the U.S.
  5. Gather any criminal records.
  6. If you have a criminal conviction, check with an attorney to expunge, vacate, or modify this conviction.
  7. If you have a prior deportation or removal order, check with an attorney.
  8. Stay informed and know your rights!

For more information go to http://nilc.org/toptenwaystoprep.html.

Where can I find assistance to apply?

If you are in need of legal assistance, view NQAPIA’s list of legal resources that are free or low-cost. The specific groups listed here have not been vetted by NQAPIA to be queer friendly. Be sure to seek assistance from trusted clinics, and be aware of scams.

If you need help finding assistance, fill out NQAPIA’s DACA intake form, and we will help match you with free legal assistance.

Immigration Relief Executive Action Fact Sheet

NQAPIA Immigration Relief Executive Action Fact Sheet

People can currently apply for the DACA program that was announced on June 15, 2012. The expanded DACA program and DAPA is being delayed by partisan politics. We encourage people to prepare for the new programs. We will email our list as we have more information on the executive order.

President Obama announced several executive actions on immigration that can change the lives of millions of individuals. His announcements came after years, if not decades, of organizing and advocacy from immigrant communities.

NQAPIA commends the President for his actions and so many LGBT people, especially those who are Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, or Pacific Islander will enjoy relief from deportation.  Yet, we also urge law-makers to consider those still left behind. Many LGBTs will not benefit if they are not married or have children. Those who got into trouble with the law, no matter the reason or if dues have been paid, are excluded.  NQAPIA will press for more comprehensive solutions that include all of our community and we encourage those who qualify to APPLY for current programs.

Chinese Fact Sheet
Hindi Fact Sheet
Chinese & English Fact Sheet
English Fact Sheet

What is an executive action on immigration?
What does the executive action do, and who qualifies?
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA)
How do I prepare?
Where can I find assistance to apply?
Are there any risks?
Other people who will benefit.
Enforcement of immigration laws.
Where do we go from here?
Learn more

WHAT IS EXECUTIVE ACTION ON IMMIGRATION?

On June 15, 2012, the President announced the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. This program allowed certain undocumented individuals to lawfully stay in the U.S. and gain work authorization. Since June 30, 2014, 685,544 people have participated in DACA. The Asian countries with the largest estimated number of youth eligible are South Korean (33,000), Philippine (15,000), China (15,000), India (11,000), and Pakistan.

On November 20, 2014, President Barack Obama announced expansions to the DACA program and a new Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) program.  This was done through a series of executive memoranda issued by the Department of Homeland Security.  DACA and DAPA will provide temporary relief from deportation for up to 5 million undocumented immigrants.

The programs are not a permanent fix to our broken immigration system, which only Congress can do.

 

WHAT DOES THE EXECUTIVE ACTION DO AND WHO QUALIFIES?

DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS (DACA)

planningAdministered by USCIS, DACA provides temporary relief from deportation for certain people brought to the United States as minors. It allows individuals who qualify to stay in the U.S. and obtain a work permit. DACA is granted on a case-by-case basis and does not provide a path to lawful permanent residence or U.S. citizenship. The DACA program was expanded by the November 20th announcement but the revisions are not yet in place. Check www.uscis.gov for updates.

Eights guidelines to qualify for the DACA program:

  1. Under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012. The expanded DACA program will eliminate the age ceiling.
  2. At least 15 years of age at the time of application or in removal proceedings.
  3. Entered the United States before the age of 16.
  4. Continuously resided in the United States (U.S.) since June 15, 2007 to the present time. The expanded DACA will change this date to January 1, 2010.
  5. Physically present in the U.S. on June 15, 2012 and at the time of applying for DACA.
  6. Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012.
  7. Either currently in school, graduated from high school, completed a GED or equivalent, or a veteran honorably discharged.
  8. Not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

In coming months, work visas will be extended from two to three years. Current DACA recipients should check with USCIS about how these changes will impact them. DACA recipients must reapply every two years. Recipients should start the process between 120-150 days before expiration.

Find videos about DACA in Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean and Thai as well as receive legal advice in these languages at Asian American’s Advancing Justice and guides in Bengali, Urdu and Hindi at South Asian Americans Leading Together.

To apply for DACA or renew DACA, visit www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals.

Many LGBT young people, who were undocumented, have benefited from the DACA program and have gained legal status and work authorization.

