Posts

#RedefineSecurity Statistics

We’ve created our own 1-pagers and infographics on critical racial/religious profiling issues.  Take a look!

Countering Violent Extremism (1-Pager)

Homeland Security (1-Pager)

FBI Terror Watchlist (1-Pager)

Southeast Asians are 3-5 times more likely to be deported on the basis of an old criminal conviction than other immigrant communities The Sikh Coalition has seen a 3 times increase in hate crime reports since the bombings in Paris. Wages for Arab and Muslim men have gone down 10% since 9/11 In the past year, 28% of Muslim high school students in New York City report being stopped by the police. 25% of South Asians in the US report being selected for secondary screening in the majority of their encounters with the TSA. 48% of Muslims report experiencing racial/religious discrimination in the past year. (Gallup Poll) 75% of media coverage on Muslims is negative. Laotian and Cambodian youth in California are incarcerated at 5-9x the rate of the general population.

Sources:
http://www.searac.org/sites/default/files/SEAA%20School%20to%20Deportation%20Pipeline_0.pdf
http://saalt.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/In-Our-Own-Words-Narratives-of-South-Asian-New-Yorkers-Affected-by-Racial-and-Religious-Profiling.pdf
http://www.gallup.com/poll/6361/civil-rights-profile-profiling.aspx
http://repec.iza.org/dp4411.pdf

Share a Coffee with Actor Conrad Ricamora

Making our Communities Visible on National Television

On this Friday morning, instead of worrying on your way to work, hearing the news and quickly grabbing some coffee to-go, join Conrad Ricamora in slowing down, making coffee at home, and donating your $5 latte money to an organization who will protect your community.

Conrad, from ABC’s How to Get Away with Murder, donated his latte money to NQAPIA after learning more about our work and Trump’s staff picks. Will you support us, just like Conrad?

Coffee with Condor

Watch Conrad Ricamora talk about his donation to NQAPIA

Last year, Conrad received NQAPIA’s Community Catalyst Award for raising the visibility of LGBT Asians and educating millions about PrEP on national television. Balitang America talks with Conrad at the banquet:

Conrad Ricamora at the 2016 Community Catalyst Awards

Watch Conrad Ricamora receive the 2016 Community Catalyst Award

Tomorrow night, NQAPIA will honor another celebrity, Ongina from RuPaul’s Drag Race (Season 1) with the 2017 Community Catalyst Awards for raising awareness of API immigrants and people living with HIV.

NQAPIA Honors Ongina from RuPaul's Drag Race at the NYC Community Catalyst Dinner on Saturday, March 25, 2017 at Joy Luck Palace 98 Mott Street. Get your tickets at bit.ly/cca2017

If you cannot join, will you kindly make a donation, so someone else can attend and be with us in community during these difficult times?

Please push out this wonderful video, as our former honoree, as an effort to entice others to attend and support our work: youtu.be/xFaTOZYqj74. Thank you!

#WhyIGive
bit.ly/supportcca
#Catalyst2017
youtu.be/xFaTOZYqj74

Celebrating our Community

Dear friends,

This is a difficult time for many of us. It’s hard to find support with the deluge of despicable declarations that have been coming from the White House. But, we have to support each other. And, there are several champions in our community who have supported the queer API community and efforts to keep or community safe and fight for immigrants’ rights, racial justice, and LGBT equality.

NQAPIA is working hard to keep our community safe and secure. You can help by making a donation.

Glenn speaks at a podium

Later this month, NQAPIA will be hosting our annual Community Catalyst Awards Celebrations in New York City and Washington, DC. They are celebrations of our community, reunions with old friends, and time to inspire a new generation of leaders. Join us!

For me, they are more than just fundraising banquets. They showcase the people who inspire me and have worked hard to defend our community. Let me tell you about them and why they are so special to me.

Community Catalyst Awards Banquet in Washington, DC on March 11


Gautam RaghavanGautam Raghavan is a first-generation immigrant from India and served as President Barack Obama’s liaison to the LGBT community and the Asian American & Pacific Islander community. Before, he was Deputy White House Liaison for the U.S. Department of Defense and led efforts to undo the Pentagon’s anti-LGBT “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy. He is now Vice President of Policy of the Gill Foundation where he drives federal and state efforts to ensure a level playing field for all LGBT Americans.


