What Do We Mean when We Say #APIs4BlackLives?

Why and how do we show up in solidarity with the Movement for Black Lives? What do we really mean when we say #APIs4BlackLives?

QAPIs4BlackLives

Click the image to watch NQAPIA’s QAPIs4BlackLives video

Hear members of the NQAPIA family talk about their personal experiences with police, where their solidarity comes from, and why they are engaged in their communities to support local #BlackLivesMatter organizing. Hear from some of the voices that are typically marginalized in Asian spaces: Southeast Asians, South Asians, trans & gender non-conforming folks, working-class people, and people at the intersection of these and other identities.

Now is the time to have hard conversations about solidarity in our communities. Please share our #QAPIs4BlackLives video (bit.ly/QAPIs4BlackLivesVideo) on Facebook andTwitter and lift up these API voices that we rarely hear.

Are you interested in continuing this conversation in your community space, organization, or school? Email sasha@nqapia.org to talk about scheduling a training.

Korean Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

Parents_Korean_web

Korean Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

This month of June, tune into your local Asian Television station and see Korean parents who love their transgender children.

Korean with English subtitles – Clara Yoon, a Korean mother of a transgender son

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Korean leaflet (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

Filipino Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

Parents - Tagalog_web

Filipino Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have Asian American parents who love their LGBT kids say that… on television… in Tagalog? In June, tune in to your local Asian Television station, and see for yourselves!

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Asian ethnic television stations will air these videos during the month of June.

English with Tagalog subtitles – Carol Mannion, a Filipina mother of a gay son

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, transgender, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Tagalog (click to view and download)
Ilocano (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

Chinese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Parents_Chinese_web

Chinese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have Asian American parents who love their LGBT kids say that… on television… in Chinese? In June, tune in to your local Asian Television station, and see for yourselves!

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Asian ethnic television stations will air these videos during the month of June.

Mandarin with English subtitles – Deanna Cheng, a Chinese mother of a gay son
Cantonese with English subtitles – Rosetta Lai, a Chinese mother of a lesbian daughter

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of transgender and genderqueer kids as well. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Chinese
Simplified script leaflet (click to view and download)
Traditional script leaflet (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

South Asian Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Parents_Hindi_web

South Asian Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSA

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have Asian American parents who love their LGBT kids say that… on television… in Hindi? In June, tune in to your local Asian Television station, and see for yourselves!

Translated materials are also available in BengaliGujaratiPunjabiUrduArabic, and Hindi.

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

South Asian ethnic television stations will air these videos during the month of June.

English with Hindi subtitles – Vinay Chaudhry, an Indian father of a genderqueer child
Hindi with English subtitles – Kamlesh and Harcharan Bagga, Indian parents of a gay son

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, transgender, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian Languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Hindi (click to view and download)
Gujarati (click to view and download)
Punjabi (click to view and download)
Bengali (click to view and download)
Urdu (click to view and download)
Arabic (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

Southeast Asian Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

Parents_Lao_Web

Southeast Asian Parents who love their LGBT kids – PSA

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have Asian American parents who love their LGBT kids say that… on television… in Vietnamese and Lao? In June, tune in to your local Asian Television station, and see for yourselves! Translated materials are also available in  VietnameseThaiKhmerHmongLao, and Indonesian. NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children. Southeast Asian ethnic television stations will air these videos during the month of June.

Vietnamese with English subtitles – Ha Nguyen, a Vietnamese mother of a gay son English with Lao subtitlesPhanida Phivilay, a Lao mother of a lesbian daughter

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, transgender, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

 Vietnamese
Thai
Khmer
Hmong
Lao
Indonesian

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

Japanese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

Parents_Japanese_web

Japanese Parents who Love their LGBT Kids – PSAs

This month of June, tune into your local Asian Television station, and see Japanese parents who love their transgender children.

English with Japanese subtitles – Marsha and Tad Aizumi, Japanese parents of a transgender son

NQAPIA and the Asian Pride Project collaborated to develop a series of multilingual public service announcements (PSA)—short, beautiful videos of Asian American, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents who love their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children.

Throughout the LGBT Pride Month, we are also releasing videos featuring other Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian parents of gay men, lesbian daughters, and genderqueer kids. Our goals are to diversify the faces of parents who have LGBT kids and to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

Translated “Family is Still Family, Love is Still Love”

Multilingual Leaflets in 19 Asian languages

NQAPIA and parents developed a series of one-page, translated leaflets for parents who have LGBT kids. The multilingual leaflets answer basic questions about being LGBT and dispel common misperceptions. They are in nineteen (19) Asian languages and scripts—the largest number of languages ever translated from a single LGBT document.

Japanese leaflet (click to view and download)

We hope the videos and written materials will be helpful resources for young people (and really anyone) who aim to come out to their parents.

Marking the day of reflection: #TDOR

Written by Maxwell Ng

It’s Trans Awareness Week (TAW) across the country; that means communities everywhere are busy holding educational and social events.  This week of events culminates with an event called Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR): a candlelight vigil where we remember and memorialize people around the world who have died for being Trans or gender non-conforming.  TDOR started here in Boston, after a woman by the name of Rita Hester was murdered in Allston just for being who she is: a Trans woman of color.

