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Media Release: Time to Close the Immigration Loophole and End Illegal Profiling

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DECEMBER 23, 2016

TIME TO CLOSE THE IMMIGRATION LOOPHOLE AND END ILLEGAL PROFILING

Advocates submit policy guidance to DHS to close profiling loophole
At critical moment, as Obama Administration dismantles Muslim special registry, guidelines to end profiling in immigration enforcement gains urgency, momentum

Today, the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) submitted a widely supported policy guidance to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to prohibit profiling on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, religion, language, sexual orientation, and gender identity.  Staff from the President’s Domestic Policy Council requested the model guidance language, after a year of relentless advocacy by NQAPIA.

In this time of political uncertainty and uneasiness, the administration’s dismantling of the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS) – which gave rise to “special registration” that targeted Muslims and devastated immigrant communities after the September 11 attacks – was welcomed by advocates.

“The LGBTQ communities of color that NQAPIA represents have faced an unprecedented acceleration of violence and continue to be mistreated and singled out at airports, their neighborhoods, and peaceful gatherings,” said Sasha W., NQAPIA Organizing Director.

”Now is the time for DHS to build upon the elimination of National Security Entry-Exit Registration System and close the loophole to prohibit profiling in immigration enforcement,“ said Glenn Magpantay, NQAPIA Executive Director.

He continued, “Currently there is no policy against profiling in immigration enforcement.  The U.S Department of Justice issued a guidance in 2014 barring profiling, but exempted the Department of Homeland Security and its agencies. As a matter of federal public policy, it is actually permissible for TSA, ICE, and CBP to assert that someone is a threat based on no other information other than what is profiled.”

A model for change

For the past year, racial justice and immigrant rights advocates have been pushing to close this gaping loophole.  To assist in DHS in is effort, NQAPIA developed the model guidance language to enact desperately needed protections against profiling.

The model guidance prohibits DHS and its agencies from using race, ethnicity, gender, national origin, language, religion, sexual orientation, or gender identity as the sole basis for monitoring, investigating, stopping, detaining, questioning, or searching an individual, or placing an individual into detention or removal proceedings.  It also details:

  • Examples of inappropriate uses of profiling in border security, national security, and state and local law enforcement.
  • A complaint process for addressing allegations of profiling.
  • A remedy for when inappropriate profiling is used. Resulting detention or deportation should be deemed improper and revoked, as already exists in criminal proceedings where wrongfully obtained evidence is suppressed.

Racial profiling has been used in federal programs that have ravaged communities of color such as the “War on Drugs,” “War on Terror,” and in immigration enforcement abuses that created laws like Arizona’s SB1070 and other collaborations between Immigration Customs and Enforcement (ICE) and local law enforcement.

Profiling has been widely rejected both on moral grounds and because of its ineffectiveness. Republican President George W. Bush issued the first set of federal guidance barring profiling in law enforcement in 2003.  There is widespread and bipartisan support against profiling and support for closing the DOJ loophole.

To that end, NQAPIA delivered over a thousand postcards and hundreds of e-petition signatures to DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson, demonstrating mass-based support for the end of profiling in DHS. NQAPIA also organized a protest on the 15th anniversary of 9/11 demanding an end to legalized profiling.

“There is no more urgent time than now to close the profiling loophole and end illegal profiling. We urge the President to take immediate action on this issue,” concluded Magpantay.

Contact: Glenn D. Magpantay, NQAPIA Executive Director, glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org

917-439-3158

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The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) is a federation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) organizations.  We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBT AAPI groups, develop leadership, promote visibility, educate our community, enhance grassroots organizing, expand collaborations, and challenge homophobia and racism.

Thank You for Supporting our Plans for Next Year

Thanks for your support on Giving Tuesday!

It’s not too late to give! Donate at www.nqapia.org/donate.

Thanks to #GivingTuesday, 52 people donated online for a total of $5,055! Thank you so much for your generous support. This means that we are more than halfway to our end-of-year goal!

We're halfway to our end-of-year fundraising goal!
If you haven’t donated, will you please support our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community for 2017?

