Upcoming events, meetings, debates, summits, conferences, and more.

schedule, workshops, and caucuses

Find a full conference schedule with locations here: 2018 Workshop Schedule

Find a list of the 2018 conference workshops here: NQAPIA Sessions – Workshops

Find a list of the 2018 conference caucuses here: NQAPIA Sessions – Caucuses

As always, registration for the conference is at bit.ly/nqapia2018.

You can also find the workshop schedule in grid and table format below.
Grid Format
Table Format

 

Finally, you can download the conference schedule app Whova here.

Community Catalyst Awards

NQAPIA’s National LGBTQ API Conference will feature the Community Catalyst Awards Gala where we will recognize organizations and individuals who have made significant impact to improve the lives and advance for the interests of the LGBTQ API community, enhanced their organizations’ infrastructure and programs, or demonstrated exemplary partnership with NQAPIA.

We invite you to nominate yourself, your organization, or another for one of these prestigious nationally acclaimed awards. Top nominees will be announced and the award will be presented at the National Community Catalyst Awards Ceremony in San Francisco, Saturday July 29, 2018.  The awardee or a representative of the recipient must be present to accept the award. No awards in abstentia allowed.

List of awards and award categories are below, and the nomination form is here.

NQAPIA Board & Staff at the 2016 Community Catalyst Awards in New Orleans

MEMBER GROUP AWARDS – 4 categories

Only LGBT API organizations may be nominated for these awards.

LGBTQ Visibility Award
This award is given to the member group that has demonstrated the strongest visibility efforts of the LGBTQ API community.

Community Education Award
This award recognizes the member group that has actively engaged and educated its community members around issues that directly impact the LGBTQ API community

Community Building and Programs Award
This award highlights the member group with the most dynamic programs that have bult community for LGBTQ APIs.

Advocacy Award
This award highlights the member group that has participated in significant grassroots and public policy advocacy activities and programs, and encouraged their base to take action.

NQAPIA PROGRAMS AWARDS – 4 categories

Any organization may be nominated for these awards.

Most Impactful “9/11” Action Award
This award highlights the organization that coordinated the most awesome action during NQAPIA’s 9/11 action.

The Family Acceptance Award
This award highlights an organization that has prompted family acceptance and supported parents of LGBT kids

Most Ground-Breaking Convergence Award
This award goes to the member group that coordinated the most meaningful Convergence.

The Anti-Viral Award (The Fight HIV/AIDS Award)
This award goes to the member group that has done the most impactful work to fight the spread of AIDS/HIV in the API community by promoting testing and treatment, or publicity for National API HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.

SPECIAL RECOGNITION AWARDS – 2 categories

Corporate Diversity & Inclusion Award
This award recognizes a company that has excelled in promoting diversity and inclusion of both LGBTQ and API people, through an equity lens and corporate social responsibility.

The Legal Eagle Award
This award recognizes a law firm who has dedicated considerable pro bono hours to defending and prompting the legal rights of LGBTQ APIs.

CONFERENCE AWARDS – 2 categories

Growing Home (The Revolutionary Award)
This award uplifts an individual or organization that pushes the envelope towards LGBTQ API liberation. Their actions and politics will significantly pave the way towards a radically inclusive world where people from all race, gender, sexuality, ability, status, and class can be their full authentic selves.

Best Fundraiser to Get to the Conference Award
This award goes to the member group that hosted the most creative fundraiser for their members to get to the conference (not necessarily who raised the most money).

Biggest Turnout (The “Size Queen” Award)
This award goes to the organization (not necessarily a member group) that brought the most members to the conference.  No nominees accepted.  Based on registration.

INDIVIDUAL AWARDS – 3 categories

Longevity Award
This award recognized a person in the Bay Area who has consistently and tirelessly fought for the API LGBTQ community (15 year minimum)

This person must reside in the Bay Area.

NQAPIA Board MVP (Most Valuable Player) Award
This award highlights a board member who has contributed the most to NQAPIA’s vision, capacity, fundraising, governance, and long-term planning over the last year.

This person must be a current member of the NQAPIA Board of Directors.

Conference Planning Committee MVP Award
This award highlights the conference planning committee member who has contributed the most to ensuring a successful, inclusive, and powerful national conference.

This person must be a current member of the Conference Planning Committee.

