Posts

Celebrating our Community

Dear friends,

This is a difficult time for many of us. It’s hard to find support with the deluge of despicable declarations that have been coming from the White House. But, we have to support each other. And, there are several champions in our community who have supported the queer API community and efforts to keep or community safe and fight for immigrants’ rights, racial justice, and LGBT equality.

NQAPIA is working hard to keep our community safe and secure. You can help by making a donation.

Glenn speaks at a podium

Later this month, NQAPIA will be hosting our annual Community Catalyst Awards Celebrations in New York City and Washington, DC. They are celebrations of our community, reunions with old friends, and time to inspire a new generation of leaders. Join us!

For me, they are more than just fundraising banquets. They showcase the people who inspire me and have worked hard to defend our community. Let me tell you about them and why they are so special to me.

Community Catalyst Awards Banquet in Washington, DC on March 11


Gautam RaghavanGautam Raghavan is a first-generation immigrant from India and served as President Barack Obama’s liaison to the LGBT community and the Asian American & Pacific Islander community. Before, he was Deputy White House Liaison for the U.S. Department of Defense and led efforts to undo the Pentagon’s anti-LGBT “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy. He is now Vice President of Policy of the Gill Foundation where he drives federal and state efforts to ensure a level playing field for all LGBT Americans.


Miriam YeungMiriam Yeung was most recently the Executive Director of the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF) leading the country’s advocacy on behalf of AAPI women and girls. Miriam has brought fierce intersectional analysis, practical policy advocacy, and a deep belief in powerbuilding from the base up. I recognize her as a leader in reproductive justice, immigrant rights, economic justice, and racial justice movements.


AQUA DCFor 20 years, Asian and Pacific Islander Queers United for Action (AQUA DC) has been promoting positive identity and advocating for the general welfare of the API GBTQ male-identified members of the of the Washington, DC metro area. I’ve know the “AQUA boys” for over 15 years and have always admired their advocacy, coalition building, education, networking, outreach, and support.


Where would our community be were it not for Gautam, Miriam, and AQUA?

Community Catalyst Awards Banquet in New York City on March 25


OnginaOngina (born Ryan Ong Palao) is flying in from Los Angeles and is originally from the Philippines. She was part of the 1st Cast of RuPaul’s Drag Race and was best known for her sweetness, fashionable runway presentations, and coming out to the world as HIV+. She now hosts Logo’s series “HIV and Me” to tell the stories of those living with HIV. Ongina inspires me with her views drag as artistic expression and an outlet for a woman stuck in a gay man’s body to come out and let loose and have fun. I can so relate.


Ng FamilyThe Ng Family is one where each member of the family has done so much for the LGBT API community (pictured left to right: Jonas, Virginia, Maxwell, and John).

Father John Ng, was educated in Hong Kong and came to the U.S. in 1974 looking to better his life and provide an opportunity for the next generation. He has spoken on several panels being the proud father of a transgender son. He has been married to his wife Virginia for 43 years.

Mother Virginia Lou Ng, has been involved in the Asian American community for over 35 years and is best known for her work at OCA – Asian Pacific American Advocates (formerly the Organization of Chinese Americans) and Charles B. Wang Community Health Center. Virginia served as New Jersey Chapter President and OCA National Vice President.

Son Maxwell Ng chairs the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition. Last summer, MTPC passed legislation to protect Trans people in public accommodations. Maxwell also serves on the Steering Committee for the Queer Asian Pacific-Islander Alliance (QAPA). Founded in 1979, QAPA, is the oldest Asian queer organization in the US.

Brother Jonas Ng is a Vice President at Nationwide Bank. He has excelled as a member of the Bank’s executive leadership team and before was a Managing Director for Discover Card. He is a staunch LGBT ally and has promoted Diversity and Inclusion is at several Fortune 200 financial institutions.


I love that we are honoring a drag queen and a family.

Fundraising

It’s up to the community to support the work of NQAPIA in cultivating a new generation of LGBT API leaders, building local capacity, fighting for immigrants’ rights, and promoting family acceptance. We cannot rely on foundations, corporations, and the rich. So, at each of the dinners, Anish Tailor from KhushDC and Patrick Lee from GAPIMNY will share their personal stories and why they are supporting NQAPIA and the Queer Asian movement. All support at any level helps.

I am so excited for each of these dinners and I hope you can join us. You can buy tickets to the New York and Washington, DC dinners.

If you cannot come, please consider supporting someone else to come so that they can be in community with us. NQAPIA believes that money should never be a barrier to participating. You can donate a ticket by purchasing a ticket for either or both dinners in New York and Washington, DC.

And at the very least, a donation of any amount will help continue the critical work of these amazing honorees. Donate at bit.ly/supportcca.

I hope you can join us and be in community with us either in-person or as a donor. We need your support now more than ever.