DEFERRED ACTION FOR PARENTAL ACCOUNTABILITY (DAPA)

Info TableThe Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA), administered by USCIS, provides temporary relief from deportation and work authorization to undocumented parents of U.S. citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs). DAPA lasts for three years and should be ready for application in late May 2015.

Qualification for the DAPA program:

  1. Have a U.S. citizen or LPR son or daughter (by blood or adoption) as of November 20, 2014
  2. Continuously resided in the United States since before January 1, 2010
  3. Physically present in the United States on November 20, 2014, and at the time of applying
  4. Have no lawful immigration status on November 20, 2014
  5. No criminal convictions (including a felony, significant misdemeanor, or three or more misdemeanors), no gang involvement or terrorism, not a recent unlawful entrants, and others
  6. Pass a background check that includes a criminal and immigration background check

Check www.uscis.gov to confirm start dates and the application process.

Now, parents of LGBT people can benefit and gain legal status.

 

HOW DO I PREPARE

  1. Save money (at least $465 for the application fee).
  2. Get proof of identity such as a government-issued passport, birth certificate or ID card.
  3. Gather proof of relationship to U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (LPR) son or daughter.
  4. Gather proof of how long you have been in the U.S.
  5. Gather any criminal records.
  6. If you have a criminal conviction, check with an attorney to expunge, vacate, or modify this conviction.
  7. If you have a prior deportation or removal order, check with an attorney.
  8. Stay informed and know your rights!

For more information go to http://nilc.org/toptenwaystoprep.html.

 

WHERE CAN I FIND ASSISTANCE TO APPLY?

Fees to apply for DACA and work authorization are currently $465, with limited fee waivers for people in need. USCIS is expected to begin accepting applications for expanded DACA in February 2015 and DAPA in May 2015. Seek advice from trusted legal immigration service provider and be aware of scams.

For clinics who serve API and/or LGBT populations, please email nqapia@gmail.com

 

ARE THERE ANY RISKS IN APPLYING FOR RELIEF?

No Human is IllegalEvery person who applies for administrative relief must go through a national security and criminal background check. Anyone who qualifies for relief will be entered into a national database, and there will be a simple fine for the unauthorized entry.  We encourage people to apply, and be prepared. BE AWARE OF FRAUD. Work with trusted legal immigration service providers. This is temporary relief, and we can work together to change our nation’s immigration laws and create a permanent pathway to citizenship.

 

 

OTHERS WHO WILL BENEFIT FROM ADMINISTRATIVE ACTION:

EMPLOYMENT AND STUDENT VISAS

President Obama’s executive actions also included proposed changes in the visa programs. Individuals should talk to an immigration lawyer, and check www.uscis.gov for updates.

  • Expansion of degree programs eligible for Optional Practical Training (OPT) program, which authorizes foreign students from U.S. schools to gain work experience after graduation.  Students in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields will be allowed to work for a longer period in the United States.
  • Greater visa portability for employment-based permanent resident status.
  • Provide employment authorization (H4 visa) to spouses (including same-sex spouses) of H1B foreign workers who have been approved for a green card.

Several other changes are being proposed, and a task force is working to modernize the visa processing system.  Check http://www.dhs.gov/immigration-action for more information.

Many LGBT Asians and South Asians come to the United States on professional worker (H1B) visas or as foreign students (F-1). These changes will extend the time that they can stay in the US and improve their experience with securing a visa.

 

HOW ABOUT ENFORCEMENT OF IMMIGRATION LAWS?

DHS has discounted the problematic the Secure Communities program as a result of organizing and advocacy around the nation.  However, a new Priority Enforcement Program (PEP) focuses on national security, border security, and public safety.  Unlike Secure Communities that focused on pre-conviction arrests, PEP prioritizes detention and deportation post-conviction and continues to rely on cooperation with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. DHS programs such 287(g) and Criminal Alien Program still exist. DHS continues to expand the opening of new detention centers including those for families and children. If you need support with immigration enforcement concerns, please contact American Immigration Lawyers Association.

Work permits for foreign students graduating in the Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Maths (STEM) are expanded for 2.5 years under Optional Practical Training (OPTs).  OPT will be expanded to include many more fields of study.  A significant number of LGBT students studying in the United States as F-1 student visa holders are from Asian countries.  Oftentimes, they come to the US to study, and then they come out.  Moreover, the administration is considering an expansion of the fields of study that qualify for OPTS.

This is a step in the right direction, but NQAPIA and our allies will still monitor the programs for the impact on LGBTs.

