Family is Still Family: Public Service Announcements

Chinese PSAsIn the Asian and Pacific Islander (API) community, young people often see coming out as an act of shaming and dishonoring their parents and their ancestors, but staying in the closet takes a greater toll, causing isolation, depression, and even suicide.

Our “Family Is Still Family” television PSA Campaign—the first-ever multi-lingual public service announcements created especially for API parents—offers a powerful message: offer your LGBTQ child a lifeline, support their coming out, and keep the family strong and unified.

These groundbreaking ads feature parents, some of whom are foreign-born immigrants with limited English proficiency, who declare acceptance and unconditional love for their LGBTQ children.

Last year, the “Family Is Still Family” PSAs, produced in association with the Asian Pride Project, aired on local Asian ethnic television stations during LGBTQ Pride Month in markets across the U.S., including Boston, Chicago, Hawaii, Los Angeles, and Sacramento.

South Asian PSAs

Multilingual Videos

NQAPIA worked with the Asian Pride Project to develop a series of short, multilingual videos of AAPI parents who love their LGBTQ children. You can find all of the videos on YouTube.com/nqapia.

Chinese
Mandarin with English subtitles – Deanna Cheng, a Chinese mother of a gay son
Cantonese with English subtitles – Rosetta Lai, a Chinese mother of a lesbian daughter

South Asian
Hindi with English subtitles – Kamlesh and Harcharan Bagga, Indian parents of a gay son
English with Hindi subtitles – Vinay Chaudhry, an Indian father of a genderqueer child

Korean
Korean with English subtitles – Clara Yoon, a Korean mother of a transgender son

Japanese
English with Japanese subtitles – Marsha and Tad Aizumi, Japanese parents of a transgender son

Southeast Asian
Vietnamese with English subtitles – Ha Nguyen, a Vietnamese mother of a gay son
English with Lao subtitles – Phanida Phivilay, a Lao mother of a lesbian daughter

Filipino
English with Tagalog subtitles – Carol Mannion, a Filipina mother of a gay son

Family is Still Family - Filipino

None of the parents are actors. They are all everyday parents from different parts of the country.

Learn more about NQAPIA’s Family Acceptance Campaign

Download the leaflets

Attend the workshops

Parents of LGBTQ Korean Americans Launch Effort to Build Acceptance in Korean Immigrant Communities

Korean American Rainbow Parents (KARP) will kick off its outreach program in New York City with a film screening and community discussion, to be followed by a day-long seminar in Washington, D.C., for parents, activists, and allies from across the U.S. and Korea.

KARP Dol Screening

NEW YORK CITY, September 5, 2016 – Today, Korean American Rainbow Parents (KARP) announced the start of a national program of outreach and education for family members and allies of LGBTQ Korean Americans.

The initiative starts in New York City, with a film screening and community discussion on September 11, 2016, co-hosted by The Least of These Church in downtown Manhattan, the only LGBTQ-affirming Korean church in the Greater New York area. LGBTQ Korean Americans will share their stories and experiences of living with LGBTQ identities while being part of a community often known to be homophobic and transphobic. The event will also feature a screening of “Dol (First Birthday),” a short film by a Korean American director, Andrew Ahn, who made the film as a way of coming out to his parents as gay.

KARP’s outreach and education series will continue with a national seminar in Washington, D.C., on October 15, 2016, which is expected to bring dozens of Korean American parents and allies from across the country and from South Korea together for the first time. This watershed event will be the first chance for parents from across the country to build community with one another and start a conversation around how to support their LGBTQ family members’ struggle for rights and acceptance. Professor Namsoon Kang from Brite Divinity School will give a keynote address on acceptance of LGBTQ people in Christian communities.

The goal of KARP’s initiative is to provide Korean American families, especially those with LGBTQ-identifying members, with tools and strategies to see beyond their initial feelings of guilt, shame, and fear – and to instead celebrate their loved ones and help make the world safer and more accepting for them.

The need for KARP’s national effort is tremendous: Even within the broader Asian American and Pacific Islander community, LGBTQ Korean Americans face some of the strongest homophobic and transphobic pushback from their families and friends. Many cultural and historical forces drive Korean anti-LGBTQ sentiment. This has torn families apart, forced many Korean Americans to leave the community as they came out. And so far, there have been no known efforts by Korean American parents and allies to visibly support the LGBTQ community.

KARP – a coalition of accepting parents who openly support their LGBTQ kids – aims to change that. With the continued struggles of LGBTQ people in both South Korea and the U.S., it’s a crucial time for closeted parents and family members to come out in full solidarity with their LGBTQ loved ones.

Members of the media interested in learning more and/or attending both the New York City and Washington, D.C. events may contact Clara Yoon at karp.lgbtq@gmail.com. Interviews with Korean American parents and their LGBTQ loved ones may also be arranged by request.