In community and solidarity:

../../Bios/Glenn%20Signature.jpg

Glenn D. Magpantay
Executive Director
National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)
glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org

#NQAPIA   bit.ly/supportcca   #Catalyst2017

Remembering Orlando for National Coming Out Day

Earlier this week was National Coming Out Day, and during the delay of this email, we took time to reflect on the months since the Orlando tragedy. To us, the Orlando tragedy underlines how important it is to be out of the closet and to support and celebrate individualism and diversity, especially for our kids and youth.

Whether during LGBT Pride Month, LGBT History/Herstory/Theirstory Month, or any month, let’s show unity and have the biggest LGBTQ parades and parties ever! We dedicate our celebrations to those we lost in Orlando and before, and we must show support for the Muslim communities that face backlash and prejudice—just as we have as a community.

Fawzia Mirza

“There are no words to describe the sadness I felt when I heard about the tragedy and loss of our LGBTQ, Latinx and human family in Orlando. But I know that since then, as a queer, Pakistani, Muslim woman, I will hug tighter, love louder and voice even louder.”
— Comedian Fawzia Mirza Hari Kondabalu

“Whatever they say about you, know that I love you.”
— Comedian/Writer Hari Kondabolu

Anita Lo

“In the face of the Orlando tragedy, we must continue to come together to show unity and to express solidarity with the Muslim communities that are facing elevated prejudice, just as we have as a group. Love indeed conquers hate, and our rainbow flag will always represent diversity.”
— Celebrity Chef Anita Lo

Resources

Not everyone feels safe in coming out, and we still hurt from the Orlando tragedy.

If you need resources in coming out to your API Parents, watch commercials of API parents who love their LGBTQ children created by the Asian Pride Project and read translated leaflets that answer basic questions about being LGBTQ and dispel common misperceptions.

View the resources we shared after the Orlando tragedy, including counseling and support options and statements by 28 organizations.

#WeAreOrlando

Regardless of where you are at in your coming out journey, we send you love and support for National Coming Out Day.

Family is Still Family – Multilingual PSA campaign

Opening the Closet Door for our LGBTQ Kids

#FamilyIsStillFamily

A collage of 15 photos show API parents who love their LGBTQ children.

In the Asian, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (API) community, coming out to family can be difficult. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) children feel being open about sexual orientation will shame or dishonor their family, but staying in the closet takes a greater toll, causing isolation, depression, and even suicide.

NQAPIA has launched an international, multifaceted campaign to promote the acceptance of LGBTQ people in API families and to diversify the faces and languages of those who support the LGBTQ community. Our “Family is Still Family” campaign offers a powerful message: offer your LGBTQ child a lifeline, support their coming out, and keep the family strong and unified.

This campaign includes three parts:

We hope you share and enjoy our media, workshops, and challenging but important conversations!

Watch the Multilingual Videos

Family is Still Family - FilipinoNQAPIA worked with the Asian Pride Project to develop a series of short, multilingual videos of API parents who love their LGBTQ children. These groundbreaking PSAs feature parents, some of whom are foreign-born immigrants with limited English proficiency, who declare acceptance and unconditional love for their LGBTQ children.

Download the Translated Leaflets “Coming Out to API Families: Talking Points for API LGBTQ Youth”

English Leaflet: Family is Still FamilyNQAPIA and several parents developed a series of one-page, translated “fact sheets” for parents who have LGBTQ kids. The multilingual fact sheets answer basic questions about being LGBTQ and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBTQ document.

Attend a Workshop

API Parents Marsha, Clara, and LaurinJoin us for a workshop to hear Asian American parents share their experiences of confusion, fear, love, acceptance, and celebration of their LGBTQ children. We especially welcome parents of LGBTQ kids who would like to talk with other parents who understand the unique cultural issues in our communities, LGBTQ people who want to come out to their parents, or people who are struggling with family acceptance and want to understand different ways to bring them together. If you are already out to your parents, caregivers, or other family, we encourage you to bring them along!

Explore the calendar of events.

Sponsors and Supporters

The Family Acceptance Campaign is made possible by NQAPIA, Asian Pride Project, API PFLAG San Gabriel Valley, and PFLAG–NYC API Project, in partnership with Public Impact, Comcast/NBC Universal, and the CJ Huang Foundation.

NQAPIA thanks the generous support of the Arcus Foundation, David Bohnett Foundation, API Dream Team Giving Circle, PFLAG, GSA Network, Advocates for Youth, Project by Project, and countless individuals.

Join us in supporting this work by making a donation.

Japanese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

Parents_Japanese_web

Japanese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

This month of June, tune into your local Asian Television station, and see Japanese parents who love their transgender children.

