Make sure your loved ones get the health insurance they need before December 15

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act (or “Obamacare”), more LGBTQ Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders have health insurance than ever before.  The uninsured rate for low- and middle-income LGBTQ people has dropped by an overwhelming 35%.  That means access to health care we need, from life-saving HIV drugs to gender affirming health services.

Trumps’ sabotage attempts have failed.  The Affordable Care Act is stronger than ever. There are more insurers than before, prices are stable, and 8 in 10 people get a discount on their premiums. In fact, most people can find health insurance for under $75/month.

Plus, you can still expect to be treated fairly and protected from discrimination in health insurance AND health care. We know the headlines are confusing—and our community is under attack—but nothing has changed when it comes to health care. You should never face be mistreated simply for being who you are.

What do you need to know:

  • HealthCare.gov is open for business beginning on November 1st. The FINAL DEADLINE to enroll in health insurance is December 15th. If you do not enroll during this time, you may be locked out of health insurance until 2019. Make sure you and your loved ones have health insurance—if not, head to HealthCare.gov now.
  • You can get free, LGBTQ-friendly help from someone who understands their health insurance questions. Make an appointment today.
  • HealthCare.gov is the only place you can get financial help and true coverage. Don’t get duped by a junk plan—get your coverage at HealthCare.gov.

Don’t forget—the LAST DAY to enroll in health insurance is December 15th. Let’s take pride in our health this year and make sure we all #GetCovered

Spread the word. Post images below, and translations in various Asian languages on social media, and make sure your loved ones are insured.

To learn more, visit Out2Enroll, the national campaign to empower LGBTQ individuals and communities to get access to health care.

 

Voting & elections

Before Election Day

  1. Register to vote: https://www.rockthevote.org/

    Use the National Voter Registration Form to register in Chinese, Bengali, Hindi, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Tagalog, Khmer, and Vietnamese. https://www.eac.gov/voters/national-mail-voter-registration-form/

  2. Election Protection: Volunteer with the Asian American Legal Defense & Education Fund to monitor poll sites and defend our community’s right to vote. www.aaldef.net

Voting on Election Day

  1. Identification is often required to vote.  Voters should not be turned away because of gender marker discrepancies.
  2. If there is a problem, demand to vote by “provisional” ballot.
  3. Limited English proficient voters have a right to bring someone with them to interpret. Some poll sites have translated ballots.
  4. Report any voting problems to AALDEF at 800-966-5946 (Multilingual Voter Hotline)
  5. Voting is only the first step in fighting for the rights of LGBT API people.  Regardless of who wins, we must also write letters, sign petitions, lobby, rally, and demonstrate for our demands. Contact NQAPIA to get involved.

Facts

9.3 million eligible Asian American and Pacific Islander voters this November.  Increase from 8 million in 2012.

By 2060, one out of ten Americans will be of Asian descent.

APIs are the nation’s fastest growing minority group and an increasing segment of the LGBT community

APIs are the largest set of new immigrants (legal and undocumented) to the United States.

In 2000, only 537 votes in Florida decided the Presidency between Al Gore and George Bush.  Every vote counts.

   

   

Candidate Voter Guides

Check out our multilingual (English, Korean, Hindi, Vietnamese, and Chinese) voter guides for upcoming Senate and Governor races:

California Governor & US Senate

Florida Governor & US Senate

Georgia Governor

New Jersey US Senate

Nevada US Senate

New York Governor & US Senate

Ohio Governor

Pennsylvania Governor & US Senate

Texas Governor & US Senate

Wisconsin US Senate

 

 

NQAPIA legal fellowships

National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)

POST-GRADUATE LEGAL FELLOWSHIPS

Since the Election of Donald Trump, the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance’s legal program has expanded to include greater impact litigation and direct legal services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders (APIs).  NQAPIA is a federation of LGBTQ API organizations.  