After the November election, it’s so important that we continue to support each other and ramp up the work we do for our community. Here is what your donation will support:

 

Attorney Referral Network

With a variety of precautions to take before and after the inauguration, we are growing our attorney referral network. If you need help now, find an attorney here. If you’d like to volunteer to help, we are still accepting attorneys.

Racial Justice Convening

We will host a convening of racial justice activists, tentatively in Washington, DC in May. We are excited to plan more with our federation members to have another provocative action like#15YearsLater.

Regional Summits

Four Regional Summits will provide growth, support, and leadership opportunities relevant to your area, and we bridge these experiences with our national work.

  • South will be in Houston, TX in April
  • West Coast will be in Fresno, CA in July
  • Midwest will be in Chicago, IL in August
  • East Coast will be in Boston, MA in October

We need your help to support each other with love and resources, to respond to hateful rhetoric, and to fight hard for our LGBTQ AAPI community.

Will you help us raise $10,000?

All donations to NQAPIA are tax-deductible!
Donate online, or mail a check to NQAPIA at 233 5th Avenue, Suite 4A, New York, NY 10016.

Thank you for your support of the LGBTQ AAPI community. We can’t do this without you.

Showing Up in Solidarity #15YearsLater: Reflections from our Accomplices & Family

This past Sunday, on the 15th anniversary of 9/11, over 60 people created mock checkpoints across Washington, D.C. and shut down the intersection of 14th St and U St NW for two hours. As queer and trans Muslims and South Asians, we demanded an end to the legalized profiling of our people, especially by Secretary Jeh Johnson and the Department of Homeland Security.

Our partners, accomplices, and political family showed up in solidarity. They recognized that our movements for freedom are deeply connected. They recognized themselves in our struggles, and showed up in deep solidarity for our collective liberation. Here, in their own words, they explain why they took part in our #15YearsLater action, and their vision for our shared liberation.

***

#15YearsLater Black Muslim Lives Matter PC: Nate Atwell

Angela Peoples, GetEQUAL – PC: Nate Atwell

Angela Peoples, GetEQUAL:

We cannot commemorate the tragic events of September 11, 2001 without also addressing the devastating violence and harm that stemmed from racist profiling and criminalization of our communities, all in the name of “safety” and “national security.” LGBTQ people of color feel the impact of this culture of fear, Islamophobia and anti immigrant sentiment every day. We will continue to stand with our Asian American and Pacific Islander family to reject this violence and demand an end to all institutions and systems that criminalize our existence.

API Resistance:

Right now Muslim majority countries in West Asia are going through the series of exploitative, Orientalist wars that plagued East and Southeast Asia in the 20th century. When one quarter of Muslims in America are black or of African-descent and when the countries with the top four largest Muslim populations are in Southeast and South Asia we need to realize that we can no longer divide our identities by race or religion. We must forget the borders that have been imposed on our lands and on our bodies. We must stand up against injustice everywhere. We will not be free until each one of us is free.

Darakshan Raja, Muslim American Women’s Policy Forum:

This was one of few multiracial, people of color led actions that centered Islamophobia. At a moment when Muslim women, femmes, trans, queer and gender non-conforming folks are being specifically targeted, it is important to build solidarity. And we need to be real that we have so much more work to do.

photo credit IG @themauricio

Lakshmi Sridaran, SAALT – PC: IG @themauricio

Lakshmi Sridaran, South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT):

It was important for SAALT to support this weekend’s action to go beyond words and help people get a snapshot of the kind of profiling and surveillance our communities have experienced in the last 15 years to illustrate the largely untold story of the victims of post 9/11 government policies. It was powerful to be on the streets to educate white people and also share common experiences with other people of color and people who identify as queer and transgender who experience this impact on a daily basis.

Maha Hilal, National Coalition to Protect Civil Freedoms:

As we work towards ending the destructive policies of the post 9/11 era, we recognize the role of simultaneously empowering our communities to take action against these policies. We hope this will bring us one step closer to getting justice for ALL those who have been impacted by the policies of the War on Terror.

***

We are part of movements larger than ourselves. We are part of fights for queer people of color liberation, Black liberation, immigrant rights, justice for Muslims, API liberation, and more. Only through movement building across our communities will we be able to achieve freedom for all our people.