Miriam YeungMiriam Yeung was most recently the Executive Director of the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF) leading the country’s advocacy on behalf of AAPI women and girls. Miriam has brought fierce intersectional analysis, practical policy advocacy, and a deep belief in powerbuilding from the base up. I recognize her as a leader in reproductive justice, immigrant rights, economic justice, and racial justice movements.


AQUA DCFor 20 years, Asian and Pacific Islander Queers United for Action (AQUA DC) has been promoting positive identity and advocating for the general welfare of the API GBTQ male-identified members of the of the Washington, DC metro area. I’ve know the “AQUA boys” for over 15 years and have always admired their advocacy, coalition building, education, networking, outreach, and support.


Where would our community be were it not for Gautam, Miriam, and AQUA?

Community Catalyst Awards Banquet in New York City on March 25


OnginaOngina (born Ryan Ong Palao) is flying in from Los Angeles and is originally from the Philippines. She was part of the 1st Cast of RuPaul’s Drag Race and was best known for her sweetness, fashionable runway presentations, and coming out to the world as HIV+. She now hosts Logo’s series “HIV and Me” to tell the stories of those living with HIV. Ongina inspires me with her views drag as artistic expression and an outlet for a woman stuck in a gay man’s body to come out and let loose and have fun. I can so relate.


Ng FamilyThe Ng Family is one where each member of the family has done so much for the LGBT API community (pictured left to right: Jonas, Virginia, Maxwell, and John).

Father John Ng, was educated in Hong Kong and came to the U.S. in 1974 looking to better his life and provide an opportunity for the next generation. He has spoken on several panels being the proud father of a transgender son. He has been married to his wife Virginia for 43 years.

Mother Virginia Lou Ng, has been involved in the Asian American community for over 35 years and is best known for her work at OCA – Asian Pacific American Advocates (formerly the Organization of Chinese Americans) and Charles B. Wang Community Health Center. Virginia served as New Jersey Chapter President and OCA National Vice President.

Son Maxwell Ng chairs the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition. Last summer, MTPC passed legislation to protect Trans people in public accommodations. Maxwell also serves on the Steering Committee for the Queer Asian Pacific-Islander Alliance (QAPA). Founded in 1979, QAPA, is the oldest Asian queer organization in the US.

Brother Jonas Ng is a Vice President at Nationwide Bank. He has excelled as a member of the Bank’s executive leadership team and before was a Managing Director for Discover Card. He is a staunch LGBT ally and has promoted Diversity and Inclusion is at several Fortune 200 financial institutions.


I love that we are honoring a drag queen and a family.

Fundraising

It’s up to the community to support the work of NQAPIA in cultivating a new generation of LGBT API leaders, building local capacity, fighting for immigrants’ rights, and promoting family acceptance. We cannot rely on foundations, corporations, and the rich. So, at each of the dinners, Anish Tailor from KhushDC and Patrick Lee from GAPIMNY will share their personal stories and why they are supporting NQAPIA and the Queer Asian movement. All support at any level helps.

I am so excited for each of these dinners and I hope you can join us. You can buy tickets to the New York and Washington, DC dinners.

If you cannot come, please consider supporting someone else to come so that they can be in community with us. NQAPIA believes that money should never be a barrier to participating. You can donate a ticket by purchasing a ticket for either or both dinners in New York and Washington, DC.

And at the very least, a donation of any amount will help continue the critical work of these amazing honorees. Donate at bit.ly/supportcca.

I hope you can join us and be in community with us either in-person or as a donor. We need your support now more than ever.

In community and solidarity:

../../Bios/Glenn%20Signature.jpg

Glenn D. Magpantay
Executive Director
National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)
glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org

#NQAPIA   bit.ly/supportcca   #Catalyst2017

Creating Change 2017

The National LGBTQ Task Force sponsors and organizes the Creating Change. The 29th Creating Change will be held at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown in Philadelphia from January 18-22, 2017.