NQAPIA is seeking talented third year law students to work with NQAPIA in designing a Fellowship on the following legal projects:

  • Impact Litigation for LGBT APIs: NQAPIA participates in federal appellate advocacy and impact litigation to inform the courts and the public of the impact certain laws will have on LGBT Asian Americans, LGBTs of color, and LGBT immigrants.  NQAPIA led the LGBT brief in the legal challenge to President Trump’s anti-Muslim travel ban, and lawsuits defending immigrant sanctuary cities in Texas, California, and Chicago. Legal interns assist in legal research, writing appellate briefs, and learn federal amicus practice.
  • Legal Services for LGBT APIs: More and more LGBT Asian Americans and LGBT immigrants are seeking legal advice on a range of issues in family, immigration, and criminal law.  Interns conduct legal intakes, issue-spot areas of law, and refer client matters to practitioners in specific areas of law in particular jurisdictions.
  • Legal Trainings: Interns develop, administer and, in some instances, give “Know Your Rights” workshops for LGBT API community leaders and organizations across the nation.  Topics include immigrants’ rights, trans rights, nonprofit law, and 501c3 compliance.
  • Advocacy for LGBT APIs: NQAPIA advocates on a range of federal and state public policy issues that affect LGBT Asian Americans, LGBTs of color, and LGBT immigrants.  Interns research the LGBT impact of mainstream civil rights issues and the racial impact of LGBT rights issues. Interns develop policy papers, write updates, and conduct administrative agency advocacy on various issues at the intersection of racial justice and queerness.

NQAPIA legal fellows are supervised and supported by seasoned civil rights attorneys.  Interested applicants should send a resume and cover letter, and any bilingual ability (helpful bit not required) to glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org and write “NQAPIA Legal Fellow Search” in the Subject line.

NQAPIA legal internships

National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)

LEGAL INTERNSHIPS  

Since the Election of Donald Trump, the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance’s legal program has expanded to include greater impact litigation and direct legal services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders (APIs).  NQAPIA is a federation of LGBTQ API organizations. NQAPIA is seeking talented law students to assist in the following legal projects:

  • Impact Litigation for LGBT APIs: NQAPIA federal appellate advocacy participates in impact litigation to inform the courts and the public of the impact certain laws will have on LGBT Asian Americans, LGBTs of color, and LGBT immigrants.  NQAPIA led the LGBT brief in the legal challenge to President Trump’s anti-Muslim travel ban, and lawsuits defending immigrant sanctuary cities in Texas, California, and Chicago. Legal interns assist in legal research, writing appellate briefs, and learn federal amicus practice.
  • Legal Services for LGBT APIs: More and more LGBT Asian Americans and LGBT immigrants are seeking legal advice on a range of issues in family, immigration, and criminal law.  Interns conduct legal intakes, issue-spot areas of law, and refer client matters to practitioners in specific areas of law in particular jurisdictions.
  • Legal Trainings: Interns develop, administer and, in some instances, give “Know Your Rights” workshops for LGBT API community leaders and organizations across the nation.  Topics include immigrants’ rights, trans rights, nonprofit law, and 501c3 compliance.
  • Advocacy for LGBT APIs: NQAPIA advocates on a range of federal and state public policy issues that affect LGBT Asian Americans, LGBTs of color, and LGBT immigrants.  Interns research the LGBT impact of mainstream civil rights issues and the racial impact of LGBT rights issues. Interns develop policy papers, write updates, and conduct administrative agency advocacy on various issues at the intersection of racial justice and queerness.

Description of Internships.  

NQAPIA legal interns conduct legal research, hone their legal writing skills, understand federal appellate advocacy, and conduct client intakes.  NQAPIA interns are supervised and supported by seasoned civil rights attorneys. Interns also learn parallel social change strategies in grassroots organizing and public education/ media.  

These internships are not paid positions, but academic credit can be arranged.  During the academic year, interns work between 10-25 hours per week. During the summer, at least 25 hours to full-time.  Internships typically last ten (10) weeks. Interns may work remotely from other parts of the country.

To Apply:

Interested applicants should send a resume and cover letter, stating the number of hours they are looking to work per week, if academic credit is sought, and any bilingual ability (helpful bit not required) to:

NQAPIA Legal Intern Search

Email: glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org

Write: “Intern Applicant: NAME” in the Subject.  

For more information, contact Glenn D. Magpantay, Esq. at glenn_magpantay@nqapia.org or 917-439-3158.  Or goto www.nqapia.org

 

LGBTQ Asian Pacific Islander Activists Mobilize for Racial Justice, Immigrants’ Rights & Trans Liberation

Conference attendees in front of our step and repeat (photo by Lanny Li)

More than 650 LGBTQ Asian Pacific Islanders from around the world are meeting in San Francisco this weekend to hone skills, build community, and celebrate achievements.

