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Report Profiling

To report/file a complaint about your own experiences with racial or religious profiling, check out the resources below.

#RedefineSecurity: Sasha, 26 (NQAPIA)

Sasha“The last time I flew to New York City, I was stopped by TSA, which is a regular occurrence. This time though, for reasons I can’t explain, I was led away from the security checkpoint and into a room: a tiny storage closet with blocked out windows.

The only sign in the room was a piece of paper saying that any kind of recording is prohibited. I was trying and failing to stay calm, alone with two TSA agents in a tiny space where nobody could see inside. I felt like anything could happen to me, and nobody would know.

In the end, nothing out of the ordinary happened. They thoroughly patted me down just like every other time. I don’t know why they felt the need to take me away from the LAX crowds, into a special room. But I do know that because of my queer, gender non-conforming, South Asian body – I was seen as a threat.

It’s these experiences that lead me to organize in queer and trans* API and South Asian communities, and to organize in solidarity with all Black and brown people, until we all get free.

That is why I believe that we need to #RedefineSecurity and #StopProfilingImmigrants.”

#RedefineSecurity: Sahar Shafqat, 44 (Washington DC)

Sahar Shafqat“When I was on my way to India with Sapna, my wife, we received boarding passes with a quadruple S (SSSS) security code. I had received that code before, so we knew: it’s going to be one of those security experiences. A TSA agent opened up a security line just for us. Each of us needed to go through the security x-ray machine alone, and we could not stand near each other. That was very isolating. I could see my wife, Sapna, being physically checked very thoroughly, and then her belongings checked very thoroughly. This is somebody who is my life partner, who I love, who I’m very protective of. And I watched her privacy and her person being violated, and I was helpless. I couldn’t do anything about it, because in this system, this is the way she’s supposed to be treated.

Then it was my turn. Sapna was clearly very upset, very angry and very shaken. I ask her if she’s okay and shesays yes, but not very convincingly. A female agent starts doing a pat-down on me, but it’s not like a pat-down you’ve ever experienced. It’s very invasive – really being touched in an intimate way. It’s not just about checking your pockets, it’s really going all the way up the inside of your leg to your pelvis. She said “I’m going to take my hand all the way up until I can’t go anymore,” and that’s really what it was. Even my short hair was manually checked with the TSA agent using her gloved hands and fingers, adding to the humiliation.

All of our belongings were assumed to be suspect – it was presumption of guilt, and the burden was on us to prove otherwise. I had a computer that had to be turned on. Every single item was individually checked – forexample, every single credit card inside my wallet was pulled out and manually checked. That was how invasive the check was. For brown and black people in America, our bodies are constructed as dangerous, as almost superhuman. The idea that we are strange beings that can somehow evade the normal screening process is racist. The thought is that I must be hiding some explosives in my computer or in some orifice of mine, just because I’m brown and traveling to Pakistan. That’s where I’m from. And that’s probably what’s got us on the list, because we go frequently. Pakistan is another home for us.

That is why I believe that we need to #RedefineSecurity and #StopProfilingImmigrants.”

#RedefineSecurity: Kevin Lam, 26 (QAPA Boston & NQAPIA)

Kevin Lam“In 2013, as Khmer New Year in Providence, RI was wrapping up, my co-worker was stopped by police.

My co-worker and I were the main transportation for young people we worked with to get home after the event. When I saw that my co-worker had been stopped, I made a u-turn to check-in on her and the youth. As I pulled up, a police officer approached my car. I told him that I wanted to check to see if my co-worker and our young people were okay, and to see if I could at least get some of the youth home since it was late. The police officer told me, “I don’t know who you are,” and demanded that I “get the hell out of here or else…”

After dropping off all the young people in my car, my co-worker called asking me if I could come back because the police were towing her car. They didn’t give her any time to coordinate rides for our young people to get home, so they were left waiting on the side of the street for friends and community members to pick them up to get them home safely.

After everything happened, I felt hopeless, and angry that I couldn’t do anything to help in that moment. Because of my skin color, I know there is a level of privilege and access that I have, and I was able to use that to keep some young people safe from police harassment.