 

Instructions

  • Self nomination are allowed and encouraged (do not be shy in claiming our victories and successes)
  • Each entry allows only one nomination for one award.  You may nominate multiple people or multiple organizations for the same award or for different awards BUT each nominee-award must be entered separately as a new entry.  (use cut & paste)
  • Provide your name and email as the Nominator
  • Provide the nominees’ name, email, city/state.  Add contact name if organization.
  • Describe why the person or organization is deserving of the award. 3-5 paragraphs max.
  • All nominations due June 22.
  • Nominees will be notified that they have been nominated for the award by June 29
  • Award presented on July 28 at NQAPIA’s National Community Catalyst Awards Ceremony in San Francisco.

Nominations form here: https://goo.gl/forms/DmLbPkSZnfiZzCea2

2018 National Conference Sponsors

As of June 25, 2018

Gold
Bohnett Foundation
Marguerite Casey Foundation

Pearl
AARP (American Association of Retired Persons)
Comcast / NBC Universal
Masto Foundation
The California Endowment

JADE
Aratani Foundation
AT&T
Caesars’ Entertainment
GSA Network
Grindr for Equality
Human Rights Campaign (HRC)
Kiran Bavikatte Foundation
Macy’s
National API LGBT Giving Circle
National Education Association (NEA)
Office of Minority Health Resource Center / DHHS
Planned Parenthood Federation of American
Rosenberg Foundation
Security and Rights Collaborative at the Proteus Fund

LOTUS
A Parent Who Loves their LGBTQ Kid
Advocates for Youth
API Dream Team
GAPA Foundation
General Electric (GE)
National Center for Lesbian Rights
Verizon
Weston Miliken

Jasmine
Atlanta Pride
Asian Pacific Islander Queer Women and Transgender Community (APIQWTC)
Gay Asian Pacific Alliance (GAPA)
Kaiser Permanente
Horizons Foundation
National Korean American Service & Education Consortium (NAKASEC)
Horizons Foundation
National LGBTQ Task Force

Conference Event Sponsors
API PFLAG SGV co-sponsor of the Faith Convening
Kaiser Permanente for mental health workshop
San Francisco AIDS Foundation for Opening Reception and STD/HIV/AIDS Testing
Tides Foundation for the Funder Briefing
Red Envelope Giving Circle as a workshop sponsor for “You’ve Got To Be Kidding Me! Expanding Our Families With Babies and More”
AAPIP San Francisco and Silicon Valley Chapter for the Funder Briefing
Marguerite Casey Foundation for Funder briefing
Red Envelope Giving Circle as a workshop sponsor for “Giving Circles: Mobilizing Money for Our Communities”
Kriya and Nina Chantalat Giving Fund as a workshop sponsor for “You’ve Got To Be Kidding Me! Expanding Our Families With Babies and More”

NQAPIA Supporters
Alphawood Foundation
Arcus Foundation
Aratani Foundation
Borealis Philanthropies: Impact Litigation Fund
CJ Huang Foundation
Common Counsel Foundation
Dinner Guys Giving Circle
Liberty Hill Foundation – Rapid Response Fund
New York Community Trust
OCA Greater Houston Chapter
Office of Minority Health Resource Center / DHHS
Open Society Foundations
Project by Project
Unbound Philanthropy
Wild Geese Foundation
Walter and Evelyn Haas, Jr. Fund
Wellspring Philanthropic Fund

Supporter
Glenn Magpantay
Tides Foundation

 

About HIV/AIDS

Find HIV/AIDS Prevention & Service Providers

Enter your address, city and state, or ZIP Code:

For more information on this widget, please visit HIV.gov.

Love & Solidarity: Together PrEP, Testing, and Treatment Can End HIV/AIDS

All information listed here is from www.HIV.gov

Find a Testing Location

What Is HIV?

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, if not treated. Unlike some other viruses, the human body can’t get rid of HIV completely, even with treatment. So once you get HIV, you have it for life.

HIV attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells (T cells), which help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of CD4 cells (T cells) in the body, making the person more likely to get other infections or infection-related cancers. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease. These opportunistic infections or cancers take advantage of a very weak immune system and signal that the person has AIDS, the last stage of HIV infection.

No effective cure currently exists, but with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled. The medicine used to treat HIV is called antiretroviral therapy or ART. If taken the right way, every day, this medicine can dramatically prolong the lives of many people infected with HIV, keep them healthy, and greatly lower their chance of infecting others. Before the introduction of ART in the mid-1990s, people with HIV could progress to AIDS in just a few years. Today, someone diagnosed with HIV and treated before the disease is far advanced can live nearly as long as someone who does not have HIV.