The attendees are in the Bay Area to take part in “Growing Home,” the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance’s National Conference. The conference is host to more than 100 workshops on racial justice, immigrants’ rights, LGBTQ equality, trans justice, religious acceptance, youth organizing, sexual liberation, and more.

This year’s turnout is unprecedented — more than twice the number who attended the previous NQAPIA National Conference in 2015.

“After relentless attacks, our community must come together to heal from political trauma, support each other, and strategize for our movement,” said Glenn D. Magpantay, NQAPIA’s Executive Director.

M Lin speaking to a crowd at the NQAPIA conference (photo by Lanny Li)

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, APIs are the nation’s fastest growing racial group and the largest segment of immigrants — both legal and undocumented — coming to the United States. The Williams Institute at UCLA also found that the LGBTQ immigrant population is disproportionately API.

Even as more and more LGBTQ API people come out of the closet, they still face invisibility, isolation, and stereotyping within both API and LGBTQ communities. Sometimes they are profiled as terrorists, gang members, or spies for China. Their needs are often overlooked. NQAPIA’s National Conference provides a starting point to address these challenges, by bringing together the LGBTQ API community to brainstorm and plan collaborations toward social and political change.

“In my queer inclusion and intersectionality work…I am consistently urging folks to normalize and center queer people of color,” said Naushaba Patel of the Montrose Center in Houston. “I can’t even imagine how healing it will be for my psyche to be surrounded by hundreds of queer API folks. I hope that it will help me find a sense of true belonging within my own complex identities.”

Welcome reception attendees at the conference (photo by Lanny Li)

Affirming parents of LGBTQ kids and religious leaders of inclusive congregations are also attending the conference to organize and build power in support of the LGBTQ API community.

Karen Murakami, a mother of two gay sons, recently moved to Texas, where she said the political climate and attitudes toward LGBTQ people are different compared to when she lived in California. At the NQAPIA conference, she said she is hoping to reconnect with other parents who are also pushing for LGBTQ acceptance within API communities and religious spaces.

“I’m most excited to hear what they have been doing in their local areas, so I can continue to be inspired and take that energy back to Texas,” Karen said. “I believe if we can change just one heart, it has been worth it.”

The presenters at NQAPIA’s National Conference represent a multigenerational group of leaders and community members from across the Asian and Pacific Islander diasporas. They include Malaysian LGBTQ activist Thilaga Sulathireh, Virginia Commonwealth University student Khudai Tanveer, Hollywood producer Christopher Lee, and Rev. Danilio Cortez, an ordained Southern Baptist Minister and proud father of a gay son.

For many of the LGBTQ attendees, the conference is an opportunity to relish in a sense of home and commune with a chosen family that some may not have thought was possible.

Workshop Attendees (Photo by Lanny Li)

Neo Veavea, an LGBTQ activist of Samoan descent, said he remembers going out to the Castro neighborhood in San Francisco as a young man and being double-carded by bouncers, ignored by bartenders, and ostracized by the mostly-white crowd.

In response, Neo helped start United Territories of Pacific Islanders Alliances (U.T.O.P.I.A.), a community group for queer and trans Pacific Islanders, in 1998. U.T.O.P.I.A. has since expanded to chapters in Hawaii, Seattle, Portland, New York, and San Diego.

Neo, who recently turned 61 and is running for city office in San Francisco, said he is most excited “to be surrounded by leaders of our community and youth who are eager to learn” at the conference.

“I know it’s going to be a powerful, positive gathering,” he said.

Emerging Equality: The State of the LGBTQ Movement in Asia

SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 26 — International queer activists gathered today in San Francisco’s Chinatown to discuss the state of LGBTQ organizing in Asia.

Joya Sikder speaks at international media briefing at NQAPIA conference (photo by Lanny Li)

The activists hailed from Vietnam, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Japan, and China. They shared personal stories and political updates regarding their countries’ cultural and legal stances toward LGBTQ people.