 

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

Queer Asian Undocumented UnafraidAdministrative relief is a temporary solution. Our community must organize and press Congress for a permanent solution to our broken immigration system. The executive action also excludes community members with criminal convictions and LGBT people who do not have legally recognized partnerships or supportive families. The administrative action allows for profiling of communities under concerns of “national security” or “gang violence” with limited civil liberty protection.

As a community we must work to protect all of our family members.
Donate
 or contact nqapia@gmail.com to support NQAPIA’s work on immigration.

 

LEARN MORE

Contact us at nqapia@gmail.com with any questions.

 

The National Queer Asian Pacific IslanderAlliance (NQAPIA) is a federation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI)organizations. We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBT AAPIgroups, develop leadership, promote visibility, educate our community, enhance grassroots organizing, expand collaborations, and challenge homophobia and racism.

English – Immigration Relief Executive Action Fact Sheet

Chinese – Immigration Relief Executive Action Fact Sheet

Chinese and English – Immigration Relief Executive Action Fact Sheet

Hindi – Immigration Relief Executive Action Fact Sheet

Marking the day of uplift: #TransLivesMatter

Written by: Janani Bala

On the eve of Trans Day of Remembrance (TDOR) and marking the day of uplift for #TransLivesMatter, we continue to have a great deal to mourn. Every 32 hours a trans woman is reported murdered. 2013 was a record year for violence against LGBTQ people, with a 29% increase over the year previous. 53% of LGBT homicide victims were trans women. Proximity to transphobic and homophobic violence is determined by race, class, gender, geography, etc—89% of LGBT homicide victims are people of color. We can’t separate our understanding of gender liberation from racial and economic justice. Some of the worst sites of anti-trans violence continue to be prisons, detention centers, and police encounters.

Trans people seeking asylum for gender-based violence, for example, are frequently detained and face continued rates of gender and sexual violence within detention centers. Rates of sexual assault in detention are 15 times higher for queer people than their heterosexual counterparts. Trans people, especially trans women, face additional violences in detention including in immigration detention: misgendering, lack of appropriate healthcare access, and anti-trans harassment and violence.

As immigrant and/or diasporic people, our take on trans work is not just about respecting pronouns. It’s about reclaiming models of trans-ness/gender self-determination that have been erased—through war, colonialism, genocide—from our ancestry and archives. We have to bring our communities with us. It’s about a trans politics that holds non-English speakers and ways of giving voice to gender justice in our original tongues. It’s about trans politics that centers undocumented people, incarcerated people, detained people, deported people. It’s about acknowledging that not all of us have access to spaces or capital to express our genders and bodies, about valuing both visibility and invisibility. It means that when Filipin@ and queer/trans activists demand #JusticeForJennifer (Jennifer Laude),  trans woman murdered by a US soldier in the Phillipines, it is a move towards both demilitarization and deescalation of gender-based violence. Violence against trans people escalates under militarism, under police, under prison culture—those systems actually necessitate gender policing and therefore anti-trans violence.

We can’t continue to view trans justice as only a matter of honoring our dead, however. How can we support trans activists who are doing the constant work of manifesting gender justice now? Our comrades need both our resources and energy. Here are some steps you can take immediately:

1. Sign this petition in solidarity with Jennifer Laude

2. If you have the means available to you, consider giving to a fund for grassroots trans-led organizing.

A message from NQAPIA: Join NQAPIA, GABRIELA USA and API Equality-Northern California for #transwk in raising visibility of AAPI Trans communities. Share your stories of empowerment and honor those we’ve lost.

Sample Tweets:

  • If we are committed to trans life, we must be committed to ending military and police violence #Justice4Jennifer #TransLivesMatter #TDOR
  • 89% of LGBT hate violence victims are POC. Anti-queer violence is racialized. #TransLivesMatter #TDOR
  • Trans solidarity looks like RESOURCING our community, while also honoring our dead.  #TransLivesMatter #TDOR
  • Jennifer Laude’s life and death is about both trans and anti-colonial justice–the two are linked. #Justice4Jennifer #TDOR
  • Jennifer Laude’s death is a product of both militarization and anti-trans violence. Demand justice: bit.ly/justice4jennifer #Justice4Jennifer

We Need Your Help- And Your Photos!

NQAPIA Request for Family Photo for “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love” materials for parents with LGBT children.

NQAPIA needs photos of loving families with parents who love their LGBT children.   NQAPIA is developing a series of translated one-page documents for parents of LGBT kids.