NEW YORK CITY EVENT:
September 11, 2016
4-6 PM
The Least of These Church (Judson Memorial Church, Garden Room) , New York, NY 10012

WASHINGTON D.C. ALL-DAY SEMINAR:
October 15, 2016
Holy Cross Korean Episcopal Church
Fairfax, Virginia

These events are being sponsored or supported by following Korean American LGBTQ and Ally organizations:
Nabi USA – Washington DC (Butterfly for Hope Fund)
Coalition of Korean American (National and DC Chapter)
D.C. Korean Methodist Church
Holy Cross Korean Episcopal Church, Fairfax, Virginia
AAPI LGBTQ Parent Support Group of Greater Washington DC
API Rainbow Parents of PFLAG New York City (ARP PFLAG NYC)
The Least of These Church, New York, NY
Dari Project
National Queer Asian and Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)*

*NQAPIA is our fiscal sponsor.

CONTACT:

Clara Yoon – Korean American Rainbow Parents
Email: karp.lgbtq@gmail.com
Phone Number: 917.716.6705

Read PDF versions of the KARP Press Release in English or KARP Press Release in Korean.

NQAPIA 25% Discount at AAIFF

We are happy to partner with the Asian American International Film Festival (AAIFF) in presenting three films: Spa Night, LGBTQ Shorts, and Front Cover. AAIFF is the first and longest running festival in the country devoted to films by and about Asians & Asian Americans.

Asian American International Film Festival

NQAPIA supporters receive a 25% discounted rate for any film showing at AAIFF (excluding the Opening Spa Night, Centerpiece, and Closing Front Cover).

Select your tickets at http://aaiff.org/2016/schedule, and after you have added them to your Shopping Cart, enter the promo code NQAPIAaaiff16.

About the Sponsored Films

Opening Film: Spa Night
+ VIP Pre-Reception & Gala Celebration

6:00pm, Thurs., July 21 | Asia Society, 725 Park Ave., New York, NY 10021

Spa Night

Korean-American filmmaker Andrew Ahn’s debut feature film focuses on a young Korean-American man who tries to reconcile his obligations to his struggling immigrant family with his burgeoning sexual desires in the underground world of gay hookups at Korean spas in Los Angeles. SPA NIGHT premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival.

LGBTQ Shorts + Q&A

1:00pm, Sun., July 24 | Village East Cinema, 181-189 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003

Spa Night

This short film program explores the many ways that the LGBTQ and Asian American communities intersect. Some highlights include a lesbian Chinese daughter arguing with her mother about legalizing gay marriage in Ballot and a transgender, adopted activist returning to her native Korea in Coming Full Circle. NQAPIA’s own Janani (pictured in yellow) is in Gaysians, a patchwork documentary that explores relationships with family and culture.

Closing Film: Front Cover
+ Awards Ceremony & Reception

8:00pm, Sat., July 30 | Museum of Moving Image, 36-01 35th Ave, New York, NY, 11106

Front Cover

Hong Kong filmmaker Ray Yeung’s new film tells the story of a gay Chinese American who detests his Asian heritage and through talent and hard work, has attained his dream job as a celebrity fashion stylist. He soon comes into contact with a closeted actor from Beijing, and their working relationship soon becomes strained by their egos and differing opinions. But a mutual attraction begins to develop, and the stage is set for difficult choices between coming out and bowing to media pressure.

@asiancinevision     #aaiff2016

NQAPIA in the News

Our “Family is Still Family” Campaign is the first of its kind. This campaign features (1) multilingual public service announcements featured on Asian ethnic television channels, (2) a 12-city tour of family acceptance workshops, (3) multilingual leaflets translated in 19 Asian languages. On tv, in person, and by print, API families have a variety of resources that offer the powerful message family is still family, love is still love. Read more about the work that we’re doing through LGBT and Asian ethnic news:

MSNBC, May 29, 2016
‘Family is still family’ in LGBT ad campaign

Windy City Times, May 25, 2016
Group launches LGBTQ ads targeting Asian/Pacific Islander families

The Pride LA, May 19, 2016
Campaigning for greater Asian LGBT acceptance: ‘Family Is Still Family’

The Advocate, May 18, 2016
This Ad Campaign on Being Asian and LGBT Is Overdue

Korea Daily, May 18, 2016
성소수자 자녀는 죄인이 아닙니다

NBC News/NBC Asian America, May 18, 2016
‘Family Is Still Family’: Bilingual PSAs Bring Support, Community to LGBT Families

Korea Daily, May 18, 2016
내 몸이 내게 맞지 않는 거 같아

Singtao USA, May 18, 2016
星島日報

Korea Times, May 18, 2016
미주 한국일보 : “성소수자 아이들에 관심을…”

Voice of America, May 17, 2016
Asian-American Parents Struggle to Accept LGBT Children

Huffington Post Queer Voices, May 17, 2016
Coming Out to Our Asian Parents: Family Is Still Family

Gay Star News, May 16, 2016
Asian parents encouraged to ‘open the closet door’ for their LGBT kids in major new campaign

AsAmNews
Asian American Parents Open Closet Door for LGBT Kids

Windy City Times, May 11, 2016
Asian parents show support for LGBT children in new PSAs

Share the News

Repost these articles with any of these hashtags:

#FamilyIsStillFamily #FamilyPride #AAPI #Pride

Family is Still Family – Multilingual PSA campaign

Opening the Closet Door for our LGBTQ Kids

#FamilyIsStillFamily

A collage of 15 photos show API parents who love their LGBTQ children.