The speakers were in town as part of “Growing Home,” the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance’s National Conference. The conference brought together more than 650 queer and trans Asian Pacific Islander people from around the globe to hear the international speakers, as well as to attend more than 100 workshops on racial justice, immigrants’ rights, LGBTQ equality, trans justice, religious acceptance, youth organizing, and more.

Amazin LêThi, a Vietnamese author and former natural competitive bodybuilder, said at the press conference that playing sports as an LGBTQ young person helped her build confidence, find community, and gain leadership skills. Now, Amazin creates sports training, business, leadership, and career development opportunities for LGBTQ youth in Vietnam through her organization, the Amazin LêThi Foundation.

“In Vietnam, unlike in some other Asian countries, being LGBTQ isn’t illegal, but it also isn’t protected by law. We were the first country in Asia to discuss marriage equality in the government, and since 2012 we have had Vietpride, starting in Hanoi. Since 2017, we’ve had 35 Vietprides across the nation,” Amazin said. “However, Vietnam is still a conservative society. There is family and social pressure to conform, get married, and have children.”

Amazin lamented the lack of social and institutional support systems for LGBTQ youth in Vietnam, mentioning that she too had experienced homelessness as an LGBTQ person.

“We have no anti-bullying programs or rainbow programs within the school system and it’s common for rainbow youth to experience discrimination and bullying. Many youth are made homeless because of their sexuality and gender identity,” she said.

Japanese activist Mamiko Moda helped start a group called Kodomap, which supports LGBTQ people who want to have kids or already have kids. There is strong cultural stigma against LGBTQ couples raising children in Japan, and same-sex couples cannot get legally married, she said.

“When my partner came out to herself as a lesbian, she was quite sad because she thought she would not be able to have kids. Because of the traditional family way of thinking, even people who are LGBTQ told my partner that it is not right to have kids as a lesbian because kids need love from both a mother and a father,” Mamiko said.

“There are so many things we need to know, and so many things to think about — like how the current laws affect LGBTQ parents and kids, what the legal risks are, how to find donors, and how to deal with clinics and hospitals since they don’t handle LGBTQ cases,” she added.

Kevin Lin spoke about the first time he met out-and-proud LGBTQ Chinese people — along with their supportive, affirming family members — at a PFLAG China meeting in 2016. That experience, he said, motivated him to become an LGBTQ activist in Shanghai.

He is now the training coordinator for PFLAG China, which has more than 3,000 volunteers to support the LGBTQ community in China.

“I want to send a message to you: China is coming out,” he said.

The Impact of the Expected Proposed Public Charge Regulation on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Immigrants and Their Families  

 

What is the Expected Proposed Public Charge Regulation?

As part of its continuing scapegoating and attacks on immigrants and refugees, the Trump administration is expected to propose a radical expansion of an immigration law that could deny permanent residence (“green cards”) to hundreds of thousands of immigrants.[i] Under current immigration law, applicants for permanent residence are required to prove that they are “not likely to become a public charge.” This requirement for green card applicants has been interpreted as proving that one will not rely on government cash assistance programs (such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF)) for future income. For at least two decades, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has explicitly excluded the past or current participation in non-cash programs such as Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as Food Stamps), and the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), as part of the public charge requirement. The expected proposed regulation would reverse that long-standing interpretation of the public charge law, and begin including participation in these non-cash programs in making decisions about whether to grant an applicant a green card. The proposed regulation would also make use of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the tax credits that make health insurance purchased through the federal and state health insurance marketplaces under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) more affordable, part of the public charge requirement that could result in the denial of permanent residence.

Who Are LGBT Immigrants?
The expected proposed public charge regulation would have significant harmful effects on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) immigrants and their families. There are an estimated 904,000 LGBT immigrants living throughout the U.S.[ii] While there are no specific data collected or reported by the Departments of Homeland Security or State about LGBT immigrants, LGBT individuals always have, and will continue to, use family-based, employment-based, and other available categories to apply for lawful permanent residence in the U.S.[iii] For example, LGBT immigrants in same-sex marriages are recognized as spouses under U.S. immigration law after the 2013 U.S. Supreme Court decision in U.S. v. Windsor, declaring the misnamed-Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional. LGBT individuals with higher education and skills often are able to use employment-based visas to work in multi-national and domestic corporations that welcome and support diverse employees, including LGBT employees. Since the 1990’s, LGBT refugees who are fleeing persecution based on their sexual orientation or gender identity have been able to find legal protection in the U.S., but often face many hurdles in proving their claims to persecution. Finally, there are an estimated 36,000 LGBT individuals that have received Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status.[iv]