But it still hurts and makes me angry to see that as reasonable and calm as I tried to be with the police, they did not care. They did not care about our young people who we wanted to get home safe, and they didn’t care about leaving people on the side of the street stranded. In the end, we were able to take care of our people and community, while the police did nothing to protect our people and community, or make sure we were safe.

That is why I believe we need to#RedefineSecurity and #StopProfilingImmigrants.”

#RedefineSecurity: Jyoti Chand, 33 (Stop LAPD Spying Coalition)

Jyoti Chand“I am a coordinating team member of Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, an anti-state violence and anti-police spying coalition.

In 2014, my apartment was broken into. My laptop, which I use for my community organizing work, and my paper notes, to document the use of human and electronic surveillance by the police, were stolen. I felt violated in my home, my space safe.

Soon after, a person who befriended me within the coalition space, was invited by me to my home. We went outside of my apartment unit. When she saw a police helicopter, she remarked ‘we should shoot it down.’ It felt as if she were luring me into self incrimination. I trusted my instinct to protect myself and knew I was not safe. Soon after, she disappeared and stopped communicating with our coalition.

Sharing my story empowers me and others in the community to speak up and protect our ourselves from the architecture of state violence, spying, surveillance and infiltration.

Will we sleep or will we fight?”

#RedefineSecurity #StopProfilingImmigrants

#RedefineSecurity: Fa’afetai Alofa

“I remember the moment the undercover cop pulled out his badge and told me I was going to be arrested. I experienced a mix of things; shock, self disgust, disbelief, shame, and an overwhelming numbness.

As a Samoan trans woman, at the age of 23, just a few months after completing my bachelors degree, I was arrested for prostitution.

It wasn’t long until a few other undercover cops made themselves known, and within seconds I was in a van, alone, with 5 cops. As I was checked into the holding facility a male cop was assigned to pat me down. He misgendered me and asked that I remove my bra. This terrified me for so many reasons, but mainly because my bra was such a huge part of what affirmed my femininity for me. Thankfully a female cop noticed I was uncomfortable with that request and told me I could leave it on. As I waited for my sister to bail me out, I sat in a cell for an hour, without anything but four walls, silence, and my self-hating thoughts to keep me company.

Sex workers pose a very low risk to society. We are not murderers, or thieves, or drug dealers, yet police departments dedicate whole sting operations to criminalizing us for trying to survive in a system that forces us into sex work.

We need to #redefinesecurity so the most disenfranchised in society aren’t being targeted by the system. We get enough of that from the people who actually pose a threat to society: the ones who harass trans women of color and follow through with killing us.

Target them.”

#RedefineSecurity #StopProfilingImmigrants

#RedefineSecurity: August Guang, 26 (PRYSM & NQAPIA)

August Guang“I was 19 when the TSA started using full body scanners in 2010. I found myself suddenly under their microscope. Until then I had gone through with relative ease – though my suitcase was often searched because of my mom’s import business – because as an East Asian U.S. citizen I didn’t fit the profile of a terrorist. Now, for some reason I could never pass by their scanners, always being subjected to invasive pat-downs and searches, having officers reach into my pants and up into my shirt and even up into my binder, walking through the same scanner multiple times and holding everyone else up in line.

It wasn’t until I was 21 and on my way to an interview that I realized what was going on. The TSA agent made me walk through the scanner 3 times, as she got more and more confused. She called over another TSA agent, and they were discussing how there must be a bug in the system. She had me walk through it again, and when she asked me to go through it a fifth time I said no, I didn’t get why. At that point she realized what it was – she had been pressing the blue button for Male the whole time.

I identify as gender non-conforming and masculine of center, and was assigned female at birth, so to her I appeared male. The scanner kept signaling about my breasts in two evenly spaced yellow boxes. When she heard my high pitched voice, she started apologizing. I realized that every time I had ever failed the TSA checkpoints was because of arbitrary decisions that TSA agents made about my gender identity and the way body scanners were set up. TSA didn’t keep me safe, it just humiliated me for the last 6 years.

