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2016 November Elections

The November election is critical. The Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community is made up of 9.3 million eligible voters, and 90% of those who are registered will vote. In many places, AAPIs create the margin of victory. Learn more statistics with our voter infographicsYour vote matters, and we want you to be prepared for the election on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

Voter Guide

nqapia-voter-guide-checklistWe created a voter guide that shows the views of Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump on LGBTQ equality, trans* justice, racial justice, AAPI issues, and immigrants’ rights. Our research came from the candidates’ official policy statements and quotes from news media. View our voter guide, and click the links below for PDF copies:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide
NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide in Chinese
NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide in Hindi
NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide in Korean
NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide in Vietnamese

NQAPIA is an independent, nonpartisan, tax-exempt, nonprofit organization and does not endorse any candidate or political party.

Learn the Issues

Even if you feel dismayed by the presidential election, there are many more issues on your local ballots. Learn more about your local politics at Ballotpedia.

Protect our Rights

AALDEF - The Asian American VoteWhen reporting on the election, news media overlooks AAPIs—except when we are the butt of their jokes. (Sign a petition against The O’Reilly Factor’s racist segment on Watter’s World.) Even at the polls, AAPIs have faced a series of segregated barriers, including segregated “Asian” voting lines.

 

Join us in conducting a non-partisan survey of Asian American voters to document Asian American voting patterns and documenting instances of anti-Asian voter disenfranchisement by volunteering with  AALDEF on Election Day. Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) needs volunteers in DC, CA, FL, GA, LA, MA, MD, MI, NJ, NM, NV, NY, PA, TX, and VA.

Register to Vote

You may still have time to register to vote in your state! Find out and register online by clicking the image below or going to bit.ly/nqapia16. This application is available in 13 languages.

Register to vote at bit.ly/nqapia16.

2016 Voter Guide

Click the links below for PDF copies and translations of this voter guide:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide ~ Chinese ~ Hindi ~ Korean ~ Vietnamese

nqapia-voter-guide-pg1-reminders

Click the links below for PDF copies and translations of this voter guide:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide ~ Chinese ~ Hindi ~ Korean ~ Vietnamese

nqapia-voter-guide-checklist

Click the links below for PDF copies and translations of this voter guide:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide ~ Chinese ~ Hindi ~ Korean ~ Vietnamese

nqapia-voter-guide-details

nqapia-voter-guide-pg4-facts-disclaimers

Click the links below for PDF copies and translations of this voter guide:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide ~ Chinese ~ Hindi ~ Korean ~ Vietnamese

2016 Voter Infographics

API's are the largest set of new immigrants (both documented & undocumented) to the US.

API’s are the largest set of new immigrants (both documented & undocumented) to the US.

AAPI's are the nation's fastest growing minority group & an increasing segment of the LGBT community.

AAPI’s are the nation’s fastest growing minority group & an increasing segment of the LGBT community.

This year's presidential race will be very close and decided by the slimmest of margins. (Source: Washington Post, CNN)

This year’s presidential race will be very close and decided by the slimmest of margins. (Source: Washington Post, CNN)

By 2060, 1 of every ten Americans will be of Asian descent.

By 2060, 1 of every ten Americans will be of Asian descent.

There's been a 16% increase in the number of eligible AAPI voters since the last presidential election.

There’s been a 16% increase in the number of eligible AAPI voters since the last presidential election.

Just 537 votes (in Florida) decided the 2000 presidential race between Al Gore and George Bush. EVERY VOTE COUNTS.

Just 537 votes (in Florida) decided the 2000 presidential race between Al Gore and George Bush. EVERY VOTE COUNTS.

Register to vote at bit.ly/nqapia16.
Register to vote at bit.ly/nqapia16.

