Posts

NQAPIA Delivers 971 Postcards to Trump to Preserve DACA

Today, the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) delivered 971 postcards from LGBTQ Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, Pacific Islanders (APIs) and allies from across the country urging Mr. Trump and Congress to preserve the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The program has helped thousands of LGBTQ API young people trying to work, study, and improve their lives in this country. The elimination of DACA will take away employment opportunities, educational opportunities, and even the slightest relief from fears of deportation.

APIs are the fastest growing racial group in the United States today and the largest segment of new immigrants. 169,000 APIs are eligible for DACA. There is an estimated 267,000 undocumented immigrants who are LGBTQ, of which a disproportionate share is API. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, about 16,000 people from South Korea, the Philippines, India, and Pakistan have benefitted from DACA.

Glenn D. Magpantay, NQAPIA Executive Director, said: “DACA was never a perfect program, but it was a step in the right direction. President Trump’s mean-spirited cancellation of DACA will force 800,000 people to live in even greater fear. Hard-working DACA young people are the ones who are truly making America great.” For example:

Tony Choi is a 28 year-old, gay, Korean DACA beneficiary from New Jersey. In 2010, his options were to live a closeted life taking care of his mother with cancer in the US or return to Korea where his LGBTQ identity would subject him to harsh hazing for two years in the mandatory military service. Korean military penal law also criminalizes homosexuality. Watch Tony’s story.

Bupendra Ram is a South Asian from Fiji who came to the United States when he was only 2 years old. With the support of his mother, he is the first person in his family to attain a college degree. Read Bupendra’s story.

These stories demonstrate how DACA and other programs have protected LGBTQ APIs from harassment, discrimination, and hardship.

Sasha W., NQAPIA Organizing Director, added: “By taking away DACA, like enacting the Muslim Ban, the Trans Military Ban, and more, Trump continues to make large numbers of the American people vulnerable to continued attacks. We will never stop fighting with and for our undocumented LGBTQ API people, and all queer and trans people of color.”

Magpantay continued, “NQAPIA, which has long fought hard to preserve DACA and for immigrants’ rights, will take our fight to Congress. We urge Congress to codify DACA into law.”

Take Action

Sign the National Immigration Law Center petition to help defend DACA.

#HereToStay nqapia.org/uncovering-our-stories #DefendDACA

#QueerAzaadi: A National Call for Mourning, Action, & Celebration on 9/11

 #QueerAzaadi // Queer Liberation

A National Call for Action, Mourning, & Celebration on the Weekend of 9/11

Ava Le’Ray Barrin, 17 years old.
Nabra Hassanen, 17 years old.
Jaquarrius Holland, 18 years old.
Srinivas Kuchibhotla, 32 years old.

These are just a few of the people that our communities have lost to hate crimes and state violence this year. 2017 has seen a rise in the murders of Black trans women, of Black people killed by police violence, of Muslims and those mistaken for Muslim killed in Islamophobic hate crimes. As queer and trans Muslims, South Asians, and APIs, we know that these forms of violence are connected. We cannot separate being harassed because of our gender identities from being harassed because of the color of our skin. Transphobia, islamophobia, anti-Blackness, and xenophobia all reinforce each other in our lives.

#QueerAzaadi

This is the year of Trump’s election and the Muslim Ban. This is a year that trans people have fought multiple attacks on our humanity. This is a year that anti-Muslim hate groups have multiplied in a way we haven’t experienced since September 11th, 2001. 9/11 is certainly not the only moment that marks the policing, profiling and surveillance of our communities. Yet agencies such as the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), policies such as the PATRIOT Act, and registries such as the National Security Entry – Exit Registration System (NSEERS) grew from the Islamophobia that followed that day. These policies are Islamophobic, transphobic, xenophobic, anti-Black forms of state violence that have only multiplied in the last 16 years.

 

For this reason, we will mark the 16th anniversary of 9/11 with a national day of

ACTION

to lift up our voices and create empowering space led by trans and queer Muslims

MOURNING

for all those who have been taken from us too soon

& CELEBRATING

our resistance, resilience, and survival

 

We will lift up the names of all of our people who have been lost to state-sanctioned violence and hate crimes – whether at the hands of law enforcement, immigration enforcement, vigilantes, or white supremacists. And, we will celebrate ourselves on 9/11: our lives, our stories, and our resistance as LGBTQ people of color, in struggle towards #QueerAzaadi / Liberation.

