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LGBTQ Indians Pressure Apple, Google, and Facebook to #ChallengeModi this Weekend on Homophobic Law

[NQAPIA is hosting this statement in support of Queers for Justice in India. For any press inquiries, please contact Tara Gonsalves (press@challengemodi.com).]
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LGBTQ Indians Pressure Apple, Google, and Facebook to #ChallengeModi this Weekend on Homophobic Law

LGBTQ Indian Americans and their allies are calling on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Apple CEO Tim Cook, and Google CEO Sundar Pichai to challenge Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to overturn India’s homophobic Victorian-era law when Modi visits Silicon Valley this weekend. A petition asking these CEOs, previously vocal supporters of LGBTQ rights in the United States, to #ChallengeModi on his institutionalized homophobia has gathered nearly one thousand signatures. On the afternoon of Sunday September 27, over one thousand people are expected to protest Modi’s human rights record in San Jose, California.

Facebook, Apple, and Google claim to be LGBTQ-friendly. Cook, a global LGBTQ role model, said he would challenge anti-LGBTQ legislation “wherever it emerges.” Zuckerberg describes Facebook as “a proud supporter of Pride,” and sports a rainbow-colored profile photo. All three companies have challenged DOMA, supported marriage equality, and provided benefits for LGBTQ employees before they were legally mandated to do so.

However, these same CEOs are now turning their backs on LGBTQ Indians, as well as their own LGBTQ employees and allies, by welcoming the controversial Indian politician, previously banned from the United States for complicity with genocide, and now refusing to take a position on Section 377, the homophobic 1860 law imposed on India by British colonizers.

Repressive laws take a toll on individuals. Sundar, a gay Indian man working in Silicon Valley, says that “due to progressive workplace policies in the valley I can be my authentic self at work. Back home in India, in contrast, the specter of 377 looms over me, my friends, and my family. We constantly fear the threat of harassment, blackmail and extortion. I hope that Silicon Valley stands up for the rights of their Indian LGBTQ employees and that PM Modi takes a stand to end the Victorian-era British law that criminalizes tens of millions of LGBTQ Indians.”

“India’s Penal Code 377 provides an avenue for harassment, extortion, and abuse of LGBTQ Indians,” says Monica Davis, Queer South Asian activist and former Trikone Chairwoman, the San Francisco Bay Area’s South Asian LGBTQ advocacy group. “If Google, Facebook, and Apple were supportive of LGBTQ rights during San Francisco Pride, they should also demonstrate support now.” Adds Suhas, Outreach Director at Trikone, “I would like to appeal to Prime Minister Modi to follow Nepal’s footsteps in including LGBTQ rights in the constitution.”

When human rights violators come to visit, we call on the CEOs of Apple, Google, and Facebook, who wield enormous influence in the global political economy, to take a stand for global LGBTQ rights. To sign the petition, visit www.ChallengeModi.com.

#No377 #ChallengeModi

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IDAHOT Lifts Up International LGBT Issues- NQAPIA Statement

  May 17 is recognized around the world as International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHOT). Today, as advocates and our allies in countries across the globe continue their important work day-to-day addressing life-threatening issues of violence and discrimination against LGBT people, NQAPIA takes this opportunity to join the global chorus of voices calling for […]

Indian Supreme Court: Desi LGBT Organizing in the Diaspora

This week, the Indian Supreme Court issued a ruling that allowed for the creation of a “third gender” to broaden the country’s gender classification systems. Many of NQAPIA’s partner groups, especially those focusing on serving South Asian LGBT communities, have been following events unfolding in India with respect to the LGBT communities there. As Indians and South Asians in diaspora, activists here in the U.S. and across the world remain connected in ways large and small.

KhushDC, Washington, DC’s local South Asian LGBT organization issued a statement in response to the Indian Supreme Court decision. “We hope the Indian government will make it a priority to enact accessible laws that will actually empower and protect India’s transgender communities not just on paper, but in all spheres of life,” said Sapna Pandya, KhushDC President. 

The statement also made the connection to the Indian Supreme Court’s previous decision last fall to revisit “Section 377” that in effect, re-criminalized homosexual behavior. South Asian LGBT organizations around the country and indeed, around the world, reacted immediately and urgently to this decision, calling for an end to homophobia and transphobia. Many organizations and activists came together to set up “377 No Going Back,” through IDEX (International Development Exchange) that connects U.S. based philanthropy to local, grassroots organizations in India directly working for LGBT communities in response to the Section 377 decision.

NQAPIA is pleased to support  KhushDC, including through fiscal sponsorship of their 20th anniversary this year and stands in solidarity with the organizers of the 377 No Going Back campaign.