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Family is Still Family: Public Service Announcements

Chinese PSAsIn the Asian and Pacific Islander (API) community, young people often see coming out as an act of shaming and dishonoring their parents and their ancestors, but staying in the closet takes a greater toll, causing isolation, depression, and even suicide.

Our “Family Is Still Family” television PSA Campaign—the first-ever multi-lingual public service announcements created especially for API parents—offers a powerful message: offer your LGBTQ child a lifeline, support their coming out, and keep the family strong and unified.

These groundbreaking ads feature parents, some of whom are foreign-born immigrants with limited English proficiency, who declare acceptance and unconditional love for their LGBTQ children.

Last year, the “Family Is Still Family” PSAs, produced in association with the Asian Pride Project, aired on local Asian ethnic television stations during LGBTQ Pride Month in markets across the U.S., including Boston, Chicago, Hawaii, Los Angeles, and Sacramento.

South Asian PSAs

Multilingual Videos

NQAPIA worked with the Asian Pride Project to develop a series of short, multilingual videos of AAPI parents who love their LGBTQ children. You can find all of the videos on YouTube.com/nqapia.

Chinese
Mandarin with English subtitles – Deanna Cheng, a Chinese mother of a gay son
Cantonese with English subtitles – Rosetta Lai, a Chinese mother of a lesbian daughter

South Asian
Hindi with English subtitles – Kamlesh and Harcharan Bagga, Indian parents of a gay son
English with Hindi subtitles – Vinay Chaudhry, an Indian father of a genderqueer child

Korean
Korean with English subtitles – Clara Yoon, a Korean mother of a transgender son

Japanese
English with Japanese subtitles – Marsha and Tad Aizumi, Japanese parents of a transgender son

Southeast Asian
Vietnamese with English subtitles – Ha Nguyen, a Vietnamese mother of a gay son
English with Lao subtitles – Phanida Phivilay, a Lao mother of a lesbian daughter

Filipino
English with Tagalog subtitles – Carol Mannion, a Filipina mother of a gay son

Family is Still Family - Filipino

None of the parents are actors. They are all everyday parents from different parts of the country.

Learn more about NQAPIA’s Family Acceptance Campaign

Download the leaflets

Attend the workshops

Share a Coffee with Actor Conrad Ricamora

Making our Communities Visible on National Television

On this Friday morning, instead of worrying on your way to work, hearing the news and quickly grabbing some coffee to-go, join Conrad Ricamora in slowing down, making coffee at home, and donating your $5 latte money to an organization who will protect your community.

Conrad, from ABC’s How to Get Away with Murder, donated his latte money to NQAPIA after learning more about our work and Trump’s staff picks. Will you support us, just like Conrad?

Coffee with Condor

Watch Conrad Ricamora talk about his donation to NQAPIA

Last year, Conrad received NQAPIA’s Community Catalyst Award for raising the visibility of LGBT Asians and educating millions about PrEP on national television. Balitang America talks with Conrad at the banquet:

Conrad Ricamora at the 2016 Community Catalyst Awards

Watch Conrad Ricamora receive the 2016 Community Catalyst Award

Tomorrow night, NQAPIA will honor another celebrity, Ongina from RuPaul’s Drag Race (Season 1) with the 2017 Community Catalyst Awards for raising awareness of API immigrants and people living with HIV.

NQAPIA Honors Ongina from RuPaul's Drag Race at the NYC Community Catalyst Dinner on Saturday, March 25, 2017 at Joy Luck Palace 98 Mott Street. Get your tickets at bit.ly/cca2017

If you cannot join, will you kindly make a donation, so someone else can attend and be with us in community during these difficult times?

Please push out this wonderful video, as our former honoree, as an effort to entice others to attend and support our work: youtu.be/xFaTOZYqj74. Thank you!

#WhyIGive
bit.ly/supportcca
#Catalyst2017
youtu.be/xFaTOZYqj74

Washington, DC Special Screening of “Documented” and Q&A featuring filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas- June 1, 2014

We are pleased to present a special screening of Jose Antonio Vargas’ film, “Documented” during its opening weekend in the nation’s capital.

Tickets are general admission- we STRONGLY encourage people to buy tickets online in advance here.
For the Sunday June 1 5pm showing, Jose will be on hand for a Q&A panel with leaders of local and national LGBT, Filipino American, and Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) organizations.Further information is below. Please note: you MUST buy a ticket for general admission to see the film as you would normally in order to stay afterwards for the Q&A.The venue is a small, independent theater, seats will go quickly. We encourage people to come early and stay late!
Information for “Documented” Screening and Q&A Panel
Sunday, June 1, 5pm
West End Theater
2301 M Street, NW
5:00 PM Showing
Panel afterwards featuring local and national advocates, including:
Jose Antonio Vargas, Filmmaker and founder, Define American 
Mara Keisling, Executive Director National Center for Transgender Equality
Marita Etcubanez, Former Co-chair, Kaya: Filipino Americans for Progress- DC Chapter
Ben de Guzman, Co-Director for Programs, National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance 
Co-sponsors
National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)
National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
National Center for Transgender Equality
Kaya: Filipino Americans for Progress- DC Chapter
Asian Pacific Islander Queers United for Action (AQUA-DC)
Asian Pacific Islander Queer Sisters (APIQS)
KhushDC- South Asian LGBT Organization in Washington, DC
Check our our Facebook page here.

NQAPIA Statement on Senator Daniel Inouye

NQAPIA Co-Director Ben de Guzman with Senator Inouye

We mourn the loss of Senator Daniel K. Inouye of Hawai’i, who passed away on Tuesday, December 18, 2012.  Senator Inouye was an elder statesman in the Senate, and as President Pro Tempore, was third in line for the Presidency- an unprecedented role for an Asian American in politics.  Senator Inouye was the first Congressmember to represent Hawaiʻi in the Congress when he was elected in 1959, and was second only to Senator Robert Byrd in years served in the Senate.

As a World War II veteran, Senator Inouye was outspoken about discrimination in the military.  He championed the cause of Filipino World War II veterans equity and supported the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, saying in a statement, “In every war we have had men and women of different sexual orientation who have stood in harm’s way and given their lives for their country. I fought alongside gay men during World War II, many of them were killed in combat. Are we to suggest that because of their sexual orientation they are not heroes?”  He also supported a range of issues of concern to AAPI and LGBT communities, including Hawaiian sovereignty, immigration, and marriage equality.

“Senator Inouye’s passing is a loss to the entire country,” said Ben de Guzman, NQAPIA Co-Director for Programs.  “He was an elder statesman in the Senate, a rarity for AAPIs in Capitol Hill.  At the same time, he was an advocate for the LGBT community, speaking out on issues like the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell and marriage equality.  He will be sorely missed.”