What Is AIDS?

AIDS is the most severe phase of HIV infection. People with AIDS have such badly damaged immune systems that they get an increasing number of severe illnesses, called opportunistic infections.

How Is HIV Transmitted?

You can get or transmit HIV only through specific activities. Most commonly, people get or transmit HIV through sexual behaviors and needle or syringe use.

Only certain body fluids—blood, semen, pre-seminal fluid, rectal fluids, vaginal fluids, and breast milk—from a person who has HIV can transmit HIV. These fluids must come in contact with a mucous membrane or damaged tissue or be directly injected into the bloodstream (from a needle or syringe) for transmission to occur. Mucous membranes are found inside the rectum, vagina, penis, and mouth.

In the United States, HIV is spread mainly by

  • Having anal or vaginal sex with someone who has HIV without using a condom or taking medicines to prevent or treat HIV.
    • For the HIV-negative partner, receptive anal sex (bottoming) is the highest-risk sexual behavior, but you can also get HIV from insertive anal sex (topping).
    • Either partner can get HIV through vaginal sex, though it is less risky for getting HIV than receptive anal sex.
  • Sharing needles or syringes, rinse water, or other equipment (works) used to prepare drugs for injection with someone who has HIV. HIV can live in a used needle up to 42 days depending on temperature and other factors.

Who is at Risk for HIV?

HIV can affect anyone regardless of sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, gender or age. However, certain groups are at higher risk for HIV and merit special consideration because of particular risk factors.

Gay and bisexual men have the largest number of new diagnoses in the United States. Blacks/African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos are disproportionately affected by HIV compared to other racial and ethnic groups. Also, transgender women who have sex with men are among the groups at highest risk for HIV infection, and injection drug users remain at significant risk for getting HIV.

Risky behaviors, like having anal or vaginal sex without using a condom or taking medicines to prevent or treat HIV, and sharing needles or syringes play a big role in HIV transmission. Anal sex is the highest-risk sexual behavior. If you don’t have HIV, being a receptive partner (or bottom) for anal sex is the highest-risk sexual activity for getting HIV. If you do have HIV, being the insertive partner (or top) for anal sex is the highest-risk sexual activity for transmitting HIV.

How Can I Tell if I Have HIV?

You can't rely on symptoms to tell if you have HIV. The only way to know for sure is to GET TESTED.You cannot rely on symptoms to tell whether you have HIV. The only way to know for sure if you have HIV is to get tested. Knowing your status is important because it helps you make healthy decisions to prevent getting or transmitting HIV.

 

2018 HIV and API Factsheet

2018 Stigma Factsheet

Media Advisory Template 05192017

Talking Points Template 05192018

LGBT Asians/South Asians Urge U.S.  Supreme Court to Strike Down Trump’s  Anti-Muslim Travel Ban

Read the LGBT Amicus Brief at bit.ly/17-956

Tomorrow on April 25, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Donald Trump’s third iteration of his anti-Muslim Travel Ban. The ban, issued by Executive Order, bars people from certain majority Muslim countries from coming to the United States.

LGBT Asian/South Asian groups submitted an amicus (“friend of the court”) brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down. The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA), with the pro bono assistance of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP, spearheaded the brief illustrating the impact of Trump’s travel ban on the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Brief is here: bit.ly/17-956.

Glenn D. Magpantay, NQAPIA Executive Director and Counsel on the Amicus Brief, said, “Trump’s anti-Muslim travel ban has a direct impact on the lives of LGBT people and tears families apart. The defense relies on some of the cases and legal theories that supported the internment of Japanese Americans.”

He continued, “We’ve been here before. In 1987, President Regan instituted an anti-HIV Travel ban. In 1952, the U.S. Supreme Court banned homosexuals because they were persons of ‘bad moral character.’ In 1882, the Chinese Exclusion Act banned Chinese from immigrating to the United States. Let’s never forget. Never again.”

Arguments

The amicus brief details the oppressive conditions for LGBT people living in the countries named in the travel ban, where homosexuality is criminalized and LGBT people are persecuted. The brief explains how Trump’s ban prevents LGBT people in those countries from joining their families and loved ones in the United States, increasing their exposure to persecution in their home countries.