When I was still a baby queer, I like so many others trying to figure out identity, searched high and low for community.  I had been exposed to the lesbian and gay community; a community that has become it’s own culture, complete with genre music, media icons and cruise ships.  As compelling and as shiny as this world of unicorns and rainbows is, it was not where I belonged.

What I found instead, was TDOR, and let me say, it was a stark difference.  TDOR is not a glitter clad parade down Main Street USA.  There are no Dykes on Bikes or Go-Go boys.  It is NOT a celebration.  It is a somber, solemn event, where the names of murder victims are read from a frighteningly long list.  And as dark as this event can be it continues to be one of the largest events for the Trans community: a time to be with friends and loved ones, and a time to recognize our fallen.

This year, one of those names that will be read aloud is Leslie Feinberg.  Feinberg came to me the same way she came to so many of you.  In the gut wrenching 1993 novel, Stone Butch Blues.  I was 19 when someone pushed that text into my hands with the mystical command “You must read this.”  The story was dark and real, and gritty and terrifying.  But it also seeded a magical quality of truth, perseverance and hope.  Maybe it was naïve of me to squint my eyes through the passages of sexual assault, and bathe in the paragraphs that described so perfectly, the joy of finding a person to love.  But I did these things, and took Feinberg’s words as a blanket, a road map, and a shield into my own journey that I knew would be plagued by heartbreak and discrimination.

And here I am, so many years later thinking about a world without Leslie Feinberg, and I am at an incalculable loss.  One of the unfortunate side effects that I’ve experienced since starting testosterone is that I no longer have the ability to cry.  So I find it ironic that the one most influential author who enabled me to start my path has also rendered me unable to shed tears over her death.  Consequently, I can express tremendous rage.  Feinberg was a warrior poet and a pioneer who would never allow herself to be victimized, but still was suffering from basic human discrimination by an inability to access health care as a transgender person.  This is an injustice that horribly affects so many, and is something tangible that I can punch with my activist fists.

I like to remind people that gay pride in the USA was catalyzed by the Stonewall Riots in NYC.  On that fateful night in June of 1969, a group of drag queens and butch dykes had the gall to fight back.  They took a stand and said they would not be targeted any longer for their gender presentation or identity.  The modern gay civil rights movement owes it’s start to Trans and gender non conforming people who were being abused, persecuted and murdered.  Today, we will read hundreds of names of people who were killed violently: people like Jennifer Laude, the 26 year old Filipina whose hateful murder also highlights the problems with US armed forces serving abroad. And we will also add hundreds of other names of people like Leslie Feinberg who were killed by systemic and institutionalized transphobia.

My own personal copy of Stone Butch Blues was battered and loved, with notes in the margins and torn cover.  Just as it was shared with me, I needed to pass it along and share with others.  TDOR is in all our roots.  Please remember.

Find a TDOR event in your community

#TDOR #Translivesmatter #Justice4Jennifer

Maxwell Ng is an Asian American transman who has lived in Boston for almost 20 years. He is the Chair of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition (MTPC), a founding player of the Trailblazers, the Boston based softball team for trans and gender variant people, and serves on the Steering Committee for QAPA (Queer Asian Pacific-Islander Alliance). He is passionate about visibility for Queer Asians, and strives to bring the issues that impact our enriched communities to the forefront. He is a graduate of Boston University and in his professional life, he works as an architect.

Foto: © Anh Ðào Kolbe/adkfoto.com

Washington, DC Special Screening of “Documented” and Q&A featuring filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas- June 1, 2014

We are pleased to present a special screening of Jose Antonio Vargas’ film, “Documented” during its opening weekend in the nation’s capital.

 

Tickets are general admission- we STRONGLY encourage people to buy tickets online in advance here.

 

For the Sunday June 1 5pm showing, Jose will be on hand for a Q&A panel with leaders of local and national LGBT, Filipino American, and Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander (AAPI) organizations. Further information is below. Please note: you MUST buy a ticket for general admission to see the film as you would normally in order to stay afterwards for the Q&A. The venue is a small, independent theater, so seats will go quickly. We encourage people to come early and stay late!

 

Information for “Documented” Screening

Sunday, June 1, 5pm
West End Theater
2301 M Street, NW
5:00 PM Showing

Q&A Panel Featuring Local and National Advocates

Jose Antonio Vargas, Filmmaker and founder, Define American 
Mara Keisling, Executive Director, National Center for Transgender Equality
Marita Etcubanez, Former Co-chair, Kaya: Filipino Americans for Progress- DC Chapter
Ben de Guzman, Co-Director for Programs, National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance 

Co-Sponsors

National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA)
National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
National Center for Transgender Equality
Kaya: Filipino Americans for Progress – DC Chapter
Asian Pacific Islander Queers United for Action (AQUA-DC)
Asian Pacific Islander Queer Sisters (APIQS)
KhushDC: South Asian LGBT Organization in Washington, DC

 

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Uncovering Our Stories: Sapna Pandya