The participants in #15YearsLater demonstrated that building such movements is not just necessary, but possible. We can – and we will – take the streets together, build political family, and have each others’ backs. We will achieve our liberation, together.

Thank you, again, to everyone who showed up for our collective liberation this Sunday. We will be in struggle with you, side by side, until we all get free.

The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) is a federation of LGBTQ Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) organizations. We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBTQ AAPI groups, develop leadership, invigorate grassroots organizing, and challenge queerphobia and racism.

NQAPIA Joins LGBTQ Organizations in Responsding to 2014 DOJ Guidance on Profiling

Today, December 9, NQAPIA joined LGBTQ organizations in responding to the U.S. Department of Justice Guidance on Profiling released on December 8, 2104.

A national coalition of LGBTQ organizations advocating on criminal justice issues including the National LGBTQ Task Force, the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE), National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA), National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP), the Columbia University Center for Gender and Sexuality Law, Streetwise and Safe (SAS) and the American Civil Liberties Union welcomed yesterday’s announcement of a long awaited update to the 2003 guidance banning racial profiling by federal law enforcement agencies.

The new guidance announced by Attorney General Eric Holder expands the existing ban on racial profiling by federal law enforcement agents to also bar the use of sexual orientation, gender, or gender identity, along with national origin and religion, to any degree in the initiation of law enforcement interactions.

As the nation continues to be rocked by the all too often deadly effects of profiling and discriminatory policing practices illustrated by the killings of Mike Brown, Eric Gardner, Tanesha Edwards, Aura Rosser, and so many others, LGBTQ organizations welcomed this historic move to recognize and redress police profiling of all members of communities of color, including women and LGBTQ people of color. From federal investigations in New Orleans and Puerto Rico, to research by LGBTQ organizations including Lambda Legal, the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, the National Center for Transgender Equality and the National LGBTQ Task Force, to the voices of communities with whom we work on the ground, it is clear that police profiling of LGBTQ people – particularly people of color – is an everyday occurrence. The expansion of protections against profiling by federal law enforcement agencies based on sexual orientation, gender, and gender identity is both an historic and critical step toward remedying these injustices.

However, the revised guidance includes broad exceptions that dampen the effect of these important protections. The carve-outs for Customs and Border Patrol, Transportation Security Administration, and certain anti-terror investigations are simply unacceptable. Racial profiling is not an investigative technique—it is discrimination, period.We urge the Administration to expand these protections to reach all federal and federally funded law enforcement activities, including and especially those which target Muslim communities and take place at our borders, which until all too recently were closed to LGBTQ immigrants. LGBTQ migrants continue to face significant barriers to entry and profiling and discriminatory policing by CBP and TSA agents, and Muslim LGBTQ people are among those targeted by unacceptable profiling practices pursued in the name of “national security.”

Additionally, while setting an important example for law enforcement agencies across the country, the guidance is neither mandatory nor does it apply to most state and local law enforcement activities. The Guidance also doesn’t include clear accountability measures beyond internal investigations, which do not allow for transparency or independent accountability. As a result, the guidance will not address the majority of profiling faced by LGBTQ people.

Accordingly, the undersigned organizations, consistent with the recommendations made in A Roadmap for Change: Federal Policy Recommendations to Address the Criminalization of LGBT People and People Living with HIV, urge state and local law enforcement agencies to adopt similarly expansive profiling bans without exceptions, and law enforcement agencies at all levels to mandate and effectively enforce them.

Finally, we urge Congress to take action to pass an expanded version of the End Racial Profiling Act which includes protections from profiling based on gender, gender identity, and sexual orientation in order to ensure that the federal ban against profiling becomes the law of the land, and offer effective protections to all people affected by police profiling.

Signed,

American Civil Liberties Union

Audre Lorde Project

The Center for Constitutional Rights

The Equity Project

Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement

Immigration Equality

National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE)

National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP)

National Immigrant Justice Center

National LGBTQ Task Force

National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)

Providence Youth Student Movement (PrYSM)

Southerners on New Ground (SONG)

Streetwise and Safe (SAS)

Transgender Law Center

NQAPIA Statement on Grand Jury Decision Regarding the Shooting of Michael Brown

NQAPIA stands in solidarity with the family of Michael Brown and all those who protest injustice.  As LGBT Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders, we know too well the pains of those who suffer under unbridled police misconduct and other law enforcement officials. We stand arm in arm with the community of Ferguson to demand justice for Mike Brown. Black lives matter and we do not accept the decision of the Grand Jury.