Moreover, the brief argues that the ban deprives U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents of their constitutionally-protected liberty interests in maintaining familial relationships with their loved ones whose safety is jeopardized by their sexual orientation or gender identity. Because the ban’s narrow—and legally required—exceptions lack meaningful rules guaranteeing equal treatment of LGBT visa applicants, Trump’s travel ban disproportionately denies LGBT people the ability to reunite with their loved ones in the United States.

Co-Signers

8 signed-on organizations

Seven (7) LGBTQ South Asian and Asian Pacific Islander organizations across the country join as co-amici to sign on to the brief:

  • API Equality-Los Angeles
  • API Equality-Northern California (APIENC)
  • Invisible to Invincible (i2i): Asian Pacific Islander Pride of Chicago
  • KhushDC
  • Massachusetts Area South Asian Lambda Association (MASALA)
  • Queer South Asian Collective (QSAC)
  • South Asian Lesbian and Gay Association of New York City (SALGA-NYC)
  • Trikone Northwest

In addition to these groups, the NYC Gay & Lesbian Anti Violence Project; Immigration Equality; LGBT bar associations in New York (LeGaL), Chicago (LAGBAC), San Francisco (BALIF), and Los Angeles; and GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) in Boston also joined.

Shristi Pant, a member of QSAC in Boston, said, “As an organization for South Asian queer and trans folks, we have a duty to support our Muslim community members, as well as Muslim folks from other areas of the world. This travel ban is just one aspect of the anti-Muslim violence that is being perpetuated in and by the U.S. and one that deeply affects Muslim LGBTQA+ folks in need of refuge from the violence they already face.”

Sammie Ablaza Wills, Director of API Equality-Northern California, commented that, “The anti-Muslim and anti-refugee ban is political fear mongering, directly impacting many in our communities. As LGBTQ Asian and Pacific Islander people, we understand that we cannot accept policies that dehumanize our Muslim and refugee family members. APIENC is dedicated to working towards safety and freedom for our people, and we will fight the Muslim ban at the airports, on the streets, and in the courts.”

Anne Watanabe, i2i core member in Chicago further elaborated, “As Asian Americans, we remember the disgraceful U.S. history of 120,000 Japanese American and Japanese people being forced into detention camps as a result of wartime hysteria filled with racism. We are now seeing this racist history repeat itself against Muslims and other targeted communities.”

Prior Actions

API Equality-LA works in solidarity with LGBTQ Muslims and those affected by racial profiling. In 2017, API Equality-LA took action on 9/11 highlighting the experiences of queer and trans Muslims and South Asians through a vigil hosted at Los Angeles City Hall. Its Indi(visible) Campaign advocates for a holistic approach towards immigration equality that encompasses challenging Islamophobia and the Muslim Ban, defending DACA and undocumented communities, and protecting LGBTQ immigrants, particularly trans immigrants of color.

Last fall, before the Supreme Court was scheduled to hear oral arguments on Trump’s second version of the travel ban, NQAPIA and several of the co-signing groups organized awareness raising actions in seven (7) cities—Austin, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Washington, DC—protesting the violence, harassment, and profiling that LGBTQ South Asians and Muslims have endured since 9/11.

“For the past two years, on the anniversary of 9/11, KhushDC has participated in and organized direct actions to raise awareness of Islamophobia. These actions bring attention to the increased profiling and discrimination faced by Muslim people in the U.S.,” said Anish Tailor of KhushDC.

The effort, entitled “#QueerAzaadi,” featured community funerals to lift the names of Muslims and those perceived to be Muslim, trans women, African Americans, and undocumented immigrants killed in hate crimes; storytelling speak outs of LGBTQ Muslims and experiences of violence in the last 16 years; and mock checkpoints targeting white people to replicate the profiling that South Asian, Muslim, API, and people of color experience at airports and government buildings. 300 people participated in the actions in seven (7) cities that unveiled the interlocking systems of Islamophobia, Transphobia, Xenophobia, and Anti-Blackness.

Voices of Queer Muslims

NQAPIA has also published the personal stories of LGBT Muslims and South Asians sharing their experiences of policing and profiling in writing at nqapia.org/redefinesecurity-stories and in video at nqapia.org/redefinesecurity-videos.