In the Asian, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (API) community, coming out to family can be difficult. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) children feel being open about sexual orientation will shame or dishonor their family, but staying in the closet takes a greater toll, causing isolation, depression, and even suicide.

NQAPIA has launched an international, multifaceted campaign to promote the acceptance of LGBTQ people in API families and to diversify the faces and languages of those who support the LGBTQ community. Our “Family is Still Family” campaign offers a powerful message: offer your LGBTQ child a lifeline, support their coming out, and keep the family strong and unified.

This campaign includes three parts:

We hope you share and enjoy our media, workshops, and challenging but important conversations!

Watch the Multilingual Videos

Family is Still Family - FilipinoNQAPIA worked with the Asian Pride Project to develop a series of short, multilingual videos of API parents who love their LGBTQ children. These groundbreaking PSAs feature parents, some of whom are foreign-born immigrants with limited English proficiency, who declare acceptance and unconditional love for their LGBTQ children.

Download the Translated Leaflets “Coming Out to API Families: Talking Points for API LGBTQ Youth”

English Leaflet: Family is Still FamilyNQAPIA and several parents developed a series of one-page, translated “fact sheets” for parents who have LGBTQ kids. The multilingual fact sheets answer basic questions about being LGBTQ and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (25) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBTQ document.

Attend a Workshop

API Parents Marsha, Clara, and LaurinJoin us for a workshop to hear Asian American parents share their experiences of confusion, fear, love, acceptance, and celebration of their LGBTQ children. We especially welcome parents of LGBTQ kids who would like to talk with other parents who understand the unique cultural issues in our communities, LGBTQ people who want to come out to their parents, or people who are struggling with family acceptance and want to understand different ways to bring them together. If you are already out to your parents, caregivers, or other family, we encourage you to bring them along!

Explore the calendar of events.

Sponsors and Supporters

The Family Acceptance Campaign is made possible by NQAPIA, Asian Pride Project, API PFLAG San Gabriel Valley, and PFLAG–NYC API Project, in partnership with Public Impact, Comcast/NBC Universal, and the CJ Huang Foundation.

NQAPIA thanks the generous support of the Arcus Foundation, David Bohnett Foundation, API Dream Team Giving Circle, PFLAG, GSA Network, Advocates for Youth, Project by Project, and countless individuals.

Join us in supporting this work by making a donation.

What Do We Mean when We Say #APIs4BlackLives?

Why and how do we show up in solidarity with the Movement for Black Lives? What do we really mean when we say #APIs4BlackLives?

QAPIs4BlackLives

Click the image to watch NQAPIA’s QAPIs4BlackLives video

Hear members of the NQAPIA family talk about their personal experiences with police, where their solidarity comes from, and why they are engaged in their communities to support local #BlackLivesMatter organizing. Hear from some of the voices that are typically marginalized in Asian spaces: Southeast Asians, South Asians, trans & gender non-conforming folks, working-class people, and people at the intersection of these and other identities.

Now is the time to have hard conversations about solidarity in our communities. Please share our #QAPIs4BlackLives video (bit.ly/QAPIs4BlackLivesVideo) on Facebook andTwitter and lift up these API voices that we rarely hear.

Are you interested in continuing this conversation in your community space, organization, or school? Email sasha@nqapia.org to talk about scheduling a training.

Japanese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

Parents_Japanese_web

Japanese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

This month of June, tune into your local Asian Television station, and see Japanese parents who love their transgender children.

English with Japanese subtitles – Marsha and Tad Aizumi, Japanese parents of a transgender son

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Japanese leaflet (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

Chinese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Parents_Chinese_web

Chinese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have Asian American parents who love their LGBT kids say that… on television… in Chinese? In June, tune in to your local Asian Television station, and see for yourselves!

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Asian ethnic television stations will air these videos during the month of June.

Mandarin with English subtitles – Deanna Cheng, a Chinese mother of a gay son
Cantonese with English subtitles – Rosetta Lai, a Chinese mother of a lesbian daughter

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of transgender and genderqueer kids as well. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Chinese
Simplified script leaflet (click to view and download)
Traditional script leaflet (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.