Will you join us?

We have actions planned in Austin, Boston, Chicago, DC, Los Angeles, New Orleans, and Philadelphia.

Click on your city to get involved. Email sasha@nqapia.org for more details, and if you or your organization is willing to lead an action in your city!

Virtual Support

Want to support this weekend of action for #QueerAzaadi, but can’t come to an event in person? We would love your support by amplifying our work through social media!

We’d love for trans and queer Muslims to take over social media on Sunday 9/10 at 5PT / 7CT / 8ET. Can you join us?

Click this link to find sample tweets and posts. We’ll also have pictures from our actions in Los Angeles, Washington DC, Boston, and Austin on our social media by then as well – we’d really appreciate a repost!

Click to view select photos and reflections from many of the actions.

In the News

Check out these articles from Colorlines and the Washington Blade.

Our Goals

  • Reclaiming spaces in which we are normally terrorized: creating spaces that feel empowering for QT Muslim/South Asian/Brown/Black folks on 9/11
  • Lifting up Queer Muslim voices: creating a narrative shift by centering queer and trans Muslim voices in our communities and in media on 9/11
  • Shifting narrative around hate crimes: connecting systems of Islamophobia, transphobia, xenophobia and anti-Blackness in words and actions
  • Building our own capacity: creating safer space for our people to try on planning and being part of direct action
  • Organizing visible mass resistance to the Muslim Ban, and the whole surveillance/security state apparatus, before the SCOTUS hearing on Oct 10th

Partners

#VigilantLove Coalition
18 Million Rising
Advocates for Youth

APALA
API Equality LA
API Equality Northern California

API Resistance
Asian American Resource Workshop
DC Justice for Muslims
Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement
Gender Justice LA

GetEQUAL

GSA Network
hotpot!
Invisible 2 Invincible: API Pride of Chicago
Justice Warriors for Black Lives
KhushATX
KhushDC
Muslim Justice League
National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development
Nikkei Progressives
Philly South Asian Coalition
QAPA
Queer Muslims of Boston
Satrang
South Asian Americans Leading Together
Southerners on New Ground
SWANA – LA
Transgender Law Center
Trikone Chicago
Tuesday Night Project
UndocuBlack Network
Washington Peace Center
White People for Black Lives – LA

#QueerAzaadi #NQAPIA

Media Release: NQAPIA Hails Federal Appeals Court for Striking Down Trump’s Anti-Muslim Travel Ban

NQAPIA MEDIA RELEASE
For Immediate Release: Thursday, May 25, 2017
For More Information, Contact: Glenn Magpantay, 917-439-3158, glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org

 

NQAPIA Hails Federal Appeals Court for Striking Down Trump’s Anti-Muslim Travel Ban

NQAPIA’s LGBT Amicus Brief Available at: bit.ly/hawaiivtrump

Today, a federal appeals court on the East Coast upheld a lower court’s ruling blocking President Donald Trump’s anti-Muslim travel ban.  A federal appeals court on the West Coast is considering the same.

A jubilant Glenn D. Magpantay, the Executive Director of the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance, hailed the decision saying, “Trump’s Executive Orders threatens the lives of immigrants and refugees from all walks of life. The anti-Muslim and anti-refugee ban will have a direct impact on the lives of LGBT people and tears families apart”

The ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Forth Circuit upholds a lower court’s decision in Virginia to halt core portions of the executive order indefinitely.  Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit heard oral arguments appealing a lower court’s decision in Seattle that also blocked President Trump’s anti-Muslim travel ban which bars people from certain majority Muslim countries coming to the United States and delays all refugee entries.

NQAPIA and the NYC Gay & Lesbian Anti Violence Project and Immigration Equality, with the pro bono assistance of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP, filed an amicus (“friend of the court”) brief illustrating the impact of Trump’s Executive Orders on the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Brief is here: bit.ly/hawaiivtrump.

NQAPIA received several complaints and provided legal assistance to LGBT Muslim people and allies who were caught up Trump’s orders.