Historical Timeline

1882 – Anti-Chinese Travel Ban
In 1882, Congress adopted and the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Chinese Exclusion Act, the first piece of federal legislation that singled out a minority group for invidious discrimination and barred their entry. It was not until 1943 that Chinese people could naturalize to become U.S. citizens. The Act was passed after many Chinese people had built the transcontinental railroad which unified the United States East and West.

1952 – Anti-LGBT Travel Ban
From 1952 to 1990, LGBT people were excluded from the U.S. because they were deemed to be of “psychopathic personality.” The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the law and its application to homosexuals. Lower courts further denied the naturalization of LGBT immigrants because they were persons of “bad moral character.”

1987 – Anti-HIV Travel Ban
From 1987 to 2010, President Reagan issued an Executive Order, which President Bush extended, barring people with AIDS or who were HIV+ from entering the United States. Congress then codified the HIV+ exclusion into federal law in 1993. It was not until 2010, under President Obama, when the travel restriction was eliminated.

2017 – Anti-Muslim Travel Ban
Trump issued an executive order preventing people from 6 majority Muslim counties (Syria, Iran, Libya, Sudan, Yemen, and Somalia) and all refugees from entering the United States.

# # #

The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) is a nationwide federation of LGBTQ Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (API) organizations. We seek to build the organizational capacity of local LGBTQ API groups, develop leadership, and expand collaborations to better challenges anti-LGBT bias and racism.

#NeverAgain nomuslimbanever.com #QueerAzaadi

Not Another Death Threat: Queer and Trans Muslim Realities in America

By Almas Haider

There should be a name for the particular depression of living as a queer trans Muslim of color in America. A specific PTSD of walking the streets in constant fear of being racialized as Muslim and have your gender and sexual orientation questioned. The pleasure of not just having one day a year, September 11th, to expect extra harassment, but surprise holidays like “Punish a Muslim Day.” The joy of calling your mother and father, asking them their plans for the day, and telling them to “be mindful, keep your phone charged, and go home and call me if you don’t feel safe outside today.” Because to be a queer trans Muslim of color in America means to live in a state of anticipation of what hate violence we can expect next.

In the past two years since Trump’s campaign and subsequent election, there has been a surge in anti-immigrant legislation and hate violence. According to a study conducted by South Asians Americans Leading Together (SAALT), from Election Day 2016 to Election Day 2017 there have been “302 incidents of hate violence and xenophobic political rhetoric aimed at South Asian, Muslim, Sikh, Hindu, Middle Eastern, and Arab communities in the United States.” 82% of these incidents were motivated by anti-Muslim sentiment, a “45% increase from the year leading up to the 2016 election cycle, levels not seen since the year after September 11th.” [SAALT]

This rapidly escalating level of hate violence was not created in a vacuum. This cycle of violence is directly tied to the racist and xenophobic legislation and systems of the United States. The latest manifestation of this has been the Muslim Travel Ban which will be heard by the Supreme Court on April 25th. The executive order, “bans citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. for 90 days, suspends the entry of all refugees for at least 120 days, and bars Syrian refugees indefinitely,” creating yet another form of institutionalized Islamophobia in the U.S. [ACLU].

In response, on March 26th the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA) and seven LGBT South Asian and API groups submitted an amicus (“friend of the court”) brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down Donald Trump’s Muslim Travel Ban. The brief showed how the ban has a direct impact on the lives of LGBTQIA people and tears families apart.

This brief is in part a direct response to an attempt to pinkwash the Muslim Travel Ban. Language included in the Ban says it will protect Americans by barring entry to “those who would oppress Americans of any race, gender, or sexual orientation” [Human Rights First]. This insinuates that people living in Muslim-majority countries are queerphobic and transphobic, a marketing and political tool most infamously being used by Israel to justify Palestinian genocide.

How quintessentially American: the Ban would bar queer and trans immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers from seeking a complicated form of “safety” in the U.S., while claiming that the ban will help keep queer and trans people safe. This will in turn further the narrative of queerphobic and transphobic tyrants reigning in Muslim majority countries, justifying ongoing U.S. imperialism and intervention in the Middle East and creating more refugees. And the amount of physical and verbal violence queer and trans Muslims of color experience within the U.S. will continue to increase.