How Would the Proposed Public Charge Regulation Impact LGBT Immigrants and Their Families?
Similar to other immigrants, not all LGBT immigrants and their families have achieved economic success and financial security. Many LGBT immigrants and their families struggle economically, and use some of the government programs that would make them ineligible for permanent residence under the proposed public charge regulation. As an intersectional subset of both the immigrant and LGBT populations, it is likely that tens of thousands of LGBT immigrants and their families, including those with U.S. citizen children, are using Medicaid, CHIP, SNAP, WIC, and other government programs to assist themselves and their families with health insurance, nutrition, and other supports.

For example, an estimated 11% of LGBT adults ages 18-64 use Medicaid as their health insurance program.[v] An estimated 27% of LGBT adults ages 18-44 use SNAP, with higher utilization rates among racial and ethnic minority LGBT adults and those with children.[vi] Some subset of these LGBT adults are LGBT immigrants and their families, who will be impacted by the proposed public charge regulation.

How Does Continuing Discrimination Make LGBT Immigrants and Their Families More Economically Vulnerable?
Moreover, because of continuing discrimination based on their sexual orientation and gender identity, LGBT immigrants, similar to all LGBT individuals, face additional challenges in accessing and maintaining education, employment, housing, and health care, and may be more likely to need assistance with basic family supports such as health insurance and nutrition programs. Specifically:

  • LGBT people continue to experience discrimination in education, employment, housing, health care, and access to credit, with no legal protections against such discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in a majority of states;[vii] the experience of discrimination is even higher among LGBT people of color;[viii] therefore, LGBT immigrants may be more likely to use some of these government programs designed to help working families with health care, nutrition, and other basic family supports
  • Transgender individuals, especially transgender women of color, are at the greatest risk of unemployment and poverty, as a direct result of discrimination and violence based on their gender identity and race;[ix] therefore, transgender immigrants may be more likely to use some of these government programs
  • Lesbian-headed families, especially families of lesbians of color, are more likely to have lower incomes as a result of the combination of sex, sexual orientation, and race-based discrimination and pay inequity for women;[x] therefore, lesbian immigrants and their families may be more likely to use nutrition, health, and other government programs designed to support low-income children and families[xi]
  • Prior to the implementation of the ACA, gay men and transgender individuals living with HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, and other medical conditions, especially young gay men of color and transgender women of color, often were prevented from accessing health insurance and health care because of their pre-existing medical condition;[xii] therefore, transgender immigrants and gay immigrants of color are more likely to now be covered by expanded Medicaid (which expanded coverage to low-income individuals who do not have children) and through ACA health insurance marketplaces, which provide tax credit subsidies to ensure affordability and access[xiii]
  • Only 19 states and the District of Columbia prohibit the denial of health insurance coverage for medically necessary transgender health care;[xiv] while the ACA established the first federal protections against discrimination based on gender identity in health care, the Trump administration is actively working to undo that protection;[xv] meanwhile, these nondiscrimination policies have meant that more transgender individuals, including transgender immigrants, have been able to access medically necessary care through ACA health insurance plans

The multiple and intersectional identities of LGBT immigrants means greater risk for a lifetime of discrimination that restricts educational, employment, and other opportunities. These cumulative and compounding experiences of discrimination make transgender immigrants, especially transgender women immigrants of color, and lesbian immigrants, especially lesbian immigrants of color, particularly vulnerable. The proposed public charge regulation threatening denial of permanent residence for simply using government programs that provide low-income families with health care, nutrition, and other basic support would impose the untenable choice on LGBT immigrants and their families between dis-enrolling from these safety net programs, or jeopardizing their future immigration status.

How Can We Respond to the Expected Proposed Public Charge Regulation?
The proposed public charge regulation is expected to be published any day now. Once it is published, there will be 60 days for the public to submit comments. Both organizational and individual comments opposing the proposal can be submitted. There is a national campaign preparing to mobilize hundreds of thousands of comments against the proposed regulation, including providing sample comments and online platforms to submit comments.[xvi] It is vital that LGBT individuals, organizations, and communities spread the word about this proposal and join in opposing it.