Many of these events are open to all, and we encourage active participation. If you do not identify with the event, please respect requests for safe spaces.

Thursday, 1/19

9:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Queer API Institute: Building a Queer Asian American & Pacific Islander Movement

Friday, 1/20

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM • Workshop Session 1
Jeh Johnson, Can You Hear Us Now? Organizing Against Islamophobia & Legalized Profiling

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM • Workshop Session 2
Faith and Family Acceptance in the API Community

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM • Caucus 1
Asian/South Asian/Southeast Asian/Pacific Islander Caucus

Saturday, 1/21

9:00 AM – 10:30 AM • Workshop Session 5
Building Queer Asian/South Asian Community and Movement

4:45 PM – 6:15 PM • Workshop Session 8
Loving with Our Whole Hearts: A Mother and Transgender Son

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM • Caucus 2
QPOC Caucus

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM • Caucus 2
South Asian LGBTQ Caucus

Sunday, 1/22

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Bunch and Closing Plenary

Glenn D. Magpantay Receives the Haas, Jr. Award for Outstanding LGBTQ Leadership for Immigrant Rights

In Case of Emergency
Glenn 917-439-3158
Sasha 909-343-2219
Tia 224-280-2236

Remembering Orlando for National Coming Out Day

Earlier this week was National Coming Out Day, and during the delay of this email, we took time to reflect on the months since the Orlando tragedy. To us, the Orlando tragedy underlines how important it is to be out of the closet and to support and celebrate individualism and diversity, especially for our kids and youth.

Whether during LGBT Pride Month, LGBT History/Herstory/Theirstory Month, or any month, let’s show unity and have the biggest LGBTQ parades and parties ever! We dedicate our celebrations to those we lost in Orlando and before, and we must show support for the Muslim communities that face backlash and prejudice—just as we have as a community.

Fawzia Mirza

“There are no words to describe the sadness I felt when I heard about the tragedy and loss of our LGBTQ, Latinx and human family in Orlando. But I know that since then, as a queer, Pakistani, Muslim woman, I will hug tighter, love louder and voice even louder.”
— Comedian Fawzia Mirza Hari Kondabalu

“Whatever they say about you, know that I love you.”
— Comedian/Writer Hari Kondabolu

Anita Lo

“In the face of the Orlando tragedy, we must continue to come together to show unity and to express solidarity with the Muslim communities that are facing elevated prejudice, just as we have as a group. Love indeed conquers hate, and our rainbow flag will always represent diversity.”
— Celebrity Chef Anita Lo

Resources

Not everyone feels safe in coming out, and we still hurt from the Orlando tragedy.

If you need resources in coming out to your API Parents, watch commercials of API parents who love their LGBTQ children created by the Asian Pride Project and read translated leaflets that answer basic questions about being LGBTQ and dispel common misperceptions.

View the resources we shared after the Orlando tragedy, including counseling and support options and statements by 28 organizations.

#WeAreOrlando

Regardless of where you are at in your coming out journey, we send you love and support for National Coming Out Day.

Volunteers Needed to Defend Asian American Voting Rights

DC • CA • FL • GA • LA • MA • MD • MI • NJ • NM • NV • NY • PA • TX • VA

AALDEF 2016 Election Infographic

2016 Asian American Exit Poll and Poll Monitoring

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

In past elections, Asian Americans have faced a series of barriers in exercising their right to vote, including segregated “Asian” voting lines. When the news media reported on election results, Asian Americans were overlooked. In response, the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF) has conducted a non-partisan survey of Asian American voters to document Asian American voting patterns and document instances of anti-Asian voter disenfranchisement. AALDEF has also monitored the elections for compliance with the federal Voting Rights Act, which mandates bilingual ballots and forbids anti-Asian voter discrimination.