More information about the original brief can be found here:http://www.nqapia.org/wpp/hi-v-trump/

The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) is a nationwide federation of LGBT Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) organizations. We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBT AAPI groups, develop leadership, and expand collaborations to better challenges anti-LGBT bias and racism.

# # #

NQAPIA Urges Federal Appeals Court to Oppose Trump’s Anti-Muslim Travel Ban

MEDIA RELEASE
For Immediate Release: Monday, May 15, 2017 at 9:30 a.m. PT EMBARGOED
For More Information, Contact: Glenn Magpantay, 917-439-3158, glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org

NQAPIA Urges Federal Appeals Court to Oppose Trump’s Anti-Muslim Travel Ban

NQAPIA’s Amicus Brief Available at: bit.ly/hawaiivtrump

Seattle, WA Today, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit will hear oral arguments in the case Hawaii v. Trump. The case challenges President Trump’s anti-Muslim travel ban which bars people from certain Muslim-majority countries and delays all refugees from coming to the United States.

The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA), the NYC Gay & Lesbian Anti Violence Project (AVP), and Immigration Equality, with the pro bono assistance of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP, filed an amicus (“friend of the court”) brief in the case illustrating the impact of Trump’s Executive Orders on the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) community. Brief is here: bit.ly/hawaiivtrump.

NQAPIA received several complaints and provided legal assistance to LGBTQ Muslim people and others who were caught up in Trump’s orders. A federal court in Hawaii suspended the Executive Orders. That order is on appeal to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

“Trump’s Executive Orders threaten the lives of immigrants and refugees from all walks of life. Our brief shows the Court how the anti-Muslim and anti-refugee ban have a direct impact on the lives of LGBTQ people and tears families apart,” said Glenn D. Magpantay, NQAPIA Executive Director.

The brief shows that many LGBTQ people live in countries, including those named in the EO, where homosexuality is criminalized. The EO prevents those who are fleeing oppression due to their sexual orientation or gender identity from entering the U.S. Barring their entry or simply delaying their application for refugee status prevents them from escaping persecution in their home countries or in refugee camps abroad.

Moreover, the brief illustrates the direct impact on the U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents (“LPRs”) who have LGBTQ family members who are seeking refuge in the United States. If the EO goes into effect, U.S. citizens and LPRs will be deprived of their constitutionally-protected liberty and interests in maintaining familial relationships with their loved ones. For those citizens and LPRs with LGBTQ family members whose safety is jeopardized by their sexual orientation or gender identity, the threat to these constitutional liberty interests will be particularly profound.

The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) is a nationwide federation of LGBTQ Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) organizations. We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBTQ AAPI groups, develop leadership, and expand collaborations to better challenge queerphobia and racism.

# # #

#NQAPIA bit.ly/hawaiivtrump #MediaRelease

NQAPIA Blasts Trump’s Executive Order on Immigration

MEDIA RELEASE for January 26, 2017
Contact: Sasha W., NQAPIA Organizing Director, 909-343-2219, sasha@nqapia.org

NQAPIA Blasts Trump’s Executive Order on Immigration

The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance blasted Mr. Trump’s executive orders calling them “detrimental to the interest of the American public—immigrants and citizens alike,” according to Glenn D. Magpantay, NQAPIA’s Executive Director.

Yesterday, Mr. Trump authorized spending U.S. tax dollars on building a wall between the U.S. and Mexico, notwithstanding that net migration from Mexico has decreased over the last 10 years. He decreed the creation of more detention centers, 5,000 additional border patrol agents, and a reinstatement of 287(g) that requires local police enforcement of complicated federal immigration laws. His orders threaten to cut all federal funding from sanctuary cities and to reinstate Secure Communities, a deportation program that was discontinued due to ineffectiveness and increased distrust among immigrant communities.

Today, NQAPIA is anticipating that Mr. Trump will fulfill his campaign promise of implementing a Muslim ban. For 30 days, individuals from Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Sudan, Iraq, and Iran will be banned from entering the U.S., simply because they live in Muslim-majority countries. Individuals from these countries will be unable to receive visas, even if they are already approved, intend to seek asylum, or have family members in the U.S. For 120 days, no refugees from these same countries will be allowed to enter the U.S. The only exception will be refugees who are religious minorities in their countries—in other words, refugees who are not Muslim.