We hope it can be helpful for people who are getting ready to come out to their parents.  It will be translated into Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Tagalog, Ilocano, Vietnamese, Thai, Khmer, Hindi, Bengali, Urdu, Arabic.  Maybe Hmong, Lao, Punjabi, Indonesian and other languages.

A document with only text can be boring.  We want to make sure they are captivating and portray loving families with parents and LGBT children.

Would you kindly share any family pictures that you have of your family with us to include?  You can include more than one photo. Please e-mail them to <glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org>

Thank you for your help and here are some specs and details to submit.

-Glenn Magpantay

 

PHOTO SPECS

Family portraits or simple family pictures are sufficient

Simple background with few colors preferred (for black /white printing)

Resolution: Full-size  (minimum 600 dpi suitable for printing)

Jpeg or Tiff format preferred

INCLUDE IN TEXT OF EMAIL or title

– Family Name (optional)

– Ethnicity/ National origin / Languages(s) spoken (to correspond to translation)

– The following permission:

“I give NQAPIA permission to use this photo for the “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love” materials for parents with LGBT children.”

SEND PHOTOS TO:

glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org

Write in the Subject Line: “Family is Still Family: Photos”

Williams Institute Releases Study on AAPI LGBT Communities

The Williams Institute has just released “LGBT Asian and Pacific Islander Individuals and Same-sex Couples,” a study that provides data on a variety of social, economic, and demographic characteristics of the Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.  NQAPIA recognizes the lack of sufficient research on our communities and commends the Williams Institute for taking this important step.

Because of the diverse nature of the AAPI population, with over 18 million people representing over 40 ethnic communities, aggregate data for the community masks some of the realities and disparities in our community.  For example, while data on educational attainment for AAPIs overall trends higher than other ethnic groups and perpetuates a “model minority myth,” we know that challenges of language access and socioeconomic status are a part of a more complex picture where groups like Southeast Asians and Pacific Islanders have dramatically lower levels of education.

The Williams Institute’s inclusion of separate data for Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders is a good step to take, and while we are glad that they acknowledge the need for disaggregated data, the overarching conclusions and key findings about success for AAPI same-sex couples require a closer look about how different ethnic groups may have dramatically different outcomes.  We also know that language matters and that the methodologies for multilingual survey research in our communities that are conducted in the languages we speak are better able to access a more representative sample.

We welcome the opportunity this important study provides to have a conversation about AAPI LGBT communities and are eager to engage the Williams Institute, as well as other institutions that create and use this kind of research about how best to work with our communities to get the best information.

Asian American Immigration Insider Call Features Ben de Guzman

Join us on the weekly Asian American Immigration Insider Call tomorrow!

As you may know, a group of national organizations have come together to create a coordinated Asian American immigration campaign through the National Council of Asian Pacific Americans to share information, coordinate events and amplify our community’s issues in the media. The weekly Asian American Immigration Insider call is organized by these eight organizations.

Read more

NQAPIA Op-Ed on LGBT Undocumented

NQAPIA Co-Director Ben de Guzman attended the launch of a report by the Center for American Progress and the Williams Institute on LGBT undocumented immigrants.  Some of the key findings of “Living in Dual Shadows” include:

  • 267,000 LGBT undocumented immigrants
  • LGBT undocumented immigrants are more likely to be Asian (15% of the LGBT undocumented population v. 11% of the entire undocumented population) and young (49% under 30 among LGBT undocumented population v. 30% among entire LGBT undocumented population)
  • 32,000 binational couples

NQAPIA’s op-ed on the report’s findings were published in Huffingtonpost’s “Gay Voices” section.  It is included in its entirety below:

“Immigrants Living in Dual Shadows, LGBT Undocumented,” just released by the Center for American Progress and the Williams Institute, is quite an eye opener. The National Queer Asian Pacific Island Alliance (NQAPIA) commends them on this cutting-edge report.

The current debate in Washington and across the country around comprehensive immigration reform requires the engagement of everyone, including the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community. This important research finally gives us an opportunity to put real numbers behind the work we do — to push for a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, for improvements to the system for high-skilled and low-wage workers, to reuniting families — including LGBT families, to easing the restrictions to applying for asylum, and for a more humane system for enforcement of immigration laws.

Some of the key findings reveal that the actual number of LGBT undocumented people in the U.S. are disproportionately younger and Asian than the overall undocumented population. The percentage of Asian, LGBT undocumented immigrants is significantly larger than that of our straight counterparts. We are 15 percent of the LGBT undocumented immigrant population, as opposed to 11 percent of all undocumented immigrants. This is a critical sign that we need to increase our efforts to raise our voices for reform in our local communities and in Washington.