We need your help. In the 2012 elections, 850 volunteers polled 9,096 Asian American voters in 14 states and Washington, DC. All are welcome to volunteer for our exit poll, which we will conduct in CA, FL, GA, LA, MA, MD, MI, NJ, NM, NV, NY, PA, TX, VA, and Washington, DC. Exit poll volunteers work in 3-hour shifts. We are also looking for law students and attorneys to monitor polls in NY, NJ, MA, and possibly in MI and PA. We will conduct mandatory 60-minute community trainings (90 minutes for CLE trainings) in all of these regions. All volunteers must be non-partisan during the time that they help. Complete the form at www.aaldef.net. Thank you!

For more information, contact AALDEF Democracy Program Director Jerry Vattamala or Voting Rights Organizer Iris Zalun at 800-966-5946 or votingrights@aaldef.org.

Showing Up in Solidarity #15YearsLater: Reflections from our Accomplices & Family

This past Sunday, on the 15th anniversary of 9/11, over 60 people created mock checkpoints across Washington, D.C. and shut down the intersection of 14th St and U St NW for two hours. As queer and trans Muslims and South Asians, we demanded an end to the legalized profiling of our people, especially by Secretary Jeh Johnson and the Department of Homeland Security.

Our partners, accomplices, and political family showed up in solidarity. They recognized that our movements for freedom are deeply connected. They recognized themselves in our struggles, and showed up in deep solidarity for our collective liberation. Here, in their own words, they explain why they took part in our #15YearsLater action, and their vision for our shared liberation.

***

#15YearsLater Black Muslim Lives Matter PC: Nate Atwell

Angela Peoples, GetEQUAL – PC: Nate Atwell

Angela Peoples, GetEQUAL:

We cannot commemorate the tragic events of September 11, 2001 without also addressing the devastating violence and harm that stemmed from racist profiling and criminalization of our communities, all in the name of “safety” and “national security.” LGBTQ people of color feel the impact of this culture of fear, Islamophobia and anti immigrant sentiment every day. We will continue to stand with our Asian American and Pacific Islander family to reject this violence and demand an end to all institutions and systems that criminalize our existence.

API Resistance:

Right now Muslim majority countries in West Asia are going through the series of exploitative, Orientalist wars that plagued East and Southeast Asia in the 20th century. When one quarter of Muslims in America are black or of African-descent and when the countries with the top four largest Muslim populations are in Southeast and South Asia we need to realize that we can no longer divide our identities by race or religion. We must forget the borders that have been imposed on our lands and on our bodies. We must stand up against injustice everywhere. We will not be free until each one of us is free.

Darakshan Raja, Muslim American Women’s Policy Forum:

This was one of few multiracial, people of color led actions that centered Islamophobia. At a moment when Muslim women, femmes, trans, queer and gender non-conforming folks are being specifically targeted, it is important to build solidarity. And we need to be real that we have so much more work to do.

photo credit IG @themauricio

Lakshmi Sridaran, SAALT – PC: IG @themauricio

Lakshmi Sridaran, South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT):

It was important for SAALT to support this weekend’s action to go beyond words and help people get a snapshot of the kind of profiling and surveillance our communities have experienced in the last 15 years to illustrate the largely untold story of the victims of post 9/11 government policies. It was powerful to be on the streets to educate white people and also share common experiences with other people of color and people who identify as queer and transgender who experience this impact on a daily basis.

Maha Hilal, National Coalition to Protect Civil Freedoms:

As we work towards ending the destructive policies of the post 9/11 era, we recognize the role of simultaneously empowering our communities to take action against these policies. We hope this will bring us one step closer to getting justice for ALL those who have been impacted by the policies of the War on Terror.

***

We are part of movements larger than ourselves. We are part of fights for queer people of color liberation, Black liberation, immigrant rights, justice for Muslims, API liberation, and more. Only through movement building across our communities will we be able to achieve freedom for all our people.

The participants in #15YearsLater demonstrated that building such movements is not just necessary, but possible. We can – and we will – take the streets together, build political family, and have each others’ backs. We will achieve our liberation, together.

Thank you, again, to everyone who showed up for our collective liberation this Sunday. We will be in struggle with you, side by side, until we all get free.

The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) is a federation of LGBTQ Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) organizations. We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBTQ AAPI groups, develop leadership, invigorate grassroots organizing, and challenge queerphobia and racism.