Sasha W., NQAPIA’s Organizing Director, said, “Building a wall, constructing detention centers, and banning Muslims does not make us safer. Instead, these executive actions demonize and criminalize our communities. Trump campaigned on Islamophobia, xenophobia, racism, anti-LGBT bigotry, misogyny, and ableism—not facts or policy. Our communities have already faced significant backlash during his campaign; now, the hate violence is solidifying into federal policy.”

In NQAPIA’s #RedefineSecurity Week of Action, during the beginning stages of Mr. Trump’s campaign, NQAPIA lifted up the stories of institutional Islamophobic and xenophobic hate violence against our LGBTQ API communities. We told the stories of an Indian transwoman harassed by immigration officials; a Pakistani traveler being invasively examined by TSA, in her body and belongings; a queer South Asian organizer whose home was raided; and a Bangladeshi traveler who has been on the “no-fly list” since she was a child.

Last year, in the midst of this national uptick in hate and vigilante violence, NQAPIA submitted a model guidance to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), urging DHS to adopt protections against profiling on the basis of gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, national origin, and religion. Instead, Mr. Trump is doing the opposite—he is choosing to embolden the white nationalist, Islamophobic, and xenophobic elements of his campaign.

Sasha W. concluded, “Mr. Trump is continuing to enact policies that simply do not work and that make our communities feel more unsafe in this country.”

If you want to take action against these policies, get trained with us! Sign up for NQAPIA’s direct action organizing series (in Los Angeles, Oakland, Seattle, DC, Philadelphia, New York City, and Chicago) at bit.ly/datrainings.

###

#NoBanNoWall #RedefineSecurity #NotOurPresident

We’re Thankful for these Precautions before Trump Takes Office

There are a number of measures that LGBTQ APIs should do to protect themselves and their families under a Trump Administration. NQAPIA has consulted with immigration lawyers, public policy experts, and other attorneys to identify issues of particular importance to LGBTQ Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders.

Many of these applications will not be granted until after Trump takes office. But, even if Trump tries to eliminate everything that we have won, it is virtually impossible for changes to be retroactive. Applications filed today will be decided and granted on the basis of the laws and rules while Obama is in office. So, take care of these soon.


Transgender LGBTQ APIs

Apply or Update Passport

passportPresident Obama’s administration allowed for people to change and update their federally-issued identity documents, including gender-marker on passport and names on social security cards. Trump has vowed to eliminate all of Obama’s executive directives on January 20. You must apply and make and changes now. Adult passports last 10 years, so they will outlive a Trump presidency.

Apply for Passport from the U.S. State Department


Young Undocumented Immigrants

Renew DACA

President Obama created the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program by executive order so that undocumented young people could be free from deportation and gain work authorization. Trump has given mixed messages on DACA, and at one point, he stated he has “no problem” with it.

If you are fearful about what Trump will do with current DACA enrollees, know that NQAPIA, countless advocacy organizations, and high powered lawyers will do everything that we can to protect you and your family.

If you have DACA now but it will expire in the next 6 months, file a mandatory renewal now. Not filing a renewal could subject you to noncompliance and makes you a higher priority for investigation. Those who follow the rules, as they are now, are less likely to be gone after.

If you have never applied for DACA, you should consult with an immigration attorney before filing a new application. Click here to find an attorney.


Health Insurance through Obamacare

Apply Now


www.healthcare.gov
Apply for Obamacare
Update your Obamacare Plan

If you do not have health insurance, you should apply for Obamacare through the federal system or one of your state health exchanges. Open Enrollment is now. Although Trump and Congressional leaders have promised to eliminate the Affordable Care Act, that will not happen at least for another year. The more people who are in the system now, the more difficult it will be to get rid of the system. Efforts to repeal may also “grandfather” current enrollees and allow them to maintain their health insurance while declining to take any new people.


Immigrants Eligible for Green Cards or Naturalization

Apply Now

Green Card ExampleIf you are eligible for a green card or eligible to become a U.S. citizen, you should file your application now. They take several months to process, but becoming a permanent resident or a citizen substantially increases your security to live in America. If you have any criminal history or entered the U.S. without permission, consult an attorney before filing any paperwork.