Prepared for NQAPIA by:

Ignatius Bau
1067 Market Street Suite 3007
San Francisco, CA 94103
ignatius.bau@gmail.com
June 2018

 

[i] Protecting Immigrant Families, The Trump Administration’s “Public Charge” Attack on Immigrant Families, 2018, at: https://www.nilc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Public-Charge-Fact-Sheet-2018.pdf

[ii] Gates GJ. LGBT Adult Immigrants in the United States, The Williams Institute, 2013, at: https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/LGBTImmigrants-Gates-Mar-2013.pdf

[iii] Immigration Equality at: https://www.immigrationequality.org/get-legal-help/our-legal-resources/#.Wy0mQ1Mvz6a

[iv] Conron K, Brown TNT. LGBT DREAMers and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, The Williams Institute, February 2017, at https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/LGBT-DREAMers-and-DACA-February-2017.pdf

[v] Conron KJ, Goldberg SK. LGBT Adults on Medicaid, The Williams Institute, 2018, at: https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/LGBT-Medicaid.pdf

[vi] Brown TNT, Romero AP, Gates GJ. Food Insecurity and SNAP Participation in the LGBT Community, The Williams Institute, 2016, at: https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Food-Insecurity-and-SNAP-Participation-in-the-LGBT-Community.pdf

[vii] Movement Advancement Project, Non-Discrimination Laws, at: http://www.lgbtmap.org/equality-maps/non_discrimination_laws

[viii] Paying an Unfair Price: The Financial Penalty for LGBT People of Color in America, Center for American Progress and Movement Advancement Project, 2015, at: http://www.lgbtmap.org/file/paying-an-unfair-price-lgbt-people-of-color.pdf; Kastanis A, Wilson B. Race/Ethnicity, Gender, and Socioeconomic Wellbeing of Individuals in Same-Sex Couples, The Williams Institute, 2014, at: https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Census-Compare-Feb-2014.pdf

[ix] National Center for Transgender Equality, U.S. Transgender Survey, 2016, at: https://transequality.org/sites/default/files/docs/usts/USTS-Full-Report-Dec17.pdf

[x] Kastanis A, Gates GJ. LGBT African Americans and African-American Same-Sex Couples, The Williams Institute, 2013, at: http://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Census-AFAMER-Oct-2013.pdf; Kastanis A, Gates GJ. LGBT Latino/as and Latino/a Same-Sex Couples, Williams Institute, 2013, at: https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Census-2010-Latino-Final.pdf; Kastanis A, Gates GJ. LGBT Asian Pacific Islander Individuals and Same-Sex Couples, Williams Institute, 2013,at: https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Census-2010-API-Final.pdf

[xi] Badgett MVL Durso LE, Schneebaum A. New Patterns of Poverty in the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community, The Williams Institute, 2013, at: https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/LGB-Poverty-Update-Jun-2013.pdf

[xii] Helping People with HIV Navigate the Transition from Coverage to Care, Kaiser Family Foundation, 2013, at: https://kaiserfamilyfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/8462-helping-people-with-hiv-navigate-the-transition.pdf; Kates J, Ranji U, Beamesderfer A, Salganicoff A, Dawson L. Health and Access to Care and Coverage for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Individuals in the U.S., Kaiser Family Foundation, 2018, at: http://files.kff.org/attachment/Issue-Brief-Health-and-Access-to-Care-and-Coverage-for-LGBT-Individuals-in-the-US

[xiii] Baker K, Durso LE. Why repealing the Affordable Care Act is bad medicine for LGBT communities, Center for American Progress, March 22, 2017, at: https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/lgbt/news/2017/03/22/428970/repealing-affordable-care-act-bad-medicine-lgbt-communities/; Baker K, Durso LE, Cray A. Moving the needle: The impact of the Affordable Care Act on LGBT communities, Center for American Progress, November 17, 2014, at: https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/lgbt/reports/2014/11/17/101575/moving-the-needle/

[xiv] Movement Advancement Project, Healthcare Laws and Policies, at: http://www.lgbtmap.org/equality-maps/healthcare_laws_and_policies

[xv] Pear R. Trump plan would cut back health care protections for transgender people, New York Times, April 21, 2018, at: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/21/us/politics/trump-transgender-health-care.html

[xvi] Protecting Immigrant Families Campaign Resources, at: https://www.clasp.org/protecting-immigrant-families-campaign-resources

FAQ

Need a question answered?
Please visit these links before you reach out!