Volunteers Needed to Defend Asian American Voting Rights

DC • CA • FL • GA • LA • MA • MD • MI • NJ • NM • NV • NY • PA • TX • VA

AALDEF 2016 Election Infographic

2016 Asian American Exit Poll and Poll Monitoring

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

In past elections, Asian Americans have faced a series of barriers in exercising their right to vote, including segregated “Asian” voting lines. When the news media reported on election results, Asian Americans were overlooked. In response, the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) has conducted a non-partisan survey of Asian American voters to document Asian American voting patterns and document instances of anti-Asian voter disenfranchisement. AALDEF has also monitored the elections for compliance with the federal Voting Rights Act, which mandates bilingual ballots and forbids anti-Asian voter discrimination.

We need your help. In the 2012 elections, 850 volunteers polled 9,096 Asian American voters in 14 states and Washington, DC. All are welcome to volunteer for our exit poll, which we will conduct in CA, FL, GA, LA, MA, MD, MI, NJ, NM, NV, NY, PA, TX, VA, and Washington, DC. Exit poll volunteers work in 3-hour shifts. We are also looking for law students and attorneys to monitor polls in NY, NJ, MA, and possibly in MI and PA. We will conduct mandatory 60-minute community trainings (90 minutes for CLE trainings) in all of these regions. All volunteers must be non-partisan during the time that they help. Complete the form at www.aaldef.net. Thank you!

For more information, contact AALDEF Democracy Program Director Jerry Vattamala or Voting Rights Organizer Iris Zalun at 800-966-5946 or votingrights@aaldef.org.

We Need Your Help for our 2016 Voter Guide

2016 Voter Guide
The 2016 Presidential Election is just over 3 months away, and NQAPIA is developing a non-partisan Voter Guide to ensure that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) voters are fully informed.

What Should We Ask the Candidates?

The Voter Guide will provide insight into the presidential candidates’ positions on various issues concerning LGBTQ equality, AAPI issues, racial justice, trans justice, and immigrants’ rights.

Take the survey to help us select the questions.

The top selected questions and answers will be translated into various Asian languages, including Chinese, Koream, Vietnamese, and Hindi.

There are many potential questions to ask, but space is limited. We will publish more questions and answers online in English.

Ready to learn about the candiates?
Take the 2016 Voter Guide Survey by Sunday, July 31.

LGBT Advocacy Groups Stand With Civil Rights Counterparts in Disappointment at Supreme Court Ruling on Voting Rights

NQAPIA joined this statement put forward by national LGBT advocacy organizations today in response to the Supreme Court decision in the Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder.  We had joined the amicus brief submitted by Asian American organizations in support of Voting Rights and join our partners in the civil rights and LGBT movements expressing our disappointment in today’s ruling.

 

For Immediate Release 06/25/13

LGBT Advocacy Groups Stand With Civil Rights Counterparts in Disappointment at Supreme Court Ruling on Voting Rights

Washington, DC – Today, the Supreme Court struck down a central part of the Voting Rights Act, invalidating crucial protections passed by Congress in 1965 and renewed four times in the decades since. The sharply divided decision will significantly reduce the federal government’s role in overseeing voting laws in areas with a history of discrimination against African-Americans.

We, America’s leading LGBT advocacy organizations, join civil rights organizations – and indeed, all Americans whom this law has served to protect – in expressing acute dismay at today’s ruling. Not only had Congress repeatedly reaffirmed the need for this bedrock civil rights protection, but authoritative voices from across America had filed amicus briefs urging the court not to undermine the law: the NAACP; the American Bar Association; the Navajo Nation; the states of New York, California, Mississippi and North Carolina; numerous former Justice Department officials charged with protecting voting rights; dozens of U.S. senators and representatives; and many others.

These varied and powerful voices attest to the self-evident reality that racial protections are still needed in voting in this country. As recently as last year’s elections, political partisans resorted to voter suppression laws and tactics aimed at reducing the votes of people of color.

Voting rights protections, which have long served our nation’s commitment to equality and justice, should not be cast aside now. The court has done America a grave disservice, and we will work with our coalition partners to undo the damage inflicted by this retrogressive ruling.