Violence perpetrated by state actors in the streets of Ferguson, at immigration detention center, or at the border must be curtailed and the safety and security of all people of color–African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans — and especially young people, immigrants, people of transgender experiences must be safeguarded. Law enforcement agencies must be held accountable to the communities they swore to serve and protect.

The Grand Jury’s refusal to indict Officer Darren Wilson for the shooting of Michael Brown is a statement by our Justice System that if you wear a badge, you do no not have to be accountable to the same laws as the people in this nation. It is a statement that black lives don’t matter and that American judicial system will continue to use two different water fountains: One for those who wear the badge and another for “colored” people.

NQAPIA calls on the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate the Ferguson Police Department for systematic civil rights violations. We also call on the U.S. Department of Justice to issue guidance on racial and religious profiling to provide safeguard our communities from state actors.

NQAPIA calls on our queer Asian community to rise up and protest injustice; to stand in solidarity with the people of Ferguson. Join protests around the nation to demand justice for Mike Brown.

#MikeBrown #BlackLivesMatter #Solidarity

QUEER ASIANS REVEL IN VICTORY; BUT WILL CONTINUE TO FIGHT

Breaking News: President Obama Announces Action on Immigration; Queer Asians respond

For Immediate Release: November 21, 2014
Media  Contacts:
Pabitra Benjamin, NQAPIA Organizing Director
202-805-5405, pabitra_benjamin@nqapia.org.
Roberta sklar 917-704-6358
(For Interview opportunities)

QUEER ASIANS REVEL IN VICTORY; BUT WILL CONTINUE TO FIGHT

 The President’s action is a great step forward but the devil, and our dignity, are often in the details.”  Pebitra Benjamin, NQAPIA   

On Thursday Nov 20, President Obama, in an historic announcement of Executive Action regarding immigration reform, talked about how immigrants came to the United States to contribute to American’s successes. “At the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance we know that LGBT immigrants, whether they are on a visa or undocumented, also contribute to the LGBT community’s successes. The LGBT community is strengthened because of LGBT immigrants,” said Aya Tasaki, an immigrant, law student, and NQAPIA Board Member.

NQAPIA applauds the President’s actions,” said Pabitra Benjamin, NQAPIA Organizing Director.  “It will grant administrative relief to millions of undocumented immigrants.  The President’s action will have tremendous impact on the lives of so many LGBT Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islanders through the expanded Deferred Action (DACA) Program; visas for workers in the Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Math; and change in those prioritized for deportation.   We know that so many LGBT AAPIs who are here on worker visas, entered as childhood arrivals, will benefit from these actions.”

The elimination of Secure Communities, where local police are given the power to enforce complicated immigration laws, will curb some of the state violence that so many immigrants experience and fear. However, the continued focus on enforcement through the Priority Enforcement Program (PEP), increase in border security and renewed focus on ‘terrorism’ will still allow law enforcement agencies to cast a broad dragnet in criminalizing and profiling our communities.

We were also dismayed that the President did not include the parents of Dreamers for relief, create a new non-familial category for LGBT immigration, access to healthcare for undocumented immigrants or address alternatives for transgender people in detention.

LGBT AAPIs across the country worked incredibly hard for the past several years to urge Congress to enact a comprehensive immigration reform bill and the President to take bold administrative action.   We collected thousands of postcards, made hundreds of phone calls, met with lawmakers, and had demonstrations across the country.  The President’s actions do not address every one of our issues but its a major step in the right direction.

These changes, within the limits of executive power are temporary and do not provide a path to citizenship.  Now is the time for the Congress to turn away from partisan politicking, and focus on humane legislation that will give us true comprehensive Immigration reform. Over the coming months, NQAPIA will work with the administration through implementation and to address these issues for the LGBT AAPI community. We’ll continue to press Congress to enact permanent, inclusive, and comprehensive immigration reform.  For NQAPIA, no one can be left behind in reform.