LGBTQ Immigrants Seeking Asylum

Apply Now

LGBTQ people are persecuted in many countries in Asia and the Pacific. Foreign nationals may seek political asylum in the United States based on the sexual orientation or gender-identity. But, federal law has a strict one-year time limitation for people to file an application from the date of entry. This cannot be undone by Trump. If you are seeking political asylum you should consult with an attorney, and apply now.


Same-Sex Marriage is Safe

Don’t Get Married if You Don’t Want To

Graphic of the White House in Rainbow ColorsThe right for same-sex couples to legally marry was decided by the US Supreme Court and is based on the US Constitution. Trump cannot undo marriages or take the right away. Even if he appoints an anti-marriage Supreme Court Justice, the majority of justices that ruled twice in favor of marriage equality will remain on the Court. There is no need to rush to get married now.


LGBTQ APIs with Children

Protect Your Relationship with Them

If you have a child, you should apply for a second-parent adoption or a joint adoption if you do not have a legally recognized relationship to the child, like birth. Even if your name is listed on the child’s birth certificate, that may not be enough.


Personal Protections

last will and testamentTrump may eliminate the Obama Administration’s hospital visitation policy. So, it is prudent to have family planning protections in the event of a tragedy. This includes a Last Will and Testament, Health Care Proxies, Medical and Financial Powers of Attorney, designation of guardians, and Living Wills. It is not limited to couples but includes single people and people in more dynamic relationship and family structures.


Need a Lawyer?

Ask Us

The above are prudent steps to take, but everyone’s legal situation is different.
To speak with an attorney for a legal consultation, complete NQAPIA’s Legal Intake Form, or find an attorney from this list.No Human is Illegal

View this message as an email

2016 November Elections

The November election is critical. The Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community is made up of 9.3 million eligible voters, and 90% of those who are registered will vote. In many places, AAPIs create the margin of victory. Learn more statistics with our voter infographicsYour vote matters, and we want you to be prepared for the election on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

Voter Guide

nqapia-voter-guide-checklistWe created a voter guide that shows the views of Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump on LGBTQ equality, trans* justice, racial justice, AAPI issues, and immigrants’ rights. Our research came from the candidates’ official policy statements and quotes from news media. View our voter guide, and click the links below for PDF copies:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide
NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide in Chinese
NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide in Hindi
NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide in Korean
NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide in Vietnamese

NQAPIA is an independent, nonpartisan, tax-exempt, nonprofit organization and does not endorse any candidate or political party.

Learn the Issues

Even if you feel dismayed by the presidential election, there are many more issues on your local ballots. Learn more about your local politics at Ballotpedia.

Protect our Rights

AALDEF - The Asian American VoteWhen reporting on the election, news media overlooks AAPIs—except when we are the butt of their jokes. (Sign a petition against The O’Reilly Factor’s racist segment on Watter’s World.) Even at the polls, AAPIs have faced a series of segregated barriers, including segregated “Asian” voting lines.

 

Join us in conducting a non-partisan survey of Asian American voters to document Asian American voting patterns and documenting instances of anti-Asian voter disenfranchisement by volunteering with  AALDEF on Election Day. Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) needs volunteers in DC, CA, FL, GA, LA, MA, MD, MI, NJ, NM, NV, NY, PA, TX, and VA.

Register to Vote

You may still have time to register to vote in your state! Find out and register online by clicking the image below or going to bit.ly/nqapia16. This application is available in 13 languages.

Register to vote at bit.ly/nqapia16.

2016 Voter Guide

Click the links below for PDF copies and translations of this voter guide:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide ~ Chinese ~ Hindi ~ Korean ~ Vietnamese

nqapia-voter-guide-pg1-reminders

Click the links below for PDF copies and translations of this voter guide:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide ~ Chinese ~ Hindi ~ Korean ~ Vietnamese

nqapia-voter-guide-checklist

Click the links below for PDF copies and translations of this voter guide:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide ~ Chinese ~ Hindi ~ Korean ~ Vietnamese

nqapia-voter-guide-details

nqapia-voter-guide-pg4-facts-disclaimers

Click the links below for PDF copies and translations of this voter guide:

NQAPIA 2016 Presidential Voter Guide ~ Chinese ~ Hindi ~ Korean ~ Vietnamese