That’s why I believe we need to #RedefineSecurity and #StopProfilingImmigrants.”

#RedefineSecurity: Alina Bee, 26 (Satrang LA)

“Abbu was always frustrated by my shalwared prancing. He said they made me look unprofessional and no one would take me seriously in the world. Much to his chagrin, I’ve just about made a uniform of them and the TSA takes me very seriously.

One particular instance sticks out and it happened to be when the both of us were traveling together. Security at LAX was exceptionally interested in my shalwar and dupatta, despite the body scanner coming back with nothing but intricate sindhi patterns weaved across yards of linen. Maybe that was it, they just wanted to grasp the cultures and stories that lay in the threads.

So after the scanner told them nothing, a TSA agent took it upon herself to dig deeper and proceeded to scrunch and shake my shalwar in hopes that a frayed edge might unravel and they could piece together the puzzle in their minds. When that gave them nothing, they took my dupatta and shook it out. Still nothing. So they reached higher and patted down my hair–which only prickled and frizzed in response.

After exhausting all their attempts to fit me in the picture they had pre-developed, they let me go and I huffed my way to the gate. This experience was nothing remotely close to the scrutiny and intimidation faced by many of my colleagues, friends, family members–but this was a microcosm of the ‘safety’ systems that interrogate and deem our bodies unsafe or threatening.

That is why I believe we need to #RedefineSecurity and #StopProfilingImmigrants.”

NQAPIA and APALA Condemn Administration’s Rollback on Transgender Protections

For immediate release: February 24, 2017

Media contacts: Sasha W., 909-343-2219, sasha@nqapia.org
Marian Manapsal, 202-508-3733, mmanapsal@apalanet.org

NQAPIA and APALA Condemn Administration’s Rollback on Transgender Protections

Washington, DC – This week, the Trump Administration issued rollbacks on guidance provided under the Obama Administration that allowed transgender students to use the restrooms matching their gender identity. The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) and the Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance, AFL-CIO (APALA) condemn these rollbacks that signal the administration’s betrayal of transgender and gender non-conforming students who deserve to go to school free from bullying and hate.
“Implementing policies that make our kids in public schools even less safe is reprehensible,” declared NQAPIA Organizing Director Sasha W. “Every child deserves to attend school without fear of discrimination, no matter where they are in the country. This a continuation of the administration’s attack on trans people – trans and gender nonconforming people were affected by the Muslim ban, by the escalation of this country’s deportation machine, and by the increase of power in the hands of police. This administration shamelessly continues to enact policies that simply do not work and that make our communities feel more unsafe in this country.”

“Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos did nothing to stop this rollback from happening,” added Monica Thammarath, APALA 1st Vice President and Senior Liaison at the National Education Association, the nation’s largest labor union advancing public education. “Now more than ever, we are calling on all states, school districts, and educators to support their students and double down on their own efforts to reject hate and discrimination. With DeVos at the head of the U.S. Department of Education, our organizing and advocacy becomes that much more important.”

Johanna Puno Hester, APALA National President and Assistant Executive Director of the United Domestic Workers, AFSCME Local 3930, stated: “Though this is a devastating blow to our public schools, NQAPIA and APALA will continue to fight for AAPI- and all transgender and nonconforming people because it’s evident that the federal government sure as hell won’t. An attack on one of us is an attack on all, and we will resist all policies and attempts that heighten transphobia, xenophobia, white nationalism, and hate.”

Gregory A. Cendana, APALA Executive Director, concluded: “A little more than a month into his administration, we have already seen LGBTQ, Muslim, immigrant and refugee communities under attack by the administration. This is fascism at work, and we will do everything in our power to resist, organize and fight back against policies that undermine and endanger the margins of our communities.”

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We’re Thankful for these Precautions before Trump Takes Office

There are a number of measures that LGBTQ APIs should do to protect themselves and their families under a Trump Administration. NQAPIA has consulted with immigration lawyers, public policy experts, and other attorneys to identify issues of particular importance to LGBTQ Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders.