As the policies of the state become normalized in our everyday lives, the next turn in this cycle of queer, trans, and gendered islamophobia is the increase in hate crimes against our communities. For queer and trans Muslims of color, these attacks target multiple identities that we hold. According to the 2016 FBI Hate Crimes Statistic report, hate crimes against racial and ethnic minorities drastically increased in 2016. 25% of incidents were motivated by anti-Muslim bias alongside 18% anti-queer and anti-trans bias incidents. This makes queer and trans Muslims of color disproportionately likely to be victims. [FBI report]

Through our organizing as queer and trans Muslims, we aim to change that.

For the last two years, on September 11th, we have been crafting actions across the U.S. The purpose of these actions has been to educate, empower, and hold our community who experience the nuances of being profiled as queer Muslims of color. Our actions, drawing inspiration from Black Lives Matter and the movement for Palestinian liberation, have ranged from mock “security” checkpoints to guerilla performance art.

We are questioned and detained not just because of the languages we speak, our ancestral homes, and places of worship and communal gathering, but also because of how we express our gender and sexual identity through our appearance and the political movements we align with. Through these actions we have focused on the ways that Islamophobia and transphobia reinforce each other, how Black Muslims are particularly impacted by queer and gendered islamophobia, and building solidarity internally within our LGBTQIA community.

On the 15th anniversary of September 11th, we spearheaded 20 local organizations to create “checkpoints” in high-traffic areas of Washington, D.C. The Washington Post showed how we aimed to replicate various “checkpoints” and experiences that Muslim Americans and those perceived to be Muslims have to go through every day, including being stopped by the Transportation Security Administration, being verbally and physically harassed in businesses, and routinely called terrorists.

In 2017, after a year of direct and blatant attacks on our communities by the Trump administration, we focused on creating spaces of not only resistance, but also of healing and safety. We named the Muslim Travel Ban and other forms of state violence as the root cause of queerphobic, transphobic, and Islamophobic hate crimes. We drew connections between queerphobia, transphobia, Islamophobia, anti-Blackness, xenophobia. We questioned how we show up for one another. And we committed and successfully created spaces for all of our communities to mourn both the lives and the safety that has been taken from us since the election.

Through this work we as queer and trans Muslims of color have recognized and grown our power in a country that seeks to alienate, imprison, and murder us within and outside its borders. And as we wait in anticipation for the the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Muslim Ban, we begin our plans for an annualized and formal nationwide series of actions on September 11th. We now look to September 11th and every day, not with fear, but with the resolve and strengthened ability to create a different world. And ask our accomplices to be ready to join us.

Almas Haider is the Racial Justice and Immigrants’ Rights Committee Chair of the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance and Community Partnerships Manager at South Asian Americans Leading Together.

You can learn more about and get involved with the work of the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance to combat Islamophobia, transphobia and queerphobia at www.nqapia.org.

Texas SB4’s Impact on LGBTQ South Asians – Why We Should Care

Texas SB4’s Impact on LGBTQ South Asians – Why We Should Care

By Amrit Uprety of KhushATX and Sasha W. of the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)

This past week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit upheld Texas Senate Bill 4 (SB4) one of the most rigorous anti-immigrant laws passed since Donald Trump took office.

Last May, Governor Greg Abbott signed SB4 into law which would allow racial profiling and subject anyone perceived to be an immigrant — in other words, all communities of color — to unlimited questioning about their immigration status, all by local law enforcement officials with little or no training in immigration law. It prevents any city in the state of Texas from becoming a “sanctuary city,”  and levies heavy penalties against local officials who push back against federal immigration authorities.

Resistance to the bill was clear and rapid.  Just one day after the bill was signed into law, city and county officials in Texas filed a lawsuit to block implementation. The four largest cities in Texas joined the lawsuit.  Then, LGBTQ Asian and South Asian  community groups in Texas, including KhushATX in Austin, Coalition of Houston Asian Americans, and Dragonflies in Dallas joined the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance to file anamicus brief illustrating the impact of the law on the LGBTQ and Asian American community.

According to the Census, South Asians and Asian Americans make up the fastest-growing immigrant groups in the country — we are the largest percentage of documented and undocumented immigrants coming to the U.S. And, as we know, many of our South Asian immigrant community is also LGBTQ. Nationally there are 267,000 LGBTQ immigrants from Asian countries, that includes various South Asian nations, including nearly 40,000 who are undocumented.

SB4 would subject South Asians and all people of color to profiling, discriminatory stops by police and interrogation about their immigration status. If the law goes into effect, our LGBTQ and South Asian community members will be caught in the crossfire.