“The devil, and our dignity, are often in the details,”  Benjamin concluded.

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The National Queer Asian Pacific IslanderAlliance (NQAPIA) is a federation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI)organizations.  We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBT AAPIgroups, develop leadership, promote visibility, educate our community, enhance grassroots organizing, expand collaborations, and challenge homophobia and racism.

QUEER ASIANS REVEL IN VICTORY BUT WILL CONTINUE TO FIGHT

Breaking News: President Obama Announces Action on Immigration; Queer Asians respond

For Immediate Release: November 21, 2014
Media  Contacts:
Pabitra Benjamin, NQAPIA Organizing Director
202-805-5405, pabitra_benjamin@nqapia.org.
Roberta sklar 917-704-6358
(For Interview opportunities)

QUEER ASIANS REVEL IN VICTORY BUT WILL CONTINUE TO FIGHT

 The President’s action is a great step forward but the devil, and our dignity, are often in the details.” – Pabitra Benjamin, NQAPIA   

On Thursday Nov 20, President Obama, in an historic announcement of Executive Action regarding immigration reform, talked about how immigrants came to the United States to contribute to American’s successes. “At the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance we know that LGBT immigrants, whether they are on a visa or undocumented, also contribute to the LGBT community’s successes. The LGBT community is strengthened because of LGBT immigrants,” said Aya Tasaki, an immigrant, law student, and NQAPIA Board Member.

NQAPIA applauds the President’s actions,” said Pabitra Benjamin, NQAPIA Organizing Director.  “It will grant administrative relief to millions of undocumented immigrants.  The President’s action will have tremendous impact on the lives of so many LGBT Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islanders through the expanded Deferred Action (DACA) Program; visas for workers in the Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Math; and change in those prioritized for deportation.   We know that so many LGBT AAPIs who are here on worker visas, entered as childhood arrivals, will benefit from these actions.”

The elimination of Secure Communities, where local police are given the power to enforce complicated immigration laws, will curb some of the state violence that so many immigrants experience and fear. However, the continued focus on enforcement through the Priority Enforcement Program (PEP), increase in border security and renewed focus on ‘terrorism’ will still allow law enforcement agencies to cast a broad dragnet in criminalizing and profiling our communities.

We were also dismayed that the President did not include the parents of Dreamers for relief, create a new non-familial category for LGBT immigration, access to healthcare for undocumented immigrants or address alternatives for transgender people in detention.

LGBT AAPIs across the country worked incredibly hard for the past several years to urge Congress to enact a comprehensive immigration reform bill and the President to take bold administrative action.   We collected thousands of postcards, made hundreds of phone calls, met with lawmakers, and had demonstrations across the country.  The President’s actions do not address every one of our issues but its a major step in the right direction.

These changes, within the limits of executive power are temporary and do not provide a path to citizenship.  Now is the time for the Congress to turn away from partisan politicking, and focus on humane legislation that will give us true comprehensive Immigration reform. Over the coming months, NQAPIA will work with the administration through implementation and to address these issues for the LGBT AAPI community. We’ll continue to press Congress to enact permanent, inclusive, and comprehensive immigration reform.  For NQAPIA, no one can be left behind in reform.

“The devil, and our dignity, are often in the details,”  Benjamin concluded.

###

The National Queer Asian Pacific IslanderAlliance (NQAPIA) is a federation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI)organizations.  We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBT AAPIgroups, develop leadership, promote visibility, educate our community, enhance grassroots organizing, expand collaborations, and challenge homophobia and racism.

NQAPIA Supports the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

NQAPIA is proud to take part in activities around the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech.

We are joining AAPI national organizations in a contingent to take part in the National Action to Realize the Dream March & Rally on Saturday, August 24.  People interested in joining us in Washington, DC can meet up at 8:00am at the southeast side of the World War II  Memorial.

RSVP for updates and logistics:  http://bit.ly/NCAPAmarchRSVP

 

We have also joined a list of over forty LGBT organizations supporting the March that signed the following open letter .