Oversimplified categorizations stereotype the concerns communities have around immigration. Latinos do not just care about a path to citizenship. Asians do not just care about more family visas and high-tech workers. And, the LGBT community is fighting for reforms broader than only those affecting bi-national couples.

We all have a stake in truly comprehensive immigration reform that works for all our families — LGBT and straight, undocumented and citizen. Through NQAPIA’s “Uncovering Our Stories” campaign, and the thousands of postcards we are collecting that call for reform, we will be lifting up even more information from our communities about the true impact of the broken immigration system and the need for real reform.

Join us! Get involved!

Uncovering Our Stories: LGBT Asian/ South Asian/ Southeast Asian/ Pacific Islander Immigrants Speak OUT on Immigration

(Photo:  Jose Antonio Vargas, openly gay undocumented immigrant and founder of DefineAmerican.com, speaks at 2012 NQAPIA Conference)

 

As the debates around comprehensive immigration reform heat up, the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) seeks to ensure that the real life concerns of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) immigrants are brought to the fore and are part of the discussion.

NQAPIA is seeking queer AAPI immigrants to tell their stories and document them for inclusion in our work talking with policymakers.  We are especially seeking individuals who can talk about their experiences, troubles, goals, and ideas for reform with:

– being undocumented

– becoming a U.S. citizen and naturalization

– seeking or renewing their visas (either profession H1B or student F-1)

– petitioning for family members or same-sex partners

– applying for political asylum

– attending school

– domestic abuse or law enforcement misconduct

– racial profiling, detention, or deportation

In 2010, we shared four such stories at our New York LGBT Immigration Forum.  In 2013, we’re working with partners all over the country to raise up our voices on these issues.  One of the most powerful tools we have are our stories- real life examples of why the broken immigration system needs to be changed and how it uniquely affects us as LGBTQ people and our families.

Can you share your story with us?  Do you know someone else who can?  Contact us at nqapia@gmail.com for more information.  Stories shared by 2/28 will be able to have impact as action heats up in March and April.

Anonymity and confidentiality will be preserved.  Stories can be shared under the protection of a lawyer.  No personal information will be publically distributed without the person’s consent.  We will work with people to make sure they are best prepared to tell their stories in the best possible way.

NQAPIA’s goal is to identify the most pressing issues in immigration reform that will meaningfully improve the lives of LGBTQ AAPI immigrants.

 

Thank you,

Ben de Guzman, NQAPIA Co-Director

 

NQAPIA Resources

Support Available to attend AAPI Institute at Creating Change

NQAPIA is, for the third year in a row, helping plan an all day AAPI Institute at The National Conference on  LGBT Equality: Creating Change.  Thanks to our friends at the Queer Justice Fund of Asian Americans/ Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy and API Equality- Northern California, a special fund is available to support participation in the AAPI Institute.

This scholarship is being offered to assist in bringing underserved and underrepresented Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to the Task Force’s Creating Change Conference to attend the day-long AAPI Institute. The scholarship will provide transportation and/or lodging, but not registration to the conference. In order to apply for this scholarship, you must complete this form by December 31, 2012. When the committee decides on who will receive the scholarship, all recipients will need to be accessible by phone between January 4th – January 7th to finalize your accommodations. Additionally, you are required to attend the day-long AAPI Institute on Thursday, January 24th and arrive before 8PM on Wednesday, the 23rd.

Click here for more information and to apply.

Planning Committee of the first AAPI Institute at 2011 Creating Change

NQAPIA Recognizes Transgender Day of Remembrance

Since 1998, the Transgender Day of Remembrance has stood as a reminder of the toll transphobia has taken on our communities and to memorialize the lives of those we have lost through senseless violence.

The Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community is no stranger to transphobia, as well as a host of other forms of violence (racism, xenophobia, anti-religious extremism, and more).  Today, NQAPIA recognizes the members of our communities we have lost, celebrates the resilience that those of us who are transgender build together, and stands in solidarity with them and with all people of good conscience to work for a better future for us all.

 

Resources:

Injustice at Every Turn:  Special report on AAPI respondents to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey, published in collaboration with the National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force

transAPIvoices:  Youtube channel dedicated to sharing the stories of AAPI trans and gender nonconforming people

White House:  Statement on the White House meeting with transgender advocates and leaders