As LGBTQ South Asians, we are no strangers to discriminatory policing and racial, ethnic and religious profiling. As queer people of color, SB4’s legalized profiling evokes the history of police raids of LGBT bars — Stonewall, which helped to catalyze the LGBT movement, which was a riot against this queer and transphobic policing. As South Asians, our communities have faced increased Islamophobia and profiling since 9/11, which has skyrocketed.  This kind of everyday profiling happens at airports, on public streets, and in our places of work and worship.

As queer and trans South Asians, we must fight back against being profile for “looking” immigrant, trans, queer, Muslim, South Asian, Latinx, Black. KhushATX, with other LGBTQ Asian American groups in Texas and throughout the South, worked with NQAPIA to oppose SB4. We hand-wrote 50 letters to government officials to block the law from taking effect, and we asked them to continue resisting this racist, xenophobic bill.

You can learn about what’s happening with our LGBTQ South Asian immigrant family in Texas. Don’t ignore the struggles and the beautiful resistance of the South. If you are in or have family in Texas, read and share this oped. And stay ready to support our family when we are called — whether it be in the form of a handwritten letter, a phone call, a protest, or a rally — to show up and hold space in solidarity with our LGBTQ immigrant family.

Learn More

Fact Sheet about Texas SB 4’s impact on LGBTQ Asian Americas and South Asians, and translation in Urdu.

2018 Community Catalyst Awards

It’s time for NQAPIA’s Annual Community Catalyst Awards Banquet Fundraisers in New York City and Washington, DC! Click each invitation to learn more about each dinner.Community Catalyst Awards NY PromotionCommunity Catalyst Awards DC Promotion

Movement Convergences

NQAPIA is coming to your city to ask you: where are we now, and where will we go? Let’s identify the threats we’re up against and build our QTAPI political home!

RSVP at bit.ly/convergences18

Movement Convergences

Program

Each Movement Convergence is an opportunity for us to learn, share, and grow with one another between our local and national LGBTQ API community. We’ll share our values with one another, and you’ll teach us the threats in your area. How do we organize with these two things in mind, and how can NQAPIA as a national organization support you locally? Together, we will build power and build our QTAPI political home!

Locations & Dates

Click each city’s name to join their Facebook event.

City Date Time
Austin March 10 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Washington, DC April 14 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
New York City April 16 6:00-9:30 p.m.
Portland April 29 12:00-4:00 p.m.
Seattle April 30 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Bay Area May 14 5:30-8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles May 16 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Chicago May 26 12:00-4:00 p.m.

RSVP

To attend, please RSVP at bit.ly/convergences18. Select your city in the drop-down menu

Accessibility

Please respect the space and the people around you by helping create a scent-free environment.

For more access needs, please let us know when you register at bit.ly/convergences18.

Donations

Any donations will go towards food and materials at each of the Movement Convergences. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.

bit.ly/convergences18

If you can’t attend a convergence but still want to support us, please make a donation by selecting “No RSVP – Donation Only” in the drop-down city selection. We appreciate any support!

Help Us Save DACA Today!

#DefendDACA & Speak Out for Our Communities

Save DACA

Six months ago, the Trump administration announced a future end to the DACA program unless Congress acts to preserve it. Today is that day. DACA’s cancellation will make 800,000 undocumented young immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children again fear deportation and separation from their family, friends, and lives here. We must defend DACA with all we’ve got.

We believe that all people deserve to live, work, and study in the US without fear of deportation. To keep many in the LGBT and API community safe, join us in urging Trump to save DACA by supporting a clean DREAM Act.

Overtake Trump’s Social Media!

Last month, you might have read NQAPIA’s OpEd on the impact of DACA on the LGBTQ community and the need for a #cleanDREAMact, written by Executive Director Glenn Magpantay. Make sure that Trump also reads it by tweeting the link: bit.ly/dacaoped.

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Tweet this message @realDonaldTrump

Protect our #LGBT and #API communities by supporting a #CleanDreamAct free of a #BorderWall, expanded detention beds & deportations, & changes to the #FamilyImmigration system. I #DefendDACA w @NQAPIA & Glenn bit.ly/dacaoped

Notice Something New?

NQAPIA is switching over our client databases, and we have all sorts of new tools! These social media callouts are some of them. Look forward to more new changes from NQAPIA in the near future.

#DefendDACA   nqapia.salsalabs.org/savedacafighttrump/