An Open Letter in Support of 50th Anniversary of March on Washington

Over the past year, our community has celebrated tremendous wins in the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality and justice.

We have collectively cheered the first ever Senate committee markup of an inclusive Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA), the Social Security Administration’s modernization of its gender marker policy, and U.S. Supreme Court wins on marriage equality in the Windsor and Perry rulings. But we remain frustrated that ENDA is still not the law of the land and we’re angered and deeply disappointed with the Court’s decision to turn back critical parts of the historic Voting Rights Act in Shelby.

We must channel this frustration and disappointment into action to tackle employment discrimination, voter suppression tactics, immigration reform and racial profiling, to name only a few.

This month we have an opportunity to bring the combined energy from our victories to a major gathering that will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom. History was made that day 50 years ago when thousands came to Washington, D.C. to lift up their voices in support of civil rights, employment protection and an end to racial segregation in our nation’s schools. On August 24, 2013, we will rededicate ourselves to that dream of equality and justice.

It has been over 40 years since Stonewall and the birth of the modern LGBTQ rights movement. As national, state and local LGBTQ organizations, we know that while there have been many advancements over the last four decades since Stonewall and the five decades since the 1963 March, there is still much more work to be done. We are proud to commemorate the 1963 March and, once again, come together and collectively take action to “Realize the Dream.”

At a time when the nation still does not have clear federal laws barring discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity, we still need to step up and be visible. We believe that everyone deserves the opportunity to find and keep a job in a safe work environment with a living wage regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity and expression. We also believe that all members of our community, whether they are seniors, middle-aged or youth, deserve to be safe from violence, harassment, exploitation and racial profiling when they are at home, school, work, or in any other public places. As LGBTQ people, we believe that quality health care should be accessible, affordable and culturally competent. We believe that the 11 million undocumented immigrants, including at least 267,000 undocumented LGBT people living in this country, should have a real pathway to citizenship and people from all backgrounds should be able to stay with their families. We believe these are issues that cut across all lines of gender, race and ethnicity, gender identity and sexual orientation, ability and immigration status. It’s time to join forces and demonstrate our collective power.

Take Action

Working together, this rally and mobilization is an opportunity to lift up the voices of LGBT people as part of a broad progressive agenda for social and economic justice. Please join us on Saturday, August 24, 2013, at 8 AM – 3 PM in Washington, D.C. at the DC War Memorial at 900 Independence Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20245.  (The Memorial is located across Independence Ave. from the Martin Luther King Memorial), as we come together in support of freedom and justice!

In Solidarity,

Get Equal
Human Rights Campaign
National Black Justice Coalition
National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
Pride at Work, AFL-CIO

 

Endorsers:

Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice
Believe Out Loud
Bethel Christian Church, DC
BiNet USA
Bisexual Resource Center
Center for Black Equity
CenterLink: The Community of LGBT Centers
The Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals
Equality Federation
Family Equality Council
The Fellowship of Affirming Ministries
FORGE, Inc.
Freedom to Marry
Freedom to Work
Gay-Straight Alliance Network (GSA Network)
GLAAD
GLAD (Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders)
GLMA: Health Professionals Advancing LGBT Equality
GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network)
Harvey Milk Foundation
Immigration Equality
Lambda Legal
Leadership Team of NASPA GLBT Knowledge Community
Marriage Equality USA
National Center for Lesbian Rights
National Center for Transgender Equality
National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce
NQAPIA
Out & Equal Workplace Advocates
PFLAG National
Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE)
The Trevor Project
Trans Advocacy Network
Trans People of Color Coalition
Transgender Law Center
Unid@s, The National Latin@ LGBT Human rights Organization

Intern Corner: Justice for Trayvon Martin & The OCA National Convention

Justice for  Trayvon Martin by Steven

When the Trayvon Martin murder happened, it struck me as yet another crime against people of color that some refuse to acknowledge as racism. However, it was the verdict that exempted George Zimmerman from murder that felt like a slap in the face.  When these hate crimes happen, it reminds me of the bias that individuals still hold, though I would always respond with the hope that justice will somehow address oppression. But when our “justice” system fails to declare these actions as crimes, I am reminded that our institutions actually protect racism.

Read more