English with Japanese subtitles – Marsha and Tad Aizumi, Japanese parents of a transgender son

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Japanese leaflet (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

PSAs on Asian Ethnic TV

NQAPIA worked with the Asian Pride Project to develop a series of short, multilingual videos of AAPI parents who love their LGBT children. The videos will air as Public Service Announcements (PSAs) on Asian ethnic TV stations. Throughout the month of June for LGBT Pride Month, these PSAs will potentially be seen by 13.9 million viewers.

Scroll to find your local listings on LA18, KTSF, AAT Television, and Crossings TV.

KSCI-TV “LA18” – 5.6 million viewers

Los Angeles

Mandarin, Korean, Tagalog

Over-the-air: 18.1 and 18.8
Cable: 18.8
Charter: 355/567
Cox: 485
Time Warner: 1299/638
Verizon FiOs: 488

KTSF – 1.4 million

San Francisco Bay

All 9 languages

Over-the-air: 26.1
AT&T U-verse: cable channel 8
Comcast: cable channel 8
DirecTV: cable channel 8
Dish Network: cable channel 8

AAT Television  – 1.5 million viewers

Seattle

Chinese, Vietnamese

Over-the-air: 44.3
Comcast: 350

Crossings TV – 5.4 million viewers

Chicago

Chinese, Filipino, Lao

Comcast Xfinity: 691

New York

Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian

Time Warner Cable: 1519

Sacramento-Fresno

Chinese, Filipino, South Asian, Vietnamese

Comcast Xfinity: 238

San Francisco Bay Area

Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian, Vietnamese

Comcast Xfinity: 238

Seattle

Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian, Vietnamese

Comcast Xfinity: 152

To Be Announced

Hawaii
Boston
Houston
DMV: Washington, DC; Maryland; Virginia

Chinese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Parents_Chinese_web

Chinese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have Asian American parents who love their LGBT kids say that… on television… in Chinese? In June, tune in to your local Asian Television station, and see for yourselves!

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Asian ethnic television stations will air these videos during the month of June.

Mandarin with English subtitles – Deanna Cheng, a Chinese mother of a gay son
Cantonese with English subtitles – Rosetta Lai, a Chinese mother of a lesbian daughter

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of transgender and genderqueer kids as well. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Chinese
Simplified script leaflet (click to view and download)
Traditional script leaflet (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

South Asian Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Parents_Hindi_web

South Asian Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have Asian American parents who love their LGBT kids say that… on television… in Hindi? In June, tune in to your local Asian Television station, and see for yourselves!

Translated materials are also available in BengaliGujaratiPunjabiUrduArabic, and Hindi.

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

South Asian ethnic television stations will air these videos during the month of June.

English with Hindi subtitles – Vinay Chaudhry, an Indian father of a genderqueer child
Hindi with English subtitles – Kamlesh and Harcharan Bagga, Indian parents of a gay son

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, transgender, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian Languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Hindi (click to view and download)
Gujarati (click to view and download)
Punjabi (click to view and download)
Bengali (click to view and download)
Urdu (click to view and download)
Arabic (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

Korean Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

Parents_Korean_web

Korean Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

This month of June, tune into your local Asian Television station and see Korean parents who love their transgender children.

Korean with English subtitles – Clara Yoon, a Korean mother of a transgender son

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Korean leaflet (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

PSAs on Asian Ethnic TV

NQAPIA worked with the Asian Pride Project to develop a series of short, multilingual videos of AAPI parents who love their LGBT children. The videos will air as Public Service Announcements (PSAs) on Asian ethnic TV stations. Throughout the month of June for LGBT Pride Month, these PSAs will potentially be seen by 13.9 million viewers.

Scroll to find your local listings on LA18, KTSF, AAT Television, and Crossings TV.

KSCI-TV “LA18” – 5.6 million viewers

Los Angeles

Mandarin, Korean, Tagalog

Over-the-air: 18.1 and 18.8
Cable: 18.8
Charter: 355/567
Cox: 485
Time Warner: 1299/638
Verizon FiOs: 488

KTSF – 1.4 million

San Francisco Bay

All 9 languages

Over-the-air: 26.1
AT&T U-verse: cable channel 8
Comcast: cable channel 8
DirecTV: cable channel 8
Dish Network: cable channel 8

AAT Television  – 1.5 million viewers

Seattle

Chinese, Vietnamese

Over-the-air: 44.3
Comcast: 350

Crossings TV – 5.4 million viewers

Chicago

Chinese, Filipino, Lao

Comcast Xfinity: 691

New York

Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian

Time Warner Cable: 1519

Sacramento-Fresno

Chinese, Filipino, South Asian, Vietnamese

Comcast Xfinity: 238

San Francisco Bay Area

Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian, Vietnamese

Comcast Xfinity: 238

Seattle

Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian, Vietnamese

Comcast Xfinity: 152

To Be Announced

Hawaii
Boston
Houston
DMV: Washington, DC; Maryland; Virginia