Many of these applications will not be granted until after Trump takes office. But, even if Trump tries to eliminate everything that we have won, it is virtually impossible for changes to be retroactive. Applications filed today will be decided and granted on the basis of the laws and rules while Obama is in office. So, take care of these soon.


Transgender LGBTQ APIs

Apply or Update Passport

passportPresident Obama’s administration allowed for people to change and update their federally-issued identity documents, including gender-marker on passport and names on social security cards. Trump has vowed to eliminate all of Obama’s executive directives on January 20. You must apply and make and changes now. Adult passports last 10 years, so they will outlive a Trump presidency.

Apply for Passport from the U.S. State Department


Young Undocumented Immigrants

Renew DACA

President Obama created the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program by executive order so that undocumented young people could be free from deportation and gain work authorization. Trump has given mixed messages on DACA, and at one point, he stated he has “no problem” with it.

If you are fearful about what Trump will do with current DACA enrollees, know that NQAPIA, countless advocacy organizations, and high powered lawyers will do everything that we can to protect you and your family.

If you have DACA now but it will expire in the next 6 months, file a mandatory renewal now. Not filing a renewal could subject you to noncompliance and makes you a higher priority for investigation. Those who follow the rules, as they are now, are less likely to be gone after.

If you have never applied for DACA, you should consult with an immigration attorney before filing a new application. Click here to find an attorney.


Health Insurance through Obamacare

Apply Now


www.healthcare.gov
Apply for Obamacare
Update your Obamacare Plan

If you do not have health insurance, you should apply for Obamacare through the federal system or one of your state health exchanges. Open Enrollment is now. Although Trump and Congressional leaders have promised to eliminate the Affordable Care Act, that will not happen at least for another year. The more people who are in the system now, the more difficult it will be to get rid of the system. Efforts to repeal may also “grandfather” current enrollees and allow them to maintain their health insurance while declining to take any new people.


Immigrants Eligible for Green Cards or Naturalization

Apply Now

Green Card ExampleIf you are eligible for a green card or eligible to become a U.S. citizen, you should file your application now. They take several months to process, but becoming a permanent resident or a citizen substantially increases your security to live in America. If you have any criminal history or entered the U.S. without permission, consult an attorney before filing any paperwork.


LGBTQ Immigrants Seeking Asylum

Apply Now

LGBTQ people are persecuted in many countries in Asia and the Pacific. Foreign nationals may seek political asylum in the United States based on the sexual orientation or gender-identity. But, federal law has a strict one-year time limitation for people to file an application from the date of entry. This cannot be undone by Trump. If you are seeking political asylum you should consult with an attorney, and apply now.


Same-Sex Marriage is Safe

Don’t Get Married if You Don’t Want To

Graphic of the White House in Rainbow ColorsThe right for same-sex couples to legally marry was decided by the US Supreme Court and is based on the US Constitution. Trump cannot undo marriages or take the right away. Even if he appoints an anti-marriage Supreme Court Justice, the majority of justices that ruled twice in favor of marriage equality will remain on the Court. There is no need to rush to get married now.


LGBTQ APIs with Children

Protect Your Relationship with Them

If you have a child, you should apply for a second-parent adoption or a joint adoption if you do not have a legally recognized relationship to the child, like birth. Even if your name is listed on the child’s birth certificate, that may not be enough.


Personal Protections

last will and testamentTrump may eliminate the Obama Administration’s hospital visitation policy. So, it is prudent to have family planning protections in the event of a tragedy. This includes a Last Will and Testament, Health Care Proxies, Medical and Financial Powers of Attorney, designation of guardians, and Living Wills. It is not limited to couples but includes single people and people in more dynamic relationship and family structures.


Need a Lawyer?

Ask Us

The above are prudent steps to take, but everyone’s legal situation is different.
To speak with an attorney for a legal consultation, complete NQAPIA’s Legal Intake Form, or find an attorney from this list.No Human is Illegal

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