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Where will the conference take place?
A: The Hilton Hotel on 750 Kearny Street in Chinatown, SF. It is a 15-minute walk from the Montgomery Bart station and is right in front of a Muni bus lines, the 8, 8AX, and 8BX. The hotel is a 30 minute drive from the nearest airport: SFO.

Q: What is the nearest airport I should fly into?
A: San Francisco International Airport (SFO)

Q: How do I book a room at the Hilton hotel?
A: A special, discounted conference rate of  $169 per night per room plus tax is available. You must book your discounted hotel room by July 1, 2018 with the reservation code “NQAPIA” and hotel code “SFOFD.”
Book your discounted hotel room through this Hilton link: hilton.com/en/hi/groups/personalized/S/SFOFDHF-NQAPIA-20180726/index.jhtml

Q: Are you all accepting anymore workshop requests?
A: No.

Q: Will the conference have access to child care?
A: There will be experienced childcare providers on-site and will be available from 9AM – 5PM on the 1st floor of the conference hotel. There will not be any childcare access during the evening events.

Q: Can I purchase tickets for specific days of the conference?
A: Yes! Ticket rates are as follows:

  • $350 – Corporate/ Government Rate
  • $300 – Regular Rate
  • $250 – NQAPIA Member Group
  • $225 – Workshop Present Rate
  • $150 – Limited-Income/ Student Rate
  • $55 – Thursday, One-Day only
  • $85 – Friday, One-Day only
  • $85 – Saturday, One-Day only
  • $75 – Sunday, One-Day Only

Q: I haven’t heard back about my scholarship application and I need to book my flight ASAP. When will I hear back?
A: Scholarship notifications are on a rolling deadline. We are trying our best to notify folks every Friday.

Q: Is the conference accessible for people with different abilities?
A: Absolutely. Our local host committee is dedicated to making your conference experience the most accessible, safe, fun, and comfortable! We actually have an Access Team that has been working year round to making sure every corner of the conference is accessible to our diverse community.

Q: I’m an ally (white and/or straight). Am i allowed to go to the conference?
A: All allies are welcome to enjoy the whole conference, except the closed caucuses.

Q: What are some activities I can do in the local area?
A: We will have a directory available for you coming soon.

Q: Where can I see all the workshops offered?
A: Whether you are a seasoned leader or just coming out, there is something for everyone.  All the 2018 conference workshops and caucuses are here.

Q: I can’t afford the conference, what are some opportunities I can access?
A: Apply for our scholarship or apply to host a fundraising with a $500 matching grant!

 

A Letter from API Parents who Love Our LGBTQ+ Children

We are Asian and South Asian parents who love our LGBTQ+ children and we are very excited to be part of Growing Home, NQAPIA’s 2018 National Conference, in San Francisco this July 26-29. We would love for you to join us there. Register HERE.

If you are an API LGBTQ+ person, please consider inviting your parents or other family members to come along! Just like past conferences, it will be an unforgettable experience of connection, unconditional love, and learning.

As parents, we know that many LGBTQ+ people struggle with how and when to come out or disclose their identities to their families. Relationships with families can be complex and challenging. If this is your experience, attend one of our workshops. If your family is supportive of you, please invite them to attend. Many families find it exciting and empowering to connect with API LGBTQ+ community members and with other families. It can also be a place to address questions and concerns they may have.

We will provide spaces for intergenerational dialogue, and for parents/caregivers of LGBTQ+ children to come together. These will include:

  • workshops on family acceptance
  • networking caucus for parent/caregivers of LGBTQ+ children
  • creating safe spaces for LGBTQ+ people and their parents and family.

We are also excited to help welcome visitors from six different Asian countries, including a parent from Japan!

We hope that you will join us at the conference! We’d love to meet you and give you a hug!

You are beautiful,
Marsha Aizumi
Rosetta Lai
Laurin Mayeno
Karen Murakami
Aruna Rao
Aya Yabe
Clara Yoon

Family is Still Family

LGBTQ API Athletes: Julie Chu