 

Center for Black Equity

CenterLink: The Community of LGBT Centers

The Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals

Equality Federation

Family Equality Council

Freedom to Marry

Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders

Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC)

GLAAD

Human Rights Campaign

Immigration Equality Action Fund

Lambda Legal

National Black Justice Coalition

National Center for Lesbian Rights

National Center for Transgender Equality

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force

National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance

Out & Equal Workplace Advocates

PFLAG – Parents, Families, & Friends of Lesbians and Gays Pride at Work, AFL-CIO

The Trevor Project

Unid@s

 

 

NQAPIA Joins National AAPI Statement About 2012 Elections

NQAPIA joined our colleagues at the National Council of Asian Pacific Americans (NCAPA) in issuing a statement on the 2012 Elections.  The joint statement is on their web site here, and appears below.

National Council of Asian Pacific Americans Congratulates President Obama on his Re-election

Exit Polls: Asian American Voters Prefer Obama by Over 45-Point Margin

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, November 7, 2012
CONTACT: Dana Chapnick

drchapnick@ncapaonline.org

Washington, D.C. – The National Council of Asian Pacific Americans (NCAPA), the nation’s largest coalition of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AA & NHPI) groups, congratulates President Barack Obama on his re-election. 74 percent of AA & NHPI voters cast their ballot for President Obama versus 25 percent for Governor Romney – a 22-point increase from 2008 – according to national exit polling by the Associated Press; and 72 percent versus 26 percent according to the Asian American Election Eve Poll, a joint project of the National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development (National CAPACD) and the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF).

AAs & NHPIs – the fastest growing racial group in the United States – represent 6 percent of the total U.S. population. NCAPA, a project of the Tides Center, and its 31 member organizations are hopeful the Obama Administration will work with the U.S. Congress to address the opportunities and challenges presented in theNCAPA 2012 Policy Platform: Framing Issues and Recommendations to Improve the Lives of Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Communities (available at www.ncapaonline.org).

 

AA & NHPI community members look to President Obama for continued and renewed leadership on several key issue areas: (1) ensuring community members are treated as full and equal members of society through strong protections against discrimination and language access; (2) promoting a lifetime of learning by creating accessible and inclusive educational environments that are informed by disaggregated data on the community; (3) protecting, improving, and fully funding the Affordable Care Act; (4) addressing the needs of low-income community members through community development, asset building, and financial security; and (5) passing Comprehensive Immigration Reform and the DREAM Act.

In addition to addressing the policy issues and recommendations in the NCAPA 2012 Policy Platform, NCAPA strongly believes the Obama Administration needs to work with the AA & NHPI community to continue to strengthen the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Furthermore, NCAPA hopes the Obama Administration will continue to identify, recruit, appoint, and hire qualified AA & NHPI candidates to serve in all levels of government.

Finally, NCAPA would like to welcome all newly elected Members of Congress. Official results have been declared for the following: Congresswoman-elect Tammy Duckworth (IL-8), Senator-elect Mazie Hirono (HI), Congresswoman-elect Tulsi Gabbard (HI-2), Congresswoman-elect Grace Meng (NY-6), and Congressman-elect Mark Takano (CA-41).NCAPA is excited about the added diversity that these newly elected members will bring to the House of Representatives and Senate and looks forward to engaging with these new leaders.

 

At the time of release, the following NCAPACoalition members have signed onto this statement:

  • Asian American Justice Center, Member of Asian American Center for Advancing Justice
  • Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance, AFL-CIO
  • Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy & Leadership
  • Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations
  • Japanese American Citizens League
  • Hmong National Development
  • Laotian American National Alliance
  • National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum
  • National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association
  • National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development
  • National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians
  • South Asian Americans Leading Together
  • Southeast Asia Resource Action Center

 

NQAPIA in San Diego: Election Day and Beyond!

NQAPIA Co-Director Ben de Guzman joins UTOPIA in San Diego this coming week for the 2012 Elections!

NQAPIA is pleased to be working with San Diego to protect our communities’ voices as the Election season culminates and to articulate those voices the day after to examine the results and the new political climate we will find.

Join us for the following events:

Monday, November 5: We will be training volunteers for our exit polling work joining the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund’s Election Protection Program. Come to UCSD at 6pm at 300 Student Center to make sure we’re prepared for Election Day!

Tuesday, November 6: Sign up for a 3 hour shift with a friend for our exit polling work.

RSVP here for Monday and Tuesday: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dGc4elpCaHVldDVtVUhwOTBuT0pZckE6MQ#gid=0

Wednesday, November 7: Catch our post-Election analysis with our friends at the LGBT Center and a host of local organizations. We will have a lively discussion about the results and what they will mean for issues such as immigration and LGBT equality. Check out our Facebook page for more information: http://www.facebook.com/events/291971720914465/

Asian Americans, the Right to Vote, and Same-Sex Marriage

NQAPIA has entered into a strategic partnership with the Asian American Legal Defense and Education to protect the right to vote and gauge Asian American voter opinion on same-sex marriage in the upcoming Presidential Elections. We need your help.

In past elections, Asian Americans have faced a series of barriers in exercising their right to vote. For example, poll workers were hostile and made racist remarks, poll sites had too few interpreters to assist Asian American voters, translated voting materials were missing or hidden from voters, and ballots.

Moreover, Asian American voter attitudes toward LGBT rights have been rarely documented. And when studied, only of America-born, fully English proficient Asian Americans. The community is much larger.

In response, AALDEF has conducted a non-partisan survey of Asian American voters to document voter opinions that can be disaggregated by ethnicity, age, citizenship tenure, etc. AALDEF has also monitored the elections for compliance with the federal Voting Rights Act, which mandates bilingual ballots and forbids anti-Asian voter discrimination.

On November 6, 2012, NQAPIA is partnering with AALDEF to monitor the elections and conduct a non-partisan voter survey at poll sites in Asian American neighborhoods in 14 states. Volunteers are needed to work in 3-hour shifts while polls are open (7:00 AM to 8:00 PM).

There will be a one hour training session for all volunteers. All volunteers must be non-partisan during the time that they help. To sign up, complete the registration form here (Volunteer Form-NQAPIA) or click here to register.

Trainings for AAPI Election Protection Program- This Week!

NQAPIA is a partner with the Election Protection Program with the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  We’re excited to bring our local networks on Election Day to make sure that our communities are best able to take part in the political process.

Your help is needed to make sure this happens!  The exit polls we will help gather ask questions about same sex marriage in Asian American languages- if we don’t have enough volunteers, we will not be able to get the best data directly from our communities in the languages they speak.

Sign up to volunteer here, and attend any of the trainings below.  For more information, contact Ben de Guzman via e-mail at ben_deguzman@nqapia.org.

SCHEDULE OF AALDEF ELECTION PROTECTION PROGRAM TRAININGS

Tues., Oct. 23 – Philadelphia, PA

12N – Duane Morris, 30 South 17th Street, between Chestnut and Market
6PM – Pepper Hamilton, 3000 Two Logan Square, Eighteenth and Arch Streets

6PM – University of Pennsylvania APALSA, Gittis 2

 

Wed., Oct. 24 – Washington, DC

12N – Crowell & Moring, 1001 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, between 10th and 11th Streets

4PM – Georgetown Law School, 600 New Jersey Ave, NW, McDonough, Room 164
6PM – Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, 901 New York Avenue, NW, at K Street

 

Thurs., Oct. 25 – Boston, MA

12N – Ropes & Gray LLP; Prudential Tower, 800 Boylston Street, at Fairfield

2:30PM – Suffolk University Law School,120 Tremont Street, Room 275
6PM – Edwards Wildman Palmer, 111 Huntington Avenue, at Holyoke

 

Fri., Oct. 26 – Boston, MA

12PM – Harvard Law School APALSA

3PM – New England Law, 154 Stuart Street, Room 303

 

Tues., Oct. 30 – New York, NY

6PM – Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom, 4 Times Square, 